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Letter to Mary WebbMary Elizabeth Webb, or: Mary Elizabeth Webb | Born: 1796-04-15 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: .
Close friend and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Mary Webb was born about 1796, the daughter of James Webb, Esq., and Jane Elizabeth Ogbourn. Baptized on April 15, 1796 in Wokingham, Berkshire. Sister of Elizabeth (called "Eliza") and Jane Eleanor Webb and niece of the elder Mary Webb, "Aunt Mary". In Needham’s papers, he notes from the Berkshire Directorythat she lived on Broad street, presumably in Wokingham, Berkshire. She was the wife of Thomas Hawkins, Esq., as she is referred to thus in probate papers of 1858 regarding the wills of her sister Eliza Webb Walter and her husband Henry Walter. Date of death unknown. More research needed.--#scw #lmw
, July 5, 1819

Edited by Catherine Cox.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 29 May 2015. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: DSCF8963.jpg, DSCF8964.jpg, DSCF8965.jpg, DSCF8966.jpg, DSCF8967.jpg, DSCF8968.jpg, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark:

Single sheet of paper, four surfaces photographed.Address leaf bears no postmarks.Paper badly foxed.Sheet (pages three and four) torn on right edge of page three where wax seal was removed.Red wax seal, complete, adhered to upper edge of page four.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
[ early5 July, 1819]Monday Eveng

My FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
is going to ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 tomorrow to take MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
to hear the Bishop of SalisburyJohn Fisher, or: Bishop of Exeter, Bishop of Salisbury | Born: 1748. Died: 1825-05-08.
Bishop of Exeter and then Bishop of Salisbury from 1807-1825. Art collector and patron of John Constable. --#lmw
preach & hopes to get the Tom CribTom Crib’s Memorial to Congress. Thomas Moore . London: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme and Brown. 1819. for our own dear Miss WebbMary Elizabeth Webb, or: Mary Elizabeth Webb | Born: 1796-04-15 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: .
Close friend and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Mary Webb was born about 1796, the daughter of James Webb, Esq., and Jane Elizabeth Ogbourn. Baptized on April 15, 1796 in Wokingham, Berkshire. Sister of Elizabeth (called "Eliza") and Jane Eleanor Webb and niece of the elder Mary Webb, "Aunt Mary". In Needham’s papers, he notes from the Berkshire Directorythat she lived on Broad street, presumably in Wokingham, Berkshire. She was the wife of Thomas Hawkins, Esq., as she is referred to thus in probate papers of 1858 regarding the wills of her sister Eliza Webb Walter and her husband Henry Walter. Date of death unknown. More research needed.--#scw #lmw
In this hope I sit down to thank you all my dear & kind friends for notes past & present--I being just now in debt all round--to thank you all & to beg you to look on this as an answer general. The first thing is pleasing to hear that one dear Friend is not worse--I hope this journey to LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 will make him much better--relieve his mind & and heal his body--The next thing in this "mingled yarn"[1] A quotation from All's Well that Ends WellAll’s Well that Ends Well. William Shakespeare.
Drama likely first performed around 1604 and first printed in 1623.--#lmw
: "The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together" (Act 4, scene 3).—#lmw
is regret for the lost broach--I still think you will find it. Did I never tell you how LucyLucy Sweatser Hill | Born: 1790-05-02 in Stratfield Saye, Berkshire, England. Died: .
Beloved servant for twelve years in the Mitford household who, on 7 August 1820 married Charles Hill. She is the basis for the title character in the Our Village story. Source: Needham Papers, Reading Central Library. --#scw
& I found a broach of my Grandmother's with PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
's hair which I had lost for eight months? We found it--guess where--in my empty purse--where for that eight months aforesaid it had been sole inhabitant.--The next thing is to ask if you have page 2
heard of Mr. DickinsonCharles Dickinson, or: Mr. Dickinson | Born: 1755-03-06 in Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire, England. Died: 1827 in Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Friend of the Mitford family. Charles Dickinson was born on March 6, 1755 at Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire. He was the son of Vikris Dickinson and Elizabeth Marchant. The Dickinson family were Quakers who lived in the vicinity of Bristol, Gloucestershire. On August 3, 1807, he married Catherine Allingham at St Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived at Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where the Mitfords visited them. Charles Dickinson owned a private press he employed to print literary works by his friends (See letters to Elford from March 13, 1819 and June 21, 1820). Charles Dickinson died at Farley Hill in 1827.--#ajc #lmw
's bad accident? He was thrown from his horse on Friday & his left shoulder dislocated. Mr. JacksonMr. Jackson Jackson Mr.
In Mitford’s letter of July 5, 1819, she mentions Mr. Jackson as the surgeon who unsuccessfully attempts to treat Charles Dickinson’s shoulder dislocation. More research needed.--#lmw
as the nearest surgeon was sent for to reduce the dislocation--He & 6 men tugged at him for three hours without success--they then sent for Mr. Markley who very speedily & skilfully accomplished it. Thank God Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
was away! PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
saw him on Sunday & is in perfect admiration of his patience & philosophy[2] As in Stoicism.—#csc--There is nothing I admire so much as that sort of passive courage--the courage of endurance--the only courage that belongs exclusively to the human animal. That of fighting they share with braver brutes.--

