Maintained by: Elisa E. Beshero-Bondar (ebb8 at pitt.edu) Creative Commons LicenseLast modified: 2018-04-24T18:59:56.483-04:00

Our default is the Diplomatic view.
Click to toggle the Normalized view
(shows conventional spellings;
hides pagebreaks, insertion marks, and deletions):

Letter to Sir William ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
, March 20, 1820.

Edited by Amy Colombo.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 5 June 2014. P5. . .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2014.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central Library.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 400

Two folio sheets of paper, folded in half, with correspondence on recto and verso 1-4; one folio sheet of paper with correspondence on recto and verso 5-6. There is a gap on page 6 intended for an address. The pages are folded in half and thirds twice more and were sealed for posting. It appears that pages 1-4 are two large sheets folded in half; the last page (5-6) is one sheet. This letter is glued into a scrapbook. Address leaf (back of page 5) bears a black circular wax stamp; there is a mileage stamp readingREADING
[Gap: reason: illegible.].Address leaf is written in another hand.Page 5/6: has a piece torn away on the side of the page and a small hole is seen above the wax seal on page 6; there is a small tear on the bottom. This page is also wrinkled - possibly due to the seal.Black wax seal on page 6.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford's spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford's spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements "choice," "sic," and "reg" to encode both Mitford's spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
To Sir W. ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw

Bertram HouseBertram House, Berkshire, England | Grazeley | Berkshire | England | | Mansion built by George Mitford for his family residence, begun in April 1802 and completed in June 1804, after tearing down the previous house on the property, Grazeley Court Farm, a farmhouse about three miles outside of Reading, in the hamlet of Grazeley. George Mitford named his new house after a knight from the reign of William the Conqueror, Sir Robert de Bertram, who had married Sibella Mitford, daughter of Sir John de Mitford (source: Vera Watson). This estate signified George Mitford’s status as a land-owning country gentleman. Prior to this time, the Mitford family lived in Alresford and then in Reading. The family removed from Bertram House in April 1820, after financial reverses forced the family to sell the property.--#ebb #lmw
March 20 th 1820

