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Letter to Sir William ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
, 1820 September 9

Edited by Lisa M. Wilson.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 1 July 2014. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: DSCF8027.JPG, DSCF8028.JPG, DSCF8029.JPG, DSCF8030.JPG, DSCF8031.JPG, DSCF8032.JPG, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff.415

One and one-half sheets of folio paper, six surfaces photographed. The letter was folded in thirds twice, and bears an address leaf with a black, circular mileage stamp, mostly illegible: [Gap: 1 chars, reason: illegible.][R]EADING
[Gap: reason: illegible.]Half sheet (pages five and six) torn on right edge where wax seal was removed.A red wax seal with the imprint Mary.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
To Sir W. ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
16Three Mile CrossSeptember 9th 1820.

You will think your poor little FriendMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
very naughty indeed, my dear Sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
if she do not sometimes write you two letters, so having made no vow by StyxRiver Styx | River in Greek mythology that separates the realms of the living from the dead, and encircling Hades (the realm of the dead or underworld). For more, see the reference in Encyclopedia Mythica: --#ebb #lmw this time, she will scribble.[1] In ancient Greek history and mythology, gods or mortals who make oaths by the River StyxRiver Styx | River in Greek mythology that separates the realms of the living from the dead, and encircling Hades (the realm of the dead or underworld). For more, see the reference in Encyclopedia Mythica: --#ebb #lmw are understood to be strongly bound not to break them. The penalty for breaking an oath was to drink the poisonous water of this mythical river, which would stupefy the oath-breaker for an entire year.—#ebb #lmw Having nothing to say ^my dear Sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
is such an old story between us that there  areis no need of apologies on that score. I really think we go on quite as well without a subject as with one--the cobweb spins out to a good size--rather flimsy to be sure, & not very durable--but there it is looking very happy & comfortable these bright autumn mornings-- & the poor little round spider snugs herself up in her hole and seems proud of her handywork & as soon as one is finished away begins another.--So she shall spin on. Moreover, it behooves me to pay my court very spiderously, or I shall have my nose quite put ^ ofout of joint by that formidable rival Lady MadelinaMadelina Madalina Sinclair Palmer, the Lady, or: Lady M.P., Lady Mad., Lady Madelina Palmer | Born: 1772-06-19 in Gordon Castle, Bellie, Moray, Scotland. Died: 1847 in Chapel Street, Grosvenor Place, London, England.
Lady Madelina Gordon was born on June 10, 1772, the daughter of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon, and Jane Maxwell, at Gordon Castle, Bellie, Moray, Scotland. Her first husband was Robert Sinclair, 7th Baronet Sinclair; they married in 1789 and had one child, John Gordon Sinclair. Her second husband was the Reading Whig politician Charles Fyshe Palmer. They married in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire. They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country. Her sister Charlotte Gordon became Duchess of Richmond through her marriage to Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond, 4th Duke of Lennox and 4th Duke of Aubigny. Her sister Susan Gordon became Duchess of Manchester through her marriage to William Montagu, Duke of Manchester. Her sister Louise Gordon became Marchioness Cornwallis through marriage to Charles Cornwallis, Marquess of Cornwallis. Her sister Georgiana Gordon became Duchess of Bedford through marriage to John Russell, Duke of Bedford. Her brothers were George Duncan Gordon, who became 5th Duke of Gordon, and Lord Alexander Gordon. Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. Lady Madelina’s name is variously spelled Madelina and Madalina, although Madelina appears to be the more common and standard spellling of the name, as an anglicization of the French Madeline. For more on the Palmers, see note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning .--#kab #ebb #ad #lmw
. I did wait on her as I told you I should, & think with you that she is a most delightful woman. I did not expect to find her still so very handsome--but the best parts of beauty, grace intelligence & and goodhumourgood humour are those which last the longest, & and that pretty Scotch voice is enchanting. We talked a great deal of you--& of Devonshire--which she admires with her whole heart--& she says things of you--It is very well that Mr. PalmerCharles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
was out of hearing--there is no love lost beween you [I assure] you. In short I was quite charmed with every thing about her but her QueenCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
madness which burst forth suddenly on the appearance of the TimesThe Times.