I had a charming letter from Miss JamesElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
yesterday--She is just now consoling her MotherSusan Susannah James Haycock, or: Mrs. James | Born: . Died: .
Susan or Susannah Haycock, wife of Thomas James and mother of Elizabeth Mary James, Susan James, and Emily James. She was born about 1754 and was baptized at Bath Abbey, Bath, Somerset on October 17, 1754, the daughter of Joseph and Mary Haycock. She married Thomas James on June 22, 1773 at Bath, Somerset. Date of death unknown, but based on census records, it is likely to have been before 1841.--#lmw
for the loss of SusySusan Susy Deane James | Born: . Died: 1860-12-27 in 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey.
Friend of Mary Russell Mitford, and sister to Elizabeth James and Emily James and cared for pupils with her. She was born about 1788 in Bath, Somerset, the daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. She was baptized on October 3, 1788 at the parish of St. James, Bath, Somerset. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. In 1819, Mitford reports in her letters that Susan has taken a position as a governess, and refers to her by the nickname "Susy." After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two sisters in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. She died on December 27, 1860, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey.--#lmw
who is gone to reside with a family at the LakesThe Lake District, England | The Lakes | Lakeland | Lake District | Cumberland | Westmorland | Lancashire | England | 54.46365264504479 -3.0926513671875 | Region in northwest England famous for its lakes, forests, and mountains (or fells) and its associations with the early 19th century writings of William Wordsworth and the other "Lake" Poets or "Lakers," as they were sometimes called. In Mitford’s time, the Lake District was spread across Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire; the present-day Lake District is now entirely in Cumbria. The highest mountain in England, Scafell Pike, lies within this region, as do the deepest and longest lakes in England, Wastwater and Windermere.--#lmw54.46365264504479 -3.0926513671875--gone I mean as a Governess--They send a thousand loves to you all--She wants to see me she says very much--but only think of her impudence!--She does not want me to meet Mr. MauriceMr. Maurice
Unknown person named in Mitford’s 5 July 1819 letter to Mary Webb. Further research needed.--#lmw
because she says "there is page 3
is [3] Mitford repeats a word here over the page break.—#lmwa freebooting spirit about him which I should draw out & cherish to the extinction of graver things." Theres a pretty opinion for you! A fine specimen of partiality truly! I do really believe that she thinks of me as Edie OchiltreeEdie Ochiltree
character in The Antiquary.--#esh
said of himself--that "I should be a very bad example in any well regulated family"--but so it is--I am misused past endurance. Mrs. RowdenFrances Arabella St. Quentin Rowden | Born: 1774 in London. Died: 1840.
English school teacher, author, and Mitford tutor. Also taught Caroline Lamb, Fanny Kemble, and L.E.L.. Worked at M. St. Quentin School at 22 Hans Place, London, where Mary Russell Mitford attended as a student, and where she in company with Rowden, attended plays at the London theatres. The St. Quentin school at Hans Place was founded by Dominique de St. Quentin, a French emigre, whose name (and the school’s name) is spelled "Quintin" in the L’Estrange edition of Mitford’s letters. St. Quentin and his wife, Ann Pitts, originally ran a school in Reading, where he first hired Frances Rowden to teach, but according to the ODNB, St. Quentin had to sell the Reading school due to gambling debts he accumulated in the company of Richard Valpy and George Mitford. When the St. Quentins moved to Paris following Napoleon’s defeat, Rowden followed them there in 1818 and started a school at the rue d’Angoulême which later moved to Champs-Elysées , and it was in her Paris school that she taught Fanny Kemble between 1821 and 1825 . After the death of St. Quentin’s wife, Frances Rowden married him in 1825 but little is known of her following this point, and the ODNB indicates that the death date of 1840 supplied for her is speculative. In The Queens of Society by Grace and Philip Wharton, the authors note that, while unmarried, Frances Rowden "styled herself Mrs. Rowden" (1860: 148). Rowden wrote poetry, including Poetical Introduction to the Study of Botany (1801) and The Pleasures of Friendship: A Poem, in two parts (1810, rpt. 1812, 1818); also wrote textbooks, including A Christian Wreath for the Pagan Dieties (1820, illus. Caroline Lamb), and A Biographical Sketch of the Most Distinguished Writers of Ancient and Modern Times (1821, illus. Caroline Lamb). (See Landon Memoirs; See also L’Estrange, ed. The Life of Mary Russell Mitford: Told by Herself, Volume I, pages 11-17 . --#lmw #ebb
forsooth saith that "my wickedness is of a peculiarly dangerous character--it is so catching"--And this Mary WebbMary Elizabeth Webb, or: Mary Elizabeth Webb | Born: 1796-04-15 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: .
Close friend and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Mary Webb was born about 1796, the daughter of James Webb, Esq., and Jane Elizabeth Ogbourn. Baptized on April 15, 1796 in Wokingham, Berkshire. Sister of Elizabeth (called "Eliza") and Jane Eleanor Webb and niece of the elder Mary Webb, "Aunt Mary". In Needham’s papers, he notes from the Berkshire Directorythat she lived on Broad street, presumably in Wokingham, Berkshire. She was the wife of Thomas Hawkins, Esq., as she is referred to thus in probate papers of 1858 regarding the wills of her sister Eliza Webb Walter and her husband Henry Walter. Date of death unknown. More research needed.--#scw #lmw
is the worst sauce box of all. Oh dear me! What will become of me--with all these wicked wits upon me--and I such a poor harm[Gap: 4 word, reason: torn.][less] civil-spoken person with no soul to take my part!--I assure you MaryMary Elizabeth Webb, or: Mary Elizabeth Webb | Born: 1796-04-15 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: .
Close friend and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Mary Webb was born about 1796, the daughter of James Webb, Esq., and Jane Elizabeth Ogbourn. Baptized on April 15, 1796 in Wokingham, Berkshire. Sister of Elizabeth (called "Eliza") and Jane Eleanor Webb and niece of the elder Mary Webb, "Aunt Mary". In Needham’s papers, he notes from the Berkshire Directorythat she lived on Broad street, presumably in Wokingham, Berkshire. She was the wife of Thomas Hawkins, Esq., as she is referred to thus in probate papers of 1858 regarding the wills of her sister Eliza Webb Walter and her husband Henry Walter. Date of death unknown. More research needed.--#scw #lmw
dear that I was not home a moment too soon--MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
's first salutation was that she had always given me up--the ride was very pleasant but so cold that we were forced to have a fire to thaw ourselves--quite unheard of on the 5th of July.--MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
is better--so much better that she talks of going into the Vale next week when PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
goes to the Sessions. page 4
I hope you mean to come & see me--Let me know on Saturday when I may look out for my dearest visitors, as well as as how your dear FatherJames Webb | Born: 1769 in Hurley, Berkshire, England. Died: 1822-01-11 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Born about 1769 and baptized on February 19, 1769 in Hurley, Berkshire. Prominent manufacturer in the Wokinghambrewing industry, and community leader in Woking and the county of Berkshire. Father of Eliza, Jane, and Mary Webb, and brother (or brother-in-law) of his daughters’ "Aunt Mary," another Mary Webb. Francis Needham suggested that he was the original of the "gentleman" in the Our Villagesketch "Aunt Martha" . Sources: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 16 June 1953 . Needham Papers, Reading Central Library . --#scw #lmw
continues.--Poor Penelope ValpyPenelope Arabella French Valpy, or: Penelope Arabella Valpy, Penelope Valpy French | Born: 1798 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1869-03-17 in Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire, England.
One of the daughters of Dr. Valpy by his second wife Mary Benwell, born in 1798. She was baptized on June 15, 1798 at St. Lawrence, Reading, Berkshire. Penelope Arabella was youngest Valpy child to live to adulthood (a younger sister, Elizabeth Charlotte, died as an infant). She married the Rev. Peter French on October 13, 1823 on the same day that her sister Catherine married the Rev. Philip Filleul. The family lived in Burton upon Trent, Staffordshire, where Penelope also died on March 17, 1869, and was buried. They had five sons and three daughters. Penelope and Peter’s first child, Thomas Valpy French was born on 1 January 1825 and became the first Anglican Bishop of Lahore (now northwestern India and Pakistan).--#ebb #mco #lmw
is very ill still--the medical men are very much alarmed--Adieu my very dear friends--kindest love to all from all--


Ever most faithfully your'syours
M.R. Mitford.Mary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb

To

Miss Webb