The first part of your delightful letter, my dear Sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
, to which I shall reply is your supposition respecting Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
. You never were so much mistaken in your life. She has the finest & the prettiest little girlFrances Vikris Dickinson | Born: 1820-03-07 in Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, England. Died: 1898-10-26 in Siena, Toscana, Italy.
Frances Dickinson was the only child of Charles Dickinson and Catherine Allingham. She was born on 7 March 1820 at Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, and was baptized on April 17. Her father Charles died when she was seven years old. She died at Siena, Toscana, Italy on October, 26 1898 and is buried in Rome. She was married to and divorced from her first husband, John Edward Geils (1813-1894) and later married the Rev. Gilbert Elliott (1800-1891). --#ajc #lmw
that ever was seen, & is herself quite well--that is "as well as can be expected." The young lady is quite a beauty & will be a fortnight old tomorrow--I did not think it possible for so young a child to be so pretty--perhaps I did not think it possible for me to be so interested in a young child--but really every bodyeverybody calls this brat lovely--its PapaCharles Dickinson, or: Mr. Dickinson | Born: 1755-03-06 in Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire, England. Died: 1827 in Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Friend of the Mitford family. Charles Dickinson was born on March 6, 1755 at Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire. He was the son of Vikris Dickinson and Elizabeth Marchant. The Dickinson family were Quakers who lived in the vicinity of Bristol, Gloucestershire. On August 3, 1807, he married Catherine Allingham at St Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived at Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where the Mitfords visited them. Charles Dickinson owned a private press he employed to print literary works by his friends (See letters to Elford from March 13, 1819 and June 21, 1820). Charles Dickinson died at Farley Hill in 1827.--#ajc #lmw
--its MamaCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
--its GrandmamaGrandmama Dickinson
More research needed. Frances Dickinson’s paternal grandmother, Elizabeth Marchant Dickinson, died in 1790, and is therefore an unlikely candidate.--#lmw
--its nurseDickinson Nurse--& I who stand for a sort of maiden Aunt I think it loveliest of all--quite a She-CupidCupid Eros
Classical god of sexual desire and erotic love, known as Eros in ancient Greece and Cupid in ancient Rome.--#ebb
.--After all your supposition was far from being unreasonable--for Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
had made so great a mistake as to the time that half the neighbourhood was of your opinion.--The next important event was our election--Has your neighbour Sir John SinclairJohn Sinclair, Sir, baronet | Born: 1754-05-10 in Thurso Castle, Thurso, Caithness. Died: 1835-12-21 in 133 George Street, Edinburgh.
Sir John Sinclair was perhaps most politically active in the 1780s and 1790s when he represented the district of Caithness and moved to organize an independent body of non-partisan parliamentarians. He took a great interest in political and agricultural economics of England and Scotland and published a History of the Public Revenue of Great Britain in two volumes in 1784 with additions in 1789. In 1790 he proposed the idea of a detailed parish-by-parish study of local geography, history, and community culture which became the 21-volume Statistical Account of Scotland .(Source: ODNB)--#ajc #ebb
told you of this desperate contest--this struggle for life ^& death? It lasted 6 days--during the three last of which not more than thirty votes were polled on all sides--never to be sure were voters so filtered out drop by drop--Every unpolled elector was known on all sides--& the obstinate who would not vote--the fearful who dared not--the sick who could not, were assailed morning noon & night by the persuasions & exhortations of the candidates & their committees--Very little men were of great consequence during those three days--"Has Philips voted yet?""How is Butlerpage 2
this morning?" were the common salutations amongst committee men & fair ladies[.][1] Here Mitford's dash appears to terminate the sentence.—#ebb--Now Philips was a Mill wrightmillwright desperately poor who tugged at on all sides deserted his house & home to escape the certainty of offending his employers on one side or other--& ButlerButler
A Reading shop owner and Palmerite mentioned in Mitford’s discussion of the Reading elections in her letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820. --#ajc
a sick PalmeritePalmerite
Supporter of Charles Fyshe Palmer in the Reading elections of March 16, 1820.--#ajc
who kept a little shop & was nursed & guarded by a WeylanditeWeylandite
Weyland supporter; On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.)http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading--#ajc
wife who at last not content with locking up her husband fairly flung the PalmerCharles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
letters in the face of the messengers--so a long head of our party despairing to rescue him from her clutches paired him off with a sick WeylanditeWeylandite
Weyland supporter; On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.)http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading--#ajc
.--All this time I have not told you who the Candidates were --Mr. PalmerCharles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
the old Member--Mr. WeylandJohn Weyland, or: Mr. Weyland
On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland (395 votes.) . --#ajc
the old Candidate--& Mr. MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
an opposition man of large fortune brought from FranceFrance | 46.227638 2.213749000000007 | Country in western Europe. Paris is the capital and largest city.--#bas46.227638 2.213749000000007 in a fit of patriotism by our celebrated shoemaker & Patriot Mr. WarryJoseph Warry | Born: 1775-11-08 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1822-08-04 in Reading, Berkshire, England.
Radical Whig trademan with premises at Minster Street, Reading, who went to France in 1820 to convince John Berkeley Monck to return to England to stand for election as one of the Members of Parliament for Reading. Mitford refers to him as "our celebrated shoemaker & Patriot" in a 20 March 1820 letter. Historical directories indicate that Warry was a bootmaker and a member of the Reading Freemason’s Lodge. His father, also Joseph Warry (1733-1801), was also a shoemaker. --#lmw #scw
. Mr. MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
is one of the best men that ever lived--a clever man--our old & most intimate friend--he has been abroad for 8 years & a half & yet--I was most thoroughly sorry to see him. The truth is that sending for him was an act of madness--Parties are so nearly balanced in ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 that it is impossible for two ministerial or two opposition men to sit quietly--& the compromise which was desired by all but a few têtes exaltees of bringing in Mr. PalmerCharles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
&Mr. WeylandJohn Weyland, or: Mr. Weyland
On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland (395 votes.) . --#ajc
without a contest was the only thing that could have ensured the peace of the Borough. At present by desperate & despairing exertions the two opposition men are come in--but another time one must go out--& that one (don't tell Sir John SinclairJohn Sinclair, Sir, baronet | Born: 1754-05-10 in Thurso Castle, Thurso, Caithness. Died: 1835-12-21 in 133 George Street, Edinburgh.
Sir John Sinclair was perhaps most politically active in the 1780s and 1790s when he represented the district of Caithness and moved to organize an independent body of non-partisan parliamentarians. He took a great interest in political and agricultural economics of England and Scotland and published a History of the Public Revenue of Great Britain in two volumes in 1784 with additions in 1789. In 1790 he proposed the idea of a detailed parish-by-parish study of local geography, history, and community culture which became the 21-volume Statistical Account of Scotland .(Source: ODNB)--#ajc #ebb
) must be Mr. PalmerCharles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
, against whom the run was this time, & whose purse is in no condition to stand these repeated contests, & whose conduct has been so fair so pure so honourable that it quite breaks one's heart to think of his being cast asidepage 3
in a fit of caprice--no not caprice a cold calculation made in the very spirit of trade--that a rich Member living in the neighbourhood is better than one less rich who lives at a distance. In the meanwhile all ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 is experiencing the double evils of a beginning & a finished election--all the malice hatred envy & ill will of the one, combined with the restless activity, the perpetual talking, the threatening promising & canvassing of the other. Mr. WeylandJohn Weyland, or: Mr. Weyland
On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland (395 votes.) . --#ajc
had no sooner lost his election by five votes, made his mob drunk, & takes himself off, than his party began to organiseorganize Committees in all the Parishes for the purpose of securing the Independence & so forth of the Borough at the next election which of course was instantly met by counter Committees for the exactly same purpose on the other side.--I love Mr. MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
(always with his wife's permission)--I like Mr. PalmerCharles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
--& I don't like Mr. WeylandJohn Weyland, or: Mr. Weyland
On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland (395 votes.) . --#ajc
who is a puritan of the very first water, & yet I very sincerely wish that Mr. MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
was back at ToursTours, Indre-et-Loire, France | Tours | Indre-et-Loire | France | 47.394144 0.6848400000000083 | City in France on the lower part of the River Loire. --#ebb47.394144 0.6848400000000083 & Mr. WeylandJohn Weyland, or: Mr. Weyland
On March 16, 1820, an election in Reading was held. There were three candidates: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland (395 votes.) . --#ajc
quietly in ParliamentParliament
Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; supreme legislative body in England. --#ajc
 --which wish for Mr. PalmerCharles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
's sake--which wish is exceedingly disinterested on my part inasmuch as I mean the new Member to frank my letters & shall find him much easier to catch than the old one. Have not I tired you with this tirade? Punish me in kind--But you can't--no--you cantcan't--you cannot write so dully if you would--though you may certainly chusechoose the same dull subject--The only consolation to my fears for our next election is that is it less likely than appeared lately to happen soon. We saw yesterday a gentleman from BrightonBrighton, East Sussex, England | Brighton | East Sussex | England | 50.82253000000001 -0.13716299999998682 | A resort town on the south coast of Great Britain, popularized by George IV while Prince Regent. Until 1810, the town’s official name was Brighthelmstone.--#ajc #lmw50.82253000000001 -0.13716299999998682 who is intimate with Sir Matthew TierneyMatthew John Tierney, Sir, baronet | Born: 1776-11-04 in Ballyscandland, County Limerick. Died: 1845-10-28 in Pavilion Parade, Brighton.
Tierney was a physician who became a Physician-in-Ordinary to Kings George IV and William IV of the UK.--#ajc
& who received from him a few days ago an account of the King'sGeorge Augustus Frederick , King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Prince Regent, or: Prince Regent | Born: 1762-08-12 in St James’s Palace, London, England. Died: 1830-06-26 in Windsor Castle, London, England.
The Regency period was named for George when he ruled in his father’s stead from 1811 to 1820. --#ebb
health so exceedingly favorable that no man of character couldpage 4
have given it had he been in so precarious a state as has been imagined--He said His MajestyGeorge Augustus Frederick , King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Prince Regent, or: Prince Regent | Born: 1762-08-12 in St James’s Palace, London, England. Died: 1830-06-26 in Windsor Castle, London, England.
The Regency period was named for George when he ruled in his father’s stead from 1811 to 1820. --#ebb
was as well as ever he had been in his life--Now Sir Matthew TierneyMatthew John Tierney, Sir, baronet | Born: 1776-11-04 in Ballyscandland, County Limerick. Died: 1845-10-28 in Pavilion Parade, Brighton.
Tierney was a physician who became a Physician-in-Ordinary to Kings George IV and William IV of the UK.--#ajc
could not have said this of a man in whom the water was rising & whose legs were cased every morning in sheet lead--as has been the constant report hereabouts for the last fortnight. Did you ever happen to hear how boldly & wisely Sir Matthew TierneyMatthew John Tierney, Sir, baronet | Born: 1776-11-04 in Ballyscandland, County Limerick. Died: 1845-10-28 in Pavilion Parade, Brighton.
Tierney was a physician who became a Physician-in-Ordinary to Kings George IV and William IV of the UK.--#ajc
(Deuce take that man's name--I have three times mis-speltmisspelt it--& yet a lover of SmollettTobias George Smollett | Born: 1721-03-19 in Dalquhurn, Scotland. Died: 1771-09-17 in Antignano, near Livorno, Italy.
Novelist and poet, as well as editor, translator, critic, and medical practitioner. Smollett’s best-known novels were written between 1748 and 1753: The Adventures of Roderick Random (1748), The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle (1751), and The Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom (1753), and his four-volume Complete History of England was published in 1754, revised in 1758 . Together with Thomas Francklin, Smollett helped edit the 35-volume English translation of The Works of Voltaire, from 1761-1765 . He travelled extensively in France and Italy in his last years. (Source ODNB).--#ebb #esh
ought to be able to spell the name sakenamesake of Matthew BrambleMatthew Bramble
character in The Expedition of Humphrey Clinker by Smollett.--#ajc
--how boldly Sir Mat:Matthew John Tierney, Sir, baronet | Born: 1776-11-04 in Ballyscandland, County Limerick. Died: 1845-10-28 in Pavilion Parade, Brighton.
Tierney was a physician who became a Physician-in-Ordinary to Kings George IV and William IV of the UK.--#ajc
saved the King'sGeorge Augustus Frederick , King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Prince Regent, or: Prince Regent | Born: 1762-08-12 in St James’s Palace, London, England. Died: 1830-06-26 in Windsor Castle, London, England.
The Regency period was named for George when he ruled in his father’s stead from 1811 to 1820. --#ebb
life--he was dying--gasping--Sir Henry HalfordHenry Henry St John Halford Vaughn, Sir, baronet, or: Vaughn Henry | Born: 1766-10-02 in Leicester. Died: 1844-03-09 in Curzon Street, Mayfair.
Appointed physician-extraordinary to George III in 1793; he also attended George IV, William IV, and Queen Victoria. He held a variety of positions with the Royal College of Physicians, including President. Born Henry Vaughn, he inherited the Halford family estate of Wistow Hall. Source: ODNB. Also see --#ajc #lmw
walking about the room with his head lost (put that into French if you don't understand it in English) & had been bled--till to bleed seemed to kill--when Sir MatthewMatthew John Tierney, Sir, baronet | Born: 1776-11-04 in Ballyscandland, County Limerick. Died: 1845-10-28 in Pavilion Parade, Brighton.
Tierney was a physician who became a Physician-in-Ordinary to Kings George IV and William IV of the UK.--#ajc
exclaimed--he will probably die in the bleeding--but he must die without--so I'll bleed him--He did so keeping his hand on the pulse & saved him--.

In the midst of this hub-bubhubbub--have you been reading any thinganything new? Did I mention to you a Scotch novel called GlenfergusGlenfergus. In Three Volumes. . 1820. ? Not interesting-- & or probable & occasionally very prosy--but still of great merit, from its perfect truth of character, & the pointed vivacity of the style--two characters a clerical dandy & a most amicable & genuine oldish maiden homely, housewifely, & every thingeverything that is good pleased me particularly--If you read GlenfergusGlenfergus. In Three Volumes. . 1820. tell me if you were not charmed with Aunt RachelAunt Rachel
character in Glenfergus by Mudie.--#ajc
^(I think thatsthat's her name--but really an election puts every thingeverything out of one's head)--She would have done honour to the fine conception of Miss AustenJane Austen | Born: 1775-12-16 in Steventon, Hampshire, England. Died: 1817-07-18 in Winchester, Hampshire, England.
Novelist celebrated for her wit and style, whose works investigated women’s social and economic vulnerabilities in English society. During her lifetime she published Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1815), all anonymously. Northanger Abbey, the first written of her novels (composed in 1798-1799) was published posthumously in 1818 along with her last finished novel, Persuasion. Mitford claims in a letter to Sir William Elford of 3 April 1815 that she has recently discovered Austen "is my countrywoman,", that is, a neighbor. Later in a letter of 2 July 1816 praised Emma in particular among Austen’s novels. She and Elford evidently knew the identity of Austen as the author long before the information was public knowledge, and she claims in the April 3 letter that her mother remembered Jane Austen in her youth as "the prettiest, silliest, most affected, husband-hunting butterfly she ever remembers", but that Jane was by the 1810s extremely quiet, which impressed Mitford: "till Pride and Prejudice showed what a precious gem was hidden in that unbending case, she was no more regarded in society than a poker or a fire-screen, or any other thin upright piece of wood or iron that fills its corner in peace and quietness. The case is very different now; she is still a poker--but a poker of whom every one is afraid. It must be confessed that this silent observation from such an observer is rather formidable. Most writers are good-humoured chatterers--neither very wise nor very witty:--but nine times out of ten (at least in the few that I have known) unaffected and pleasant, and quite removing by their conversation any awe that may have been excited by their works. But a wit, a delineator of character, who does not talk, is terrific indeed!" Source: L’Estrange. --#ebb
.--I have had a great regale in Mr. Fleury de ChaboulonPierre Alexandre Édouard Fleury deChaboulon | Born: 1779. Died: 1835-09-28.
Cabinet secretary of Napoleon after his return from Elba. In 1820 he published Mémoires pour servir à l’histoire de la vie privée, du retour, et du règne de Napoléon. --#ajc
's Memoires de la vie privee &c &c de NapoleonMémoires pour servir à l’histoire de la vie privée, du retour, et du règne de Napoléon en 1815. Fleury de Chaboulon. London: Albemarle Street: John Murray. 1819-1820.
Two volume publication: the first volume was published in 1819 and the second in 1820. Fleury was Napoleon's secretary and cabinet member who served in the Emperor's private life.--#sbb #ebb
--I don't recommend this book to you though very interesting because you might not enjoy so much as I do two goodsizedgood-sized volumes well filled with praises of thepage 5
Ex-EmperorNapoleon Bonaparte
In 1814 when Napoleon was still powerful but on the retreat in Europe, Mary Russell Mitford published a poem titled Napoleon’s Dream in The Poetical Register and Repository of Fugitive Poetry VIII: 215-220 . In the poem, she characterized the military leader and emperor as be-nightmared. Betty Bennett featured an edition of Napoleon’s Dream in her digital collection British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism, 1793-1815 in 2004 . --#ebb
--By the bye this flaming Bon-apartishe book was printed at Murray'sJohn Murray | Born: 1778. Died: 1843.
Byron’s friend and publisher. Founded the Quarterly Review. Premises inLondon on Albermarle-Street. --#ajc #lmw
 --Is not that singular?--I am now reading Dr. Drake'sNathan Drake, or: Dr. Drake, Nathan Drake, M.D. | Born: 1766-01-15 in York, Yorkshire, England. Died: 1836 in Hadleigh, Suffolk, England.
Essayist and physician; his most ambitious work was Shakespeare and his Times. Disambiguation note: Nathan Drake the essayist is the son of the portrait and artist of the same name, who was known for his painting of provincial hunting and sporting scenes and lived from 1728 to 1778. --#ajc #lmw #ebb
great big  books volumes Shakespeare & his TimesShakespeare and His Times: Including the Biography of the Poet; Criticisms on his Genius and Writings; A New Chronology of the Plays; A Disquisition on the Object of His Sonnets; And a History of the Manners, Customs, and Amusements, Superstitions, Poetry, and Elegant Literature of His Age. Nathan Drake. London: T. Cadell and W. Davies. 1817. --Every part of which that is not written by Dr. DrakeNathan Drake, or: Dr. Drake, Nathan Drake, M.D. | Born: 1766-01-15 in York, Yorkshire, England. Died: 1836 in Hadleigh, Suffolk, England.
Essayist and physician; his most ambitious work was Shakespeare and his Times. Disambiguation note: Nathan Drake the essayist is the son of the portrait and artist of the same name, who was known for his painting of provincial hunting and sporting scenes and lived from 1728 to 1778. --#ajc #lmw #ebb
is good--all that he did write is bad--but luckily the far greater part consists of selections from the contemporaries of ShakespeareWilliam Shakespeare | Born: 1564-04 in Stratford upon Avon. Died: 1616-04-23 in Stratford upon Avon.
English author and actor (1564-1616) --#lmw
collected with [Damage: agent: wrinkle.]infinite labour & much taste. How odd it is [Damage: agent: wrinkle.] that a man whose reading is so extensive & so excellent as Dr. DrakeNathan Drake, or: Dr. Drake, Nathan Drake, M.D. | Born: 1766-01-15 in York, Yorkshire, England. Died: 1836 in Hadleigh, Suffolk, England.
Essayist and physician; his most ambitious work was Shakespeare and his Times. Disambiguation note: Nathan Drake the essayist is the son of the portrait and artist of the same name, who was known for his painting of provincial hunting and sporting scenes and lived from 1728 to 1778. --#ajc #lmw #ebb
s & who has been writing all his life, should in his own compositions be so intolerably mawkish! There would be no [Damage: agent: wrinkle.] reading a page if  its one was not carried on by the hope of meeting with a quotation--indeed after a certain degree of acquaintance with the learned author one involuntarily skips every thingeverything not distinguished by inverted commas.

That is a beautiful Chapter of the four lambs--I am so much interested in them--particula[Damage: 3 chars, agent: tear.][rly] the blind one--Who brings that up? the dairy maid or the dam[Gap: reason: torn.] ?--Is it melancholy poor little thing? Does it know its Mother[Gap: reason: torn.] ? Does the Mother pay it particular attention?--Oh how interesting a creature must be a blind lamb! A thing that is so innocent & ought to be gay! Do tell me my dear Sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
all about your poor blind lamb--I do not believe a word about the man who had five--Whose ewe had five I mean--every bodyeverybody here stares in a very proper manner at  the four your four.

Mrs. ElfordElizabeth Walrond Hall, or: Mrs. Elford | Born: 1780 in Manadon, Devon, England. Died: 1839 in Totnes, Devon, England.
Elizabeth was the second wife of Sir William Elford; they married after the death of Mary Davies Elford, on July 5, 1821. She was the daughter and co-heiress of Humphrey Hall of Mandon, Devon, England and his wife, the Hon. Jane St. John, daughter of John St. John, 11th Baron St. John of Bletsoe. She married Maine Swete Waldron, an officer in the Coldstream Guards, in 1803 and they had two children, only one of whom lived to adulthood. Her first husband died around 1817 and she married Sir William Elford four years later. She died at Totnes, Devon in late 1839 and her will was probated on 10 December 1839. Some secondary sources erroneously give the spelling of her first married name as "Waldron;" however, she is not to be confused with the American Elizabeth Waldron (1780 to 21 July 1853).‏ Her birthdate is not given in any standard nineteenth century reference sources, but is likely to be before 1780.--#ebb #ajc #lmw
is a great deal too good to me--She has caught it of you--nothing so contagious as kindness in some families--I wish I were what she supposes me--but really except that reading is one agreeable kind of idleness & writing to you another, I do not know what either my trifling reading or my still more trifling remarks are good for--Nothing but Chitter Chatterchitter-chatter--as anpage 6
honest Cumberland Squire used to call my letters to his niece.