Newspaper issued daily, begun in London in 1785 as The Daily Universal Register, and titled The Times from 1 January 1788.--#ebb
& sent me off in a hurry. Had she this frenzy-fever in DevonshireDevonshire, England | Devon | 50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 | County in the south west of England bordering the English Channel and the Bristol Channel. Now called Devon.--#ebb #lmw50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 or has she caught it from her husbandCharles Fyshe Palmer, or: Long Fyshe | Born: 1769 in Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1843-01-24 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Charles Fyshe Palmer was baptised on April 24, 1769, the son of Charles Fyshe Palmer and Lucy Jones. He married Lady Madelina Gordon Sinclair in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire . They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country, and Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. A Whig politician, Palmer began running for Parliament elections as the member for Reading after 1816, and appears to have served off and on in that role until 1841. He led the Berkshire meetings to protest British government’s handling of the Peterloo Massacre in 1819. On March 16, 1820, Palmer ran for a seat in Parliament against two other candidates. The votes ran: John Berkeley Monck (418 votes), Charles Fyshe Palmer(399 votes), and John Weyland(395 votes.) Mitford’s letters around this time indicate she much preferred his opponent J. B. Monck, and she had earlier satirized Palmer in 1818 as "vastly like a mop-stick, or, rather, a tall hop-pole, or an extremely long fishing-rod, or anything that is all length and no substance." Mitford also mentions Palmer in connection with a legal issue surrounding the Billiard Club, in her letter to Talfourd of 31 August 1822 . Mitford also mentions the ways that Palmer’s political opponents sometimes undermined his Whig reformist positions by referencing the noble privileges (and money) he accrued by marrying the Lady Madelina Gordon in 1805. See note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning . --#ajc #lmw
? He & his brother members & his precious constituentsPalmerite
Supporter of Charles Fyshe Palmer in the Reading elections of March 16, 1820.--#ajc
are alike insane upon this subject. Indeed to do ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 justice it never is behindhand in anypage 2
folly stirring. They had a meeting to address the QueenCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
--& voted said address--& sent up their worthy members to present it--& up they went in all their paraphernalia--& the gracious QueenCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
never spoke to them! Is not this famous? Never said a word, shoved the answer unread into their hands, held her tongue & marched off. "Served them just right--did not she MaryMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
?" SaidsaidMrs. MonckMary Monck Stephens, or: Mrs. Monck
Wife of John Berkeley Monck, the Member of Parliament for Reading. Francis Needham claims that it is she and her husband who are referred to in "Violeting" , when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March, 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library. --#lmw #scw
to me when she told me the story--"a couple of simpletons. I only wish the whole meeting had been there to have partaken of the compliment." Mrs. MonckMary Monck Stephens, or: Mrs. Monck
Wife of John Berkeley Monck, the Member of Parliament for Reading. Francis Needham claims that it is she and her husband who are referred to in "Violeting" , when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March, 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library. --#lmw #scw
you see is sane. Did I ever talk to you of the Moncksthe Moncks, family of John Berkeley Monck ? HeJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
is a very extraordinary man--a great Grecian--& more like an old philosopher than anything you ever saw--I defy anything or anybody to put him out of humour--he has not of course though a clever man,  any thingmuch of Charles FoxCharles James Fox, The Honourable , Member of Parliament, Leader of the House of Commons, secretary of State for Foreign Affairs | Born: 1749-01-24 in Westminster, London, England. Died: 1806-09-13 in Chiswick, England.
Whig politician and leader of the House of Commons. Fox was an outspoken opponent of King George III and William Pitt the Younger, supporter of the American and French Revolutions as well as the abolitionist cause. His politics became widely known as "Foxite radicalism" and synonymous with populist causes. The young Mary Russell Mitford was an avowed Fox admirer, as were many Whig families in the decades following his death in 1806. --#ebb #lmw
's powers or eloquence, but he is more like him in point of character than any man that ever lived--full of kindheartedness & of a tolerant humanity--more generally beloved by man woman & child than any person I ever heard of--Dividing his whole time between literature & usefulness & family affection. His wifeMary Monck Stephens, or: Mrs. Monck
Wife of John Berkeley Monck, the Member of Parliament for Reading. Francis Needham claims that it is she and her husband who are referred to in "Violeting" , when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March, 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library. --#lmw #scw
is a pretty lively chatty woman kind & good humored--entirely without her husband'shusband's largeness & liberality of mind--not even understanding the breadth & depth of his character--but in whom good habits & kindly prejudices produce nearly the same effect. She loves his ^old friends because they are old friends, & is good to the poor because she has been used to  it.be charitable.--She has returned from a three years & a half tour through FranceFrance | 46.227638 2.213749000000007 | Country in western Europe. Paris is the capital and largest city.--#bas46.227638 2.213749000000007ItalyItaly | 41.87194 12.567379999999957 | Country in south-central Europe; shaped as a peninsula that reaches deep into the Mediterranean Sea.--#bas41.87194 12.567379999999957SwitzerlandSwitzerland | 46.95, 7.45 | A country located in western-Central Europe.--#bas46.95, 7.45 & GermanyGermany | 51.165691 10.451526000000058 | A country in central-western Europe. Berlin is the capital and largest city.--#bas51.165691 10.451526000000058 without having brought back a single new feeling or left behind one old one. She is so entirely unchanged in mind & person as to produce an effect more extraordinary & surprising than could have  been the resulted from the greatest alteration. She took up her ColeyColey Park, Berkshire, England | Coley | Coley Park | Berkshire | England | 51.4432268 -0.9902848000000404 | An estate just south west of Reading. The Moncks owned Coley Park from 1810 and Mitford occasionally posted franked letters from there when J. B Monck was a Member of Parliament. Also referred to as "Coley," although this name also refers to a nearby district of Reading proper. | --#lmw51.4432268 -0.9902848000000404 habits, as if she had only laid them aside page 3
the night before with her clothes, & the presence of a sweet little girl of three years old born in FranceFrance | 46.227638 2.213749000000007 | Country in western Europe. Paris is the capital and largest city.--#bas46.227638 2.213749000000007 & and not speaking a word of English seems necessary to convince one that the Mother has ever set her foot on the Continent. This identity of character has a great charm with me--I never liked Mrs. MonckMary Monck Stephens, or: Mrs. Monck
Wife of John Berkeley Monck, the Member of Parliament for Reading. Francis Needham claims that it is she and her husband who are referred to in "Violeting" , when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March, 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library. --#lmw #scw
half so well in my life as since she returned so perfectly the same as she went. Besides we agree like two drops of water. She hates her husbandshusband's parliamenting. So do I. She sickens at the name of Queen CarolineCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
. So do I. She thinks Mortimer CommonMortimer Common, Berkshire, England | Mortimer Common | Berkshire | England | 51.3770005 -1.0629936999999927 | Village east of Swallowfield in Berkshire.--#lmw51.3770005 -1.0629936999999927 the prettiest place in the world. So do I. She detests ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 and its doings. So do I.--ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 is at present QueenCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
mad. It reads & talks & dreams & lies of nothing else--& engrafts a clumsy and awkward licentiousness on its original vulgarity & dullness. After all the crying evil of this frightful enquiry is its tendency to confound right & wrong. Those who dislike the KingGeorge Augustus Frederick , King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Prince Regent, or: Prince Regent | Born: 1762-08-12 in St James’s Palace, London, England. Died: 1830-06-26 in Windsor Castle, London, England.
The Regency period was named for George when he ruled in his father’s stead from 1811 to 1820. --#ebb
's immorality think themselves bound by the duty of party to palliate the much grosser and more horrible conduct of the QueenCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
, & we hear of "little indiscretions" & "too great condescensions" & such paltering with vice from the very lips of the stern mentors who thunder at the crimes of Kings & the wickedness of Ministers. This must be wrong--there can only be one Virtue & one Wickedness. Besides the QueenCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
's  conductdefence throws a stain & a slur upon womanhood--She seeks to cover her enormous crime with a cloak of innocence & purity & profanes the sacred & holy name of matronly virtue by asserting her claim to it. Chastity is become a byewordbyword & a jest--She is to womanly purity, what a false prophet is to religion. She can not alter the eternal truth--but she can give mockers & scoffers a pretence to doubt it'sits existence. Many years must pass away before the effect of this ceases & modesty shall become page 4
again a holy thing. I am astonished when I hear a woman vindicate the QueenCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
. Do tell me what you think on this subject? [2] These wavy lines appear to represent a change in paragraph and subject (and in this case also a change from one day's writing to a later one). It seems possible that Mitford Mary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
uses this metamark to indicate such a change without wasting the space incurred by a paragraph break.—#lmw

Sept. 13.--Since writing the above I have spent a day at ColeyColey Park, Berkshire, England | Coley | Coley Park | Berkshire | England | 51.4432268 -0.9902848000000404 | An estate just south west of Reading. The Moncks owned Coley Park from 1810 and Mitford occasionally posted franked letters from there when J. B Monck was a Member of Parliament. Also referred to as "Coley," although this name also refers to a nearby district of Reading proper. | --#lmw51.4432268 -0.9902848000000404 & extracted from Mr. MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
rather more of the Royal Visit than his wife could do, partly by cross-examination--& partly from an effect of character. "You are bad enough, MaryMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
," said quoth he "but not quite so bitter as my wife." She really did speak to them--She said "You do me honour--it is an excellent address"--(I dare say she thought so for of all the fulsome nonsense that has been penned on her none this surpassed!)--her presence was announced by a prodigious giggling chattering & