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Letter to Mrs. MitfordMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
, 1819 December 10

Edited by Lisa M. Wilson.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 26 April 2015. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: P1020340.jpg, P1020341.jpg, P1020342.jpg, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff.392

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
11Bertram HouseBertram House, Berkshire, England | Grazeley | Berkshire | England | | Mansion built by George Mitford for his family residence, begun in April 1802 and completed in June 1804, after tearing down the previous house on the property, Grazeley Court Farm, a farmhouse about three miles outside of Reading, in the hamlet of Grazeley. George Mitford named his new house after a knight from the reign of William the Conqueror, Sir Robert de Bertram, who had married Sibella Mitford, daughter of Sir John de Mitford (source: Vera Watson). This estate signified George Mitford’s status as a land-owning country gentleman. Prior to this time, the Mitford family lived in Alresford and then in Reading. The family removed from Bertram House in April 1820, after financial reverses forced the family to sell the property.--#ebb #lmwDecember 10th. To Mrs. MitfordMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw

I wonder whether Mr. Woodburn has taken his departure this snowy morning, my own dear GrannyMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
! If so, he will have a sad journey--Of that however I am not so much afraid as that he will seize the weather as a good excuse.--I hope & trust that you will not think of coming home in the snow out of complaisance to my birthday--Much as we long to have you back again you must not risk catching cold in the transportation.--I hope you find your cloth gown comfortable & that you have worn my shawl constantly--Have you done a frill? Does it look pretty? You must want something of the sort to wear by this time I think--though I suppose they wash in WinchesterWinchester, Hampshire, England | Winchester | Hampshire | England | 51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 | City and county town of Hampshire. Site of Winchester Cathedral and Winchester College, one of the oldest public grammar schools. Jane Austen died here and is buried in the Cathedral. John Keats wrote several of his best-known poems while on a visit to the city.--#lmw51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 though they do not keep netting needles--The only thing about which LucyLucy Sweatser Hill | Born: 1790-05-02 in Stratfield Saye, Berkshire, England. Died: .
Beloved servant for twelve years in the Mitford household who, on 7 August 1820 married Charles Hill. She is the basis for the title character in the Our Village story. Source: Needham Papers, Reading Central Library. --#scw
is troubled is your nightcap which she says can't be washed because you have no change--I dare say however you borrowed one of Mrs. Woodburn.--I have a letter from Fyshe to day to whom, in enclosing a letter to forward to Sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
last Sunday, I had mentioned your not having received that I sent to you--Fyshe's letter is not particularly civil I think--though perhaps the man only means to be funny & does not know how--It is not every body that can combine playfulness with goodbreeding.--At all events the delay was his as he confesses.--So I shall never trust any Despatch that requires dispatch to his punctuality--He seems to have taken a lesson in writing from his friend Dr. Parr--half his words one is forced to guess at--he literally "writes as ill as a Member of Parliament."--I have had a superb present from Mr. John ValpyAbraham John Valpy, or: Abraham John Valpy | Born: 1786-10-30 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-11-19 in St. John’s Wood Road, London, England.
Abraham John Valpy, called "John" or "A.J." Dr. Richard Valpy’s second son, Abraham John was born about 1786 and was baptized on October 30, 1786 in Reading, Berkshire. He was educated at Reading School and then matriculated at Pembroke College, Oxford on April 25, 1805; from that institution, he received his B.A. (1809) and M.A. (1811) and was appointed a Fellow for a short time in 1811. According to the DNB, he was "bound apprentice to a freeman of London, Humphrey Gregory Pridden," a printer. He was admitted a Liveryman of the Stationer’s Company in London in 1807. He worked as a printer-publisher and editor, and owned premises in London at 21 Tooke’s Court, Cursitor Street (1811) and later at Red Lion Court, Fleet Street (1821). He published numerous works of ancient and modern literature, and was the printer and publisher of periodical The Museum (1822-1825). He worked with E.H. Barker of Thetford, George Burges, George Dyer, and T.S. Hughes. He retired from the publishing industry in 1837. On February 25, 1813 he married Harriet Wylde at Burrington, Somerset. John and Harriet Wylde lived in greater London and died without issue. John died on November 19, 1854 at St. John’s Wood Road, London, and is buried at All Soul’s, Kensal Green, London. --#lmw #ebb
--a fine thick grand quarto volume--printed upon wire wove paper & hotpressed page 1
the book has but one fault--the small fault of being totally unreadable. It is an English Poem by a German Gentleman called Time or Light & Shade--And seems in all points a very fit companion to a certain work called Cyllenius--I intend to make Mr. DickinsonCharles Dickinson, or: Mr. Dickinson | Born: 1755-03-06 in Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire, England. Died: 1827 in Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Friend of the Mitford family. Charles Dickinson was born on March 6, 1755 at Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire. He was the son of Vikris Dickinson and Elizabeth Marchant. The Dickinson family were Quakers who lived in the vicinity of Bristol, Gloucestershire. On August 3, 1807, he married Catherine Allingham at St Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived at Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where the Mitfords visited them. Charles Dickinson owned a private press he employed to print literary works by his friends (See letters to Elford from March 13, 1819 and June 21, 1820). Charles Dickinson died at Farley Hill in 1827.--#ajc #lmw
read it & expect to be exceedingly amused by his strictures--He'll pull it to pieces just as muh as if Cyllenius was not made of such stuff--"A fellow feeling makes us wondrous kind"--may be a true axiom in some cases but not in poetry.--You will be glad to hear that Kate Valpy is better--the Doctor was going to dine at the which was held at Jacobs--& Jacob pressed Drum very much to dine with them--but Drum is inexpressibly good he had never dined in Reading except the once we dined togehter at Dr. Valpy's & indeed I think goes in a morning only to get me books. You have no notion how well we get on. --I have got two new numbers of BlackwoodBlackwood’s Magazine. 1817-04-1980.
Founded as a Tory magazine in opposition to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review.--#ebb
.--The rest of the Tent is capital.--Dr. Parr courses there.--& Prince Leopold--they make famous use of the Doctor.--That is famous Inn--There certainly is an originality & audacity of impudence about Messrs Lockhart and Wilson. more musing than anything that can be imagined. I shall keep there two numbers for you to read.--Jacob was so much better that he did not go to Mr. Arnott.--Have a great number of Bobbies coming every day to be fed, which is a great delight poor little lamsb I don't know what they would do without by bounty--unless something in your Sunday's letter--(for you must write Sunday my dear Granny) should require it I shall not write again--Good bye my own dear darling--Kind regards to dear Mrs. Woodburn.

Ever most fondly your own
M. R> Mitford

Lucy and Molly desire their duty.