Make my very best & most grateful respects to her notwithstanding (there was no manner of occasion for that jerk)--[Gap: reason: wrinkle.] let me hear very soon how you all are & whether you are coming LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223ward & when.--I believe that at last we are really going away from this houseBertram_house
Mansion built by George Mitford for his family residence, begun in April 1802 and completed in June 1804, after tearing down the previous house on the property, Grazeley Court Farm, a farmhouse about three miles outside of Reading, in the hamlet of Grazeley. George Mitford named his new house after a knight from the reign of William the Conqueror, Sir Robert de Bertram, who had married Sibella Mitford, daughter of Sir John de Mitford (source: Vera Watson). This estate signified George Mitford’s status as a land-owning country gentleman. Prior to this time, the Mitford family lived in Alresford and then in Reading. The family removed from Bertram House in April 1820, after financial reverses forced the family to sell the property.--#ebb #lmw
--though I have heard & said it so often that I shall never thoroughly believe we are going till we are gone. At all events we shall not go far ^& you shall hear all about it--PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
& MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
join in kindest Compliments, & I am ever my dear & kind friend most affectionately your'syours


Mary Russell Mitford.

March, twenty two, ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 1820
Sr Wm ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
Bart
BickhamBickham, Somerset, England | Bickham | Somerset | England | 51.163534 -3.506621999999993 | Hamlet near Plymouth, and residence of Sir William Elford, who lived there until the failure of his finances in 1825 forced him eventually to sell his family’s estate. He sold his property in Bickham in 1831 and moved to The Priory, in Totnes, Devon the house of his daughter (Elizabeth) and son-in-law.--#ebb #lmw51.163534 -3.506621999999993
PlymouthPlymouth, Devonshire, England | Plymouth | Devonshire | England | 50.3754565 -4.14265649999993 | City on the coast of Devonshire. After declines in the seventeenth century, increasingly important from the late eighteenth century into the nineteenth as a seaport, site of trade and emigration to and from the Americas, and a center of shipbuilding. Birthplace of Benjamin Robert Haydon. Sir William Elford was also born nearby at Bickham. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, from its founding in 1782, and he was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth and served from 1796 to 1806.--#ebb #lmw50.3754565 -4.14265649999993
J.B. MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw