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Letter to Sir William ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
, March 13, 1819

Edited by Lisa M. Wilson.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 1 October 2015. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: IMG0254.jpg, IMG0255.jpg, IMG0256.jpg, IMG0257.jpg, IMG0258.jpg, IMG0259.jpg,IMG0260.jpg, IMG0261.jpg, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 366

One sheet of paper, four surfaces photographed.Address leaf bearing red postmark surmounted by a crown (franking stamp), reading
FREE
29 MR 29
1819
.Sheet (pages three and four) torn on right edge of page three where wax seal was removed.Red wax seal, complete, adhered to page four.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
To Sir W. Elford--William Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
Bertram HouseBertram House, Berkshire, England | Grazeley | Berkshire | England | | Mansion built by George Mitford for his family residence, begun in April 1802 and completed in June 1804, after tearing down the previous house on the property, Grazeley Court Farm, a farmhouse about three miles outside of Reading, in the hamlet of Grazeley. George Mitford named his new house after a knight from the reign of William the Conqueror, Sir Robert de Bertram, who had married Sibella Mitford, daughter of Sir John de Mitford (source: Vera Watson). This estate signified George Mitford’s status as a land-owning country gentleman. Prior to this time, the Mitford family lived in Alresford and then in Reading. The family removed from Bertram House in April 1820, after financial reverses forced the family to sell the property.--#ebb #lmwMarch 13th
1819
.
My dear SirWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw

I rather think my FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
is going to LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 tomorrow--so as he will be able to get a frank--a thing which if our poor unlucky pensioned M. P.John Weyland, or: Mr. Weyland
On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland (395 votes.) . --#ajc
gets turned out[1] Parliamentary elections took place on 16 March 1819 in which Charles Fysshe Palmer Charles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
defeated incumbent John WeylandJohn Weyland, or: Mr. Weyland
On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland (395 votes.) . --#ajc
, as Mitford hints may happen here.—#lmw
may be rather a rare article in this unparliamentary neighborhood--& as you may take it into your head not to write till you hear, & for many other good reasons I shall trouble you with a letter at once. Besides I have been meeting a DevonshireDevonshire, England | Devon | 50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 | County in the south west of England bordering the English Channel and the Bristol Channel. Now called Devon.--#ebb #lmw50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 SquireThomas Northmore | Born: 1776 in Fulham, Middlesex. Died: 1851 in Furzebrook House, near Axminster.
An acquaintance of MRM. In a letter to Haydon dated 9 February 1824 , Mitford refers to Mr. Northmore as "a great Devonshire reformer, one of the bad epic poets and very pleasant men in which that country abounds" ( Life of Mary Russell Mitford ed. L’Estrange Vol II, page 22 ).--#kab
of your'syours & I want to talk about him, & to ask questions & so forth. I write tell you the whole story. The husband of my most intimate friend in this neighborhood (Mr. DickinsonCharles Dickinson, or: Mr. Dickinson | Born: 1755-03-06 in Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire, England. Died: 1827 in Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Friend of the Mitford family. Charles Dickinson was born on March 6, 1755 at Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire. He was the son of Vikris Dickinson and Elizabeth Marchant. The Dickinson family were Quakers who lived in the vicinity of Bristol, Gloucestershire. On August 3, 1807, he married Catherine Allingham at St Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived at Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where the Mitfords visited them. Charles Dickinson owned a private press he employed to print literary works by his friends (See letters to Elford from March 13, 1819 and June 21, 1820). Charles Dickinson died at Farley Hill in 1827.--#ajc #lmw
of Farley HillFarley Hill, Berkshire, England | Farley Hill | Berkshire | England | 51.37339900000001 -0.9209210000000212 | Village in Berkshire, in the parish of Swallowfield. The Dickinsons lived there.--#lmw51.37339900000001 -0.9209210000000212--first Cousin to the Member for SomersetshireSomersetshire, England | Somerset | Somersetshire | England | 51.105097 -2.926230700000019 | County in southwest England, now known as Somerset. County town is Taunton.--#lmw51.105097 -2.926230700000019) happens you must know to be a very clever man--and a patriot--(such unions--lamentable as they are do  happen occur occasionally)--worse than a Patriot--he is an Ultra--an actual disciple of the old Major CartwrightJohn Cartwright, or: , Royal Navy officer, Major, Nottinghamshire militia | Born: 1740-09-17 in Marnham, Nottinghamshire, England. Died: 1824-09-23 in London, England.
Supported the aims of the American Revolution and radical and reformist causes in Great Britain. Corresponded with Thomas Jefferson. Wrote a pamphlet in 1776 advocating annual parliaments, the secret ballot, and universal manhood suffrage. Founder of the Society for Constutional Information, which developed into the London Corresponding Society. In 1794, was a witness at the "Treason Trials" supporting Horne Took, Thelwall, and Hardy. Also associated with Sir Francis Burdett, William Cobbett, and Francis Place. In 1812, founded the Hampden Clubs, political clubs designed to bring together like-minded middle-class reformers and working-class radicals. Supporter of Thomas Wooler and The Black Dwarf. The Life and Correspondence of Major Cartwright was published in 1826. --#lmw
. Well he had had some correspondence with your DevonshireDevonshire, England | Devon | 50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 | County in the south west of England bordering the English Channel and the Bristol Channel. Now called Devon.--#ebb #lmw50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 Dema- (bless me I was going to write Demagogue!) with your DevonshireDevonshire, England | Devon | 50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 | County in the south west of England bordering the English Channel and the Bristol Channel. Now called Devon.--#ebb #lmw50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 Patriot Mr. NorthmoreThomas Northmore | Born: 1776 in Fulham, Middlesex. Died: 1851 in Furzebrook House, near Axminster.
An acquaintance of MRM. In a letter to Haydon dated 9 February 1824 , Mitford refers to Mr. Northmore as "a great Devonshire reformer, one of the bad epic poets and very pleasant men in which that country abounds" ( Life of Mary Russell Mitford ed. L’Estrange Vol II, page 22 ).--#kab
--& they both belong to the Hampden ClubHampden Club
Radical men’s political clubs founded by Major John Cartwright, Mr. Johnson andThomas Northmore. They were intended to bring together middle-class reformers with working-class radicals in order to achieve reformist aims such as universal male suffrage.--#lmw
--& Mr. NorthmoreThomas Northmore | Born: 1776 in Fulham, Middlesex. Died: 1851 in Furzebrook House, near Axminster.
An acquaintance of MRM. In a letter to Haydon dated 9 February 1824 , Mitford refers to Mr. Northmore as "a great Devonshire reformer, one of the bad epic poets and very pleasant men in which that country abounds" ( Life of Mary Russell Mitford ed. L’Estrange Vol II, page 22 ).--#kab
being I suppose sent to Coventry[2] In British idiom, to be "sent to Coventry" was "to be ignored or ostracized. This behaviour often takes the form of pretending that the shunned person, although conspicuously present, can't be seen or heard." Thought to originate in the English Civil Wars, but the first recorded citation is from 1765. See "The Phrase Finder": . Here, Mitford uses the phrase to indicate someone who, although known, is not received in polite society, someone who might be "cut" in public.—#lmw in his own Country has & mind "to make his bear garden flourish here--for he is going about BerkshireBerkshire, England | Berkshire | England | 51.4669939 -1.185367700000029 | The county of Berkshire, England, abbreviated "Berks."--51.4669939 -1.185367700000029 estate hunting--so he invited himself to Farley HillFarley Hill, Berkshire, England | Farley Hill | Berkshire | England | 51.37339900000001 -0.9209210000000212 | Village in Berkshire, in the parish of Swallowfield. The Dickinsons lived there.--#lmw51.37339900000001 -0.9209210000000212 at a time when I happened to be staying there & he came & astonished us all prodigiously. My dear sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
, what a man! How loud & shrewd & full of himself & sharp all over from his eagle nose to his pointed hook toe! What a perpetual sky rocket bouncing starting & flaming! What a talker against time! Well might Mr. HobhouseJohn Cam Hobhouse, or: 1st Baron Broughton | Born: 1786-06-27 in Redland, England. Died: 1869-06-03 in Berkeley Square, London, England.
A friend and traveling companion of Lord Byron who contributed notes to the fourth canto of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, John Cam Hobhouse was elected to the House of Commons in 1820 as a member of the Whig party. In 1851, he became the First Baron Broughton. --#err #lmw
call him "the gentleman who came all the way from DevonshireDevonshire, England | Devon | 50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 | County in the south west of England bordering the English Channel and the Bristol Channel. Now called Devon.--#ebb #lmw50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 to tell page 2
us that he was a great man at home." And he is a Poet too. Has written an EpicWashingtonEpic_TN
Epic poem about George Washington published in 1809. Only Baltimore editions now in existence; Mitford may not have known of this work before she met Johnson and Northmore in 1819 because it was never published in England.--#lmw
, which must have appeared incognito--for I never remember to have heard it mentioned in my life. An Epic PoemWashingtonEpic_TN
Epic poem about George Washington published in 1809. Only Baltimore editions now in existence; Mitford may not have known of this work before she met Johnson and Northmore in 1819 because it was never published in England.--#lmw
about WashingtonGeorge Washington, General Washington, President of the United States of America, or: General Washington , President of the United States of America | Born: 1732-02-22 in Westmoreland county, Virginia, British America. Died: 1799-12-14 in Mount Vernon, Virginia, USA.
--
. A friend of his who came with him a very different sort of person--Mr. JohnsonJohn Johnson, or: John Johnson, esq., Mr. Johnson, the Junius of Marlow, Timothy Trueman
Friend who leaves his collection of political books to Northmore upon his death in 1821. Mitford helps his sister, Miss Johnson, sort out the books that are part of the estate, according to her letter of 1 July 1821. Lived at Seymour Court near Great Marlow before his death. Mitford reports meeting Mr. Johnson and Mr. Northmore for the first time in March 1819 in a letter to Elford. She describes him as "one of those delightful old men that render age so charming--mild playful kind & wise--talking just as Isaac Walton would have talked if we were to [have] gone out fishing with him." The Gentleman’s Magazine obituary lists his full name as "John Johnson, esq." and gives his date of death as 5 April 1821. See "Obituary; with Anecdotes of Remarkable Persons." Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review 91.1 (1821): "[Died] April 5 . . . John Johnson, esq. of Seymour-court, near Great Marlow, a celebrated member of the Hampden Club, and author of various political letters, &c., under the signature of Timothy Trueman" (381). The Monthly Repository of Theology and General Literature 16 (1821), lists the same death date and notes that he was "author of various political letters and essays in Mr. B. Flower’s "Political Register" and other periodical works, under the signature of Timothy Trueman" (314).--#lmw
--the JuniusLucius Brutus Junius, or: Junius, Consul of the Roman Republic | Born: in Ancient Rome. Died: -0509 in Silva Arsia, Rome.
--
of MarlowMarlow, Buckinghamshire, England | Marlow | Buckinghamshire | England | 51.5719443 -0.7769422000000077 | Town in Buckinghamshire on the Thames. Mitford’s friends Mr. Johnson and Miss Johnson resided near here.--#lmw51.5719443 -0.7769422000000077--who under the quaint name of Timothy TruemanTimothy Trueman
Pseudonym used by Mr. Johnson. Author of A Letter to the Independent Electors of Westminster (1809), Timothy Trueman’s Admonitions to the Clergy (1816), and The Curse of Gehazi (1819). Not the same as the author of the American publications The Burlington Almanac and The New Jersey Almanac.--#lmw
contrives to exersizeexercise so singular an influence in the  party county politics of this part of the world--Mr. JohnsonJohn Johnson, or: John Johnson, esq., Mr. Johnson, the Junius of Marlow, Timothy Trueman
Friend who leaves his collection of political books to Northmore upon his death in 1821. Mitford helps his sister, Miss Johnson, sort out the books that are part of the estate, according to her letter of 1 July 1821. Lived at Seymour Court near Great Marlow before his death. Mitford reports meeting Mr. Johnson and Mr. Northmore for the first time in March 1819 in a letter to Elford. She describes him as "one of those delightful old men that render age so charming--mild playful kind & wise--talking just as Isaac Walton would have talked if we were to [have] gone out fishing with him." The Gentleman’s Magazine obituary lists his full name as "John Johnson, esq." and gives his date of death as 5 April 1821. See "Obituary; with Anecdotes of Remarkable Persons." Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review 91.1 (1821): "[Died] April 5 . . . John Johnson, esq. of Seymour-court, near Great Marlow, a celebrated member of the Hampden Club, and author of various political letters, &c., under the signature of Timothy Trueman" (381). The Monthly Repository of Theology and General Literature 16 (1821), lists the same death date and notes that he was "author of various political letters and essays in Mr. B. Flower’s "Political Register" and other periodical works, under the signature of Timothy Trueman" (314).--#lmw
told me in answer to my questions about this poem, "That it displayed a very great spirit of liberty--& that independently of that there were some passages which were sufficiently felicitous." Is not this character the very model of the praise that damns? I dare say your abuse of it (if you should ever have seen it) will be much more merciful--at all events you must know the man--such a Volcano can hardly exist in a county without having been felt in its noise & smoke & stones & cinders--you must know about him & and do tell us--I never saw anyone who excited my curiosity more. Is he a gentleman born? And bred? What sort of woman is his wife? Is she sent to Coventry? And how do you class the animal?--I asked him if he knew you & he said you were a very able leader in the opposite forces--Perhaps you may know Mr. JohnsonJohn Johnson, or: John Johnson, esq., Mr. Johnson, the Junius of Marlow, Timothy Trueman
Friend who leaves his collection of political books to Northmore upon his death in 1821. Mitford helps his sister, Miss Johnson, sort out the books that are part of the estate, according to her letter of 1 July 1821. Lived at Seymour Court near Great Marlow before his death. Mitford reports meeting Mr. Johnson and Mr. Northmore for the first time in March 1819 in a letter to Elford. She describes him as "one of those delightful old men that render age so charming--mild playful kind & wise--talking just as Isaac Walton would have talked if we were to [have] gone out fishing with him." The Gentleman’s Magazine obituary lists his full name as "John Johnson, esq." and gives his date of death as 5 April 1821. See "Obituary; with Anecdotes of Remarkable Persons." Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review 91.1 (1821): "[Died] April 5 . . . John Johnson, esq. of Seymour-court, near Great Marlow, a celebrated member of the Hampden Club, and author of various political letters, &c., under the signature of Timothy Trueman" (381). The Monthly Repository of Theology and General Literature 16 (1821), lists the same death date and notes that he was "author of various political letters and essays in Mr. B. Flower’s "Political Register" and other periodical works, under the signature of Timothy Trueman" (314).--#lmw
too--only that he has been always so much of a literary recluse--for though originally of NorthumberlandNorthumberland, England | Northumberland | England | 55.2082542 -2.078413800000021 | County in north east England. County town is Alnwick. George Mitford was a descendant of an aristocratic family from Northumberland. George Mitford took Mary to visit relations in Northumberland in 1806.--#lmw55.2082542 -2.078413800000021 & now fixed in BuckinghamshireBuckinghamshire, England | Buckinghamshire England | 51.8137073 -0.8094704999999749 | County in southeast England; one of the "home counties" near London. County town is Aylesbury. Abbreviated "Bucks."--#lmw51.8137073 -0.8094704999999749 he has lived much in DevonshireDevonshire, England | Devon | 50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 | County in the south west of England bordering the English Channel and the Bristol Channel. Now called Devon.--#ebb #lmw50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373--if you did know him I am sure you would like him--he is one of those delightful old men that render age so charming--mild playful kind & wise--talking just as Isaac WaltonIzaak Walton | Born: 1594 in Stafford, England. Died: 1683-12-15 in Winchester, England.
Wrote The Compleat Angler and a book of short biographies, The Lives of John Donne, Henry Wotton, Rich’d Hooker, George Herbert, &c., sometimes called Walton’s Lives. --#ncl #lmw
would have talked if we were to ^have gone out fishing with him. It is one of Mr. NorthmoreThomas Northmore | Born: 1776 in Fulham, Middlesex. Died: 1851 in Furzebrook House, near Axminster.
An acquaintance of MRM. In a letter to Haydon dated 9 February 1824 , Mitford refers to Mr. Northmore as "a great Devonshire reformer, one of the bad epic poets and very pleasant men in which that country abounds" ( Life of Mary Russell Mitford ed. L’Estrange Vol II, page 22 ).--#kab
's sins in my eyes that he did not pay the proper attention to his venerable friend--If you suspect that he has affronted me you are mistaken--for except a little impage 3
pertinent sort of praise which he thought very flattering, he was exceedingly civil--but that manner of his affronts every body without meaning it--that astonishing quantity of modest assurance--& moreover when my beautiful Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
, 's best pupil, was singing what I think HandelGeorge George Georg Frideric Frederick Friedrich Handel Handel Händel, or: George Frederick Handel , Georg Friedrich Händel | Born: 1685-03-05. Died: 1759-04-14.
Anglo-German composer, influenced by the Italian Baroque. Settled in London in 1712 and became a naturalized British subject in 1727. --#ncl #lmw
's best song ("Where'er you walk""Where’er You Walk. George George Georg Frideric Frederick Friedrich Handel Handel Händel.
An aria sung by Jupiter from Handel’s 1743 opera Semele (HWV58).--#lmw
) he kept on one constant "very pretty, very pretty, very pretty" as a sort of running accompaniment--this was really too provoking--Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
's singing is not only my delight but my pride--Good bye Mr. NorthmoreThomas Northmore | Born: 1776 in Fulham, Middlesex. Died: 1851 in Furzebrook House, near Axminster.
An acquaintance of MRM. In a letter to Haydon dated 9 February 1824 , Mitford refers to Mr. Northmore as "a great Devonshire reformer, one of the bad epic poets and very pleasant men in which that country abounds" ( Life of Mary Russell Mitford ed. L’Estrange Vol II, page 22 ).--#kab
--Beau ideal of a democrat farewell! I have done with you--no--not quite either, for WashingtonWashingtonEpic_TN
Epic poem about George Washington published in 1809. Only Baltimore editions now in existence; Mitford may not have known of this work before she met Johnson and Northmore in 1819 because it was never published in England.--#lmw
is coming--at least Mr. JohnsonJohn Johnson, or: John Johnson, esq., Mr. Johnson, the Junius of Marlow, Timothy Trueman
Friend who leaves his collection of political books to Northmore upon his death in 1821. Mitford helps his sister, Miss Johnson, sort out the books that are part of the estate, according to her letter of 1 July 1821. Lived at Seymour Court near Great Marlow before his death. Mitford reports meeting Mr. Johnson and Mr. Northmore for the first time in March 1819 in a letter to Elford. She describes him as "one of those delightful old men that render age so charming--mild playful kind & wise--talking just as Isaac Walton would have talked if we were to [have] gone out fishing with him." The Gentleman’s Magazine obituary lists his full name as "John Johnson, esq." and gives his date of death as 5 April 1821. See "Obituary; with Anecdotes of Remarkable Persons." Gentleman’s Magazine and Historical Review 91.1 (1821): "[Died] April 5 . . . John Johnson, esq. of Seymour-court, near Great Marlow, a celebrated member of the Hampden Club, and author of various political letters, &c., under the signature of Timothy Trueman" (381). The Monthly Repository of Theology and General Literature 16 (1821), lists the same death date and notes that he was "author of various political letters and essays in Mr. B. Flower’s "Political Register" and other periodical works, under the signature of Timothy Trueman" (314).--#lmw
threatened to send the book--but I never promised to read it. Good bye for the present Mr. NorthmoreThomas Northmore | Born: 1776 in Fulham, Middlesex. Died: 1851 in Furzebrook House, near Axminster.
An acquaintance of MRM. In a letter to Haydon dated 9 February 1824 , Mitford refers to Mr. Northmore as "a great Devonshire reformer, one of the bad epic poets and very pleasant men in which that country abounds" ( Life of Mary Russell Mitford ed. L’Estrange Vol II, page 22 ).--#kab
I am going to talk of better things--I have just been reading the book I mentioned to you in my last--"Marriage"Marriage: A Novel. Susan Ferrier. Edinburgh London: William Blackwood John Murray. 1818. --very amusing indeed, though not quite so excellent as to be suspected to be a posthumous work of Miss AustenJane Austen | Born: 1775-12-16 in Steventon, Hampshire, England. Died: 1817-07-18 in Winchester, Hampshire, England.
Novelist celebrated for her wit and style, whose works investigated women’s social and economic vulnerabilities in English society. During her lifetime she published Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1815), all anonymously. Northanger Abbey, the first written of her novels (composed in 1798-1799) was published posthumously in 1818 along with her last finished novel, Persuasion. Mitford claims in a letter to Sir William Elford of 3 April 1815 that she has recently discovered Austen "is my countrywoman,", that is, a neighbor. Later in a letter of 2 July 1816 praised Emma in particular among Austen’s novels. She and Elford evidently knew the identity of Austen as the author long before the information was public knowledge, and she claims in the April 3 letter that her mother remembered Jane Austen in her youth as "the prettiest, silliest, most affected, husband-hunting butterfly she ever remembers", but that Jane was by the 1810s extremely quiet, which impressed Mitford: "till Pride and Prejudice showed what a precious gem was hidden in that unbending case, she was no more regarded in society than a poker or a fire-screen, or any other thin upright piece of wood or iron that fills its corner in peace and quietness. The case is very different now; she is still a poker--but a poker of whom every one is afraid. It must be confessed that this silent observation from such an observer is rather formidable. Most writers are good-humoured chatterers--neither very wise nor very witty:--but nine times out of ten (at least in the few that I have known) unaffected and pleasant, and quite removing by their conversation any awe that may have been excited by their works. But a wit, a delineator of character, who does not talk, is terrific indeed!" Source: L’Estrange. --#ebb
's--still I recommend it to you very strongly--It has the one great charm of a novel--it makes one laugh. There are four most delightful personages all new  and yet in books, & old in nature--three Scotch old maids--Miss JackyMiss Jacky
Character in Marriage; Mitford admires Ferrier’s characterization of her.--#lmw
--Miss NickyMiss Nicky
Character in Marriage; Mitford admires Ferrier’s characterization of her.--#lmw
--Miss GrizzyMiss Grizzy
Character in Marriage. Mitford’s favorite character from the novel; she admires the character’s portrayal and teasingly contemplates naming Sir William’s kitten after her.--#lmw
& a married friend Lady MaclaughlinMacLaughlanLady MacLaughlan
Character in Marriage; Mitford admires Ferrier’s characterization of her.--#lmw
--all are good--but Miss JackyMiss Jacky
Character in Marriage; Mitford admires Ferrier’s characterization of her.--#lmw
& Miss GrizzyMiss Grizzy
Character in Marriage. Mitford’s favorite character from the novel; she admires the character’s portrayal and teasingly contemplates naming Sir William’s kitten after her.--#lmw
are the inimitable pair--their letters, are equal to Mr. Collins Collins Mr. Collins
Character in Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice.--#lmw
's--How you would enjoy two such Correspondents!--What hearty laughs they would give you! Besides these exquisite portraits there is a great deal of comic talent throughout the work. And there had need. Nothing but the bouyant air-bladder of Comedy could have floated such heavy materials as the prosing & preaching of the second Volume--the total want of everything resembling interest from first to last--the interminable speeches--& that deadest of dead weights the all perfect Heroine. A book so heavypage 4
had need be covered all over with Cork-jackets not to sink--of these grievances the heroine is much the worst. Somebody has said that we never forgive perfection unless it be made properly wretched--Now this heroine is not wretched at all. She is a female Sir Charles GrandisonSir Charles Grandison
Title character of Samuel Richardson’s novel The History of Sir Charles Grandison. Became proverbial for an impossibly perfect ideal man and used by Mitford in this sense.--#lmw
with no cares but the sentimental conflicts of duty & love. How I do hate those over good book people. They are just like triple refined sugar sweet & bright & hard & spotless, & good for nothing till mixed with some powerful acid--good for nothing at all. Luckily we know how to skip (invaluable discovery, I wonder no one has ever written an essay in its praise) & GrizzyMiss Grizzy
Character in Marriage. Mitford’s favorite character from the novel; she admires the character’s portrayal and teasingly contemplates naming Sir William’s kitten after her.--#lmw
& JackyMiss Jacky
Character in Marriage; Mitford admires Ferrier’s characterization of her.--#lmw
make ample amends for the fair MaryMary
Heroine of Marriage. Mitford does not admire Ferrier’s depiction of her heroine, considering her to be too perfect, a "female Sir Charles Grandison."--#lmw
's sins of wisdom & virtue.--GrizzyMiss Grizzy
Character in Marriage. Mitford’s favorite character from the novel; she admires the character’s portrayal and teasingly contemplates naming Sir William’s kitten after her.--#lmw
is my favorite--I think I shall christen the white kittenWhite kitten Selima Grizzy
White kitten belonging to Mitford that she plans to give to Elford. The kitten’s father is Selim. Mitford variously proposes to name the kitten "Selima" (after the kitten’s father) or "Grizzy" (after the character in Ferrier’s novel Marriage). Unknown whether Elford eventually takes the kitten. More research needed.--#lmw
your kittenWhite kitten Selima Grizzy
White kitten belonging to Mitford that she plans to give to Elford. The kitten’s father is Selim. Mitford variously proposes to name the kitten "Selima" (after the kitten’s father) or "Grizzy" (after the character in Ferrier’s novel Marriage). Unknown whether Elford eventually takes the kitten. More research needed.--#lmw
--by that melodious name--Do you like it? Here am I talking of kittens & novels & Mr. NorthmoreThomas Northmore | Born: 1776 in Fulham, Middlesex. Died: 1851 in Furzebrook House, near Axminster.
An acquaintance of MRM. In a letter to Haydon dated 9 February 1824 , Mitford refers to Mr. Northmore as "a great Devonshire reformer, one of the bad epic poets and very pleasant men in which that country abounds" ( Life of Mary Russell Mitford ed. L’Estrange Vol II, page 22 ).--#kab
's & such like baubles & quite forgetting the opportunity I have to shew off & look grand & learned, & classical & critical, & bluer than a blue bag. Do you know that I am holding the responsible office of critic to a Volume of translations which a friend of mine--Mr. DickinsonCharles Dickinson, or: Mr. Dickinson | Born: 1755-03-06 in Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire, England. Died: 1827 in Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Friend of the Mitford family. Charles Dickinson was born on March 6, 1755 at Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire. He was the son of Vikris Dickinson and Elizabeth Marchant. The Dickinson family were Quakers who lived in the vicinity of Bristol, Gloucestershire. On August 3, 1807, he married Catherine Allingham at St Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived at Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where the Mitfords visited them. Charles Dickinson owned a private press he employed to print literary works by his friends (See letters to Elford from March 13, 1819 and June 21, 1820). Charles Dickinson died at Farley Hill in 1827.--#ajc #lmw
by the bye--is about to print at his private press as soon as ever they have undergone my last revisal? There's for you. Translations from DanteDurante Alighieri, or: Dante, Dante Alighieri | Born: 1265 in Florence, Tuscany, Italy. Died: 1321-09-14 in Ravenna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
--
--TassoTorquato Tasso | Born: 1544-03-11 in Sorrento, Kingdom of Naples. Died: 1595-04-25 in Rome, Papal States.
Tasso was a poet and courtier from Naples. He was the author of the pastoral drama Aminta (1573) and epic poem Gerusalemme Liberata (1574). Tasso’s life and work continued to be the subject of much attention during Mitford’s lifetime. Byron’s poem The Lament of Tasso, written in Florence, appeared in 1817 ; a translation of Gerusalemme Liberata in Spenserian stanzas by Jeremiah Holmes Wiffen appeared in 1821 ; Donizetti wrote an opera on the subject of Tasso in 1833 , incorporating some of the poet’s work into the libretto; and Franz Liszt composed a symphonic poem, Tasso, Lamento e Trionfo in commemoration of the centenary of Goethe’s birth in 1849 . --#lmw
--AriostoArisoto Ludovico | Born: 1474-09-08 in Reggio Emilia, Italy. Died: 1533-07-06 in Ferrara, Italy.
Italian poet, courtier, and diplomat; Author of the epic Orlando Furioso (1516), written in ottava rima. --#lmw
--PetrarchFrancesco Petrarca, or: Petrarch | Born: 1304-07-20 in Arezzo, Republic of Florence. Died: 1374-07-19 in Arquà, Republic of Venice.
Petrarch’s scholarship and poetry helped to initiate the Italian Renaissance. He investigated the learning of ancient Rome and rediscovered Cicero’s letters. In poetry he is most widely known for his sonnet cycle to an idealized woman, Laura. He was a friend of Cola di Rienzo.--#ebb
--OvidPublius Ovidius Naso, or: Ovid | Born: -0043-03-20 in Sulmo, Roman Empire; modern day Sulmona, Italy. Died: 0016-11-30 in Tomis, Scythia minor, Roman empire; modern day Constanta, Romania.
--
& VirgilPublius Vergilius Maro, or: Virgil | Born: -0070-10-15 in Virgilio, Lombardy. Died: -0020-09-21 in Brindisi, Italy.
--
. Very fine translations too--combining in a most extraordinary degree fidelity to the words & the spirit of the Author with the most flowing versification & the purest syle. The UgolinoCount Ugolino
Character from Dante’s Inferno. Guilty of treason.--#ncl #lmw
& IsabellaIsabella
Character from Dante’s Inferno.--#ncl #lmw
stories are superb. These Italian people are my old acquaintance--I was not quite so intimate with the Latin GentlemanPublius Vergilius Maro, or: Virgil | Born: -0070-10-15 in Virgilio, Lombardy. Died: -0020-09-21 in Brindisi, Italy.
--
--I had read DrydenJohn Dryden | Born: 1631-08-09 in Aldwincle, Northamptonshire, England. Died: 1700-05-01 in London, England.
Named Poet Laureate in 1668 , Dryden authored Annus mirabilis: the Year of Wonders, MDCLXVI in 1667 , reflecting on climactic events of the previous year, the Great Fire of London and the second Anglo-Dutch War. Dryden supported a revival of drama in Restoration England, and in 1668 he wrote Of Dramatick Poesie , which contained critiques of William Shakespeare’s and Ben Jonson’s plays and reflection on English and French theater and playwrights from the Renaissance to the Restoration in England. Several of his plays were staged in London in the 1670s, including his treatment of the Antony and Cleopatra narrative, in All for Love, or, The World Well Lost, performed in December 1677 and published in 1678 . His satirical poem Absalom and Achitophel, published in 1681, presents Restoration politicians and government figures in Old Testament roles, casting King Charles II in flattering terms as a merciful and benevolent David. --#ebb
's VirgilPublius Vergilius Maro, or: Virgil | Born: -0070-10-15 in Virgilio, Lombardy. Died: -0020-09-21 in Brindisi, Italy.
--
to be sure--but then it was a long time ago--& of Mr OvidPublius Ovidius Naso, or: Ovid | Born: -0043-03-20 in Sulmo, Roman Empire; modern day Sulmona, Italy. Died: 0016-11-30 in Tomis, Scythia minor, Roman empire; modern day Constanta, Romania.
--
I knew nothing at all. I have now had the honour of an introduction--to his tale of PhaetonPhaeton
Character in Metamorphoses, book two. Phaeton attempts to drive his father the Sun’s chariot and winged horses and must be killed by Jupiter when he loses control of the vehicle and endangers the earth.--#lmw
& I think him a very fine fellow indeed. I don't know anybody who talks so much magnificent nonsense--he goes far beyond Mr. SoutheyRobert Southey, Poet Laureate of England , or: Poet Laureate of England | Born: 1774-08-12 in Bristol, England. Died: 1843-03-21 in London, England.
--
--KehamaThe Curse of Kehama: A Poem in Two Volumes. Robert Southey . London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown. 1810. page 5
is "pale pink compared to the flaming scarlet" of the MetamorphosesMetamorphōseōn librī ["Books of Transformations"], The Metamorphoses. Ovid . 0008.
First translated into English by William Caxton in 1480. --#lmw
. The 4th AeneidThe Aeneid. Virgil .
Latin epic poem written between 29 and 19 BC.--#lmw
too surprised me with its matchless beauties & its in my mind intolerable faults. How VirgilPublius Vergilius Maro, or: Virgil | Born: -0070-10-15 in Virgilio, Lombardy. Died: -0020-09-21 in Brindisi, Italy.
--
could make his pious hero such a cold heartless abominable rascal--& his tender heroine such an incomparable fool passes my comprehension. In the critical readings which passed between Mr & Mrs Dickinson & myself we of course did not fail to compare Mr DCharles Dickinson, or: Mr. Dickinson | Born: 1755-03-06 in Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire, England. Died: 1827 in Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Friend of the Mitford family. Charles Dickinson was born on March 6, 1755 at Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire. He was the son of Vikris Dickinson and Elizabeth Marchant. The Dickinson family were Quakers who lived in the vicinity of Bristol, Gloucestershire. On August 3, 1807, he married Catherine Allingham at St Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived at Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where the Mitfords visited them. Charles Dickinson owned a private press he employed to print literary works by his friends (See letters to Elford from March 13, 1819 and June 21, 1820). Charles Dickinson died at Farley Hill in 1827.--#ajc #lmw
's translations with those of others--PittChristopher Pitt | Born: 1699. Died: 1748-04-13.
--
's--DrydenJohn Dryden | Born: 1631-08-09 in Aldwincle, Northamptonshire, England. Died: 1700-05-01 in London, England.
Named Poet Laureate in 1668 , Dryden authored Annus mirabilis: the Year of Wonders, MDCLXVI in 1667 , reflecting on climactic events of the previous year, the Great Fire of London and the second Anglo-Dutch War. Dryden supported a revival of drama in Restoration England, and in 1668 he wrote Of Dramatick Poesie , which contained critiques of William Shakespeare’s and Ben Jonson’s plays and reflection on English and French theater and playwrights from the Renaissance to the Restoration in England. Several of his plays were staged in London in the 1670s, including his treatment of the Antony and Cleopatra narrative, in All for Love, or, The World Well Lost, performed in December 1677 and published in 1678 . His satirical poem Absalom and Achitophel, published in 1681, presents Restoration politicians and government figures in Old Testament roles, casting King Charles II in flattering terms as a merciful and benevolent David. --#ebb
's--& BeresfordJames Beresford | Born: 1764-05-28 in Upham, Hampshire, England. Died: 1840-11-29 in Kibworth, England .
--
's--which ^last has without intending it all the merit of a travestie. In the finest part of DidoDido
Character from Virgil’s Aeneid; Aeneas’s wife.--#lmw
's passion where she talks of sacrificing her faithless lover--immolating his son & so forth--Mr. BeresfordJames Beresford | Born: 1764-05-28 in Upham, Hampshire, England. Died: 1840-11-29 in Kibworth, England .
--
very quietly makes her say--"Why should not I smile as kill AscaniusAscanius
Character from Virgil’s Aeneid --#lmw
& Dish him to his father?" This Mr. BeresfordJames Beresford | Born: 1764-05-28 in Upham, Hampshire, England. Died: 1840-11-29 in Kibworth, England .
--
was no other than the Author of the "Miseries"The Miseries of Human Life, Or the Last Groans of Timothy Testy and Samuel Sensitive; with a few supplementary sighs from Mrs. Testy. With which are now for the first time Interspersed, Varieties, Incidental to the Principal Matter, In Prose and Verse. In Nine Additional Dialogues, as Overheard by James Beresford, A.M. Fellow of Merton-College, Oxford. James Beresford . London: William Miller. 1807. &c--& this doughty Translation is subscribed for by a[Gap: reason: torn.][ll]OxfordOxford, Oxfordshire, England | Oxford | Oxfordshire | England | 51.7520209 -1.2577263000000585 | County town of Oxfordshire, in the south east of England about twenty-five miles from Reading. Site of Oxford University.--#lmw51.7520209 -1.2577263000000585 & half CambridgeCambridge, Cambridgeshire, England | Cambridge Cambridgeshire England | 52.205337 0.12181699999996454 | City on the river Cam, north of London, in Cambridgeshire. Location of Cambridge University.--#lmw52.205337 0.12181699999996454--I think they ought  and yet to have known be[Gap: reason: torn.][tter]. Don't you?--

Wednesda[Gap: reason: torn.][y] My FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
did not go to LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 & [Gap: reason: torn.][Mr.]PalmerCharles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
is returned--^& we shan't to use the words of a Blacksmith Friend who wrote to the Votary of Vulcan on the occasion--"Our Frend Charls Fish Palmer is got a good seet--& hopes he'll keep it."--He is to make his grand Entree into ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 Tomorrow--bells are to be rung--bonfires made--houses illuminated--& that his Victory may be graced in all possible ways he shall have the honour of franking this letter--I am very glad he has beaten Mr. WeylandJohn Weyland, or: Mr. Weyland
On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland (395 votes.) . --#ajc
--but I hope he'll give up the Pension.[3] Palmer's wife MadalinaMadelina Madalina Sinclair Palmer, the Lady, or: Lady M.P., Lady Mad., Lady Madelina Palmer | Born: 1772-06-19 in Gordon Castle, Bellie, Moray, Scotland. Died: 1847 in Chapel Street, Grosvenor Place, London, England.
Lady Madelina Gordon was born on June 10, 1772, the daughter of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon, and Jane Maxwell, at Gordon Castle, Bellie, Moray, Scotland. Her first husband was Robert Sinclair, 7th Baronet Sinclair; they married in 1789 and had one child, John Gordon Sinclair. Her second husband was the Reading Whig politician Charles Fyshe Palmer. They married in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire. They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country. Her sister Charlotte Gordon became Duchess of Richmond through her marriage to Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond, 4th Duke of Lennox and 4th Duke of Aubigny. Her sister Susan Gordon became Duchess of Manchester through her marriage to William Montagu, Duke of Manchester. Her sister Louise Gordon became Marchioness Cornwallis through marriage to Charles Cornwallis, Marquess of Cornwallis. Her sister Georgiana Gordon became Duchess of Bedford through marriage to John Russell, Duke of Bedford. Her brothers were George Duncan Gordon, who became 5th Duke of Gordon, and Lord Alexander Gordon. Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. Lady Madelina’s name is variously spelled Madelina and Madalina, although Madelina appears to be the more common and standard spellling of the name, as an anglicization of the French Madeline. For more on the Palmers, see note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning .--#kab #ebb #ad #lmw
received a state pension and it was a point of contention during the election and after, as to whether or not an M.P.'s wife should accept one.—#lmw

Now you must write very soon & tell me that the jujubie (is that right?) has cured your cough--that you are coming ^toLondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 this Spring--& about the time you are likely to see us--for I will take care to be at home & bespeak the nightingales--Adieu my dear Friend--PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
& MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
join in kindest remembrances & I am always

most affectionately your'syoursM. R. MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb

LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223March Twenty nine
1819
Sr Wm Elford BartWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw

BickhamBickham, Somerset, England | Bickham | Somerset | England | 51.163534 -3.506621999999993 | Hamlet near Plymouth, and residence of Sir William Elford, who lived there until the failure of his finances in 1825 forced him eventually to sell his family’s estate. He sold his property in Bickham in 1831 and moved to The Priory, in Totnes, Devon the house of his daughter (Elizabeth) and son-in-law.--#ebb #lmw51.163534 -3.506621999999993
Charles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
CFPalmerPlymouthPlymouth, Devonshire, England | Plymouth | Devonshire | England | 50.3754565 -4.14265649999993 | City on the coast of Devonshire. After declines in the seventeenth century, increasingly important from the late eighteenth century into the nineteenth as a seaport, site of trade and emigration to and from the Americas, and a center of shipbuilding. Birthplace of Benjamin Robert Haydon. Sir William Elford was also born nearby at Bickham. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, from its founding in 1782, and he was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth and served from 1796 to 1806.--#ebb #lmw50.3754565 -4.14265649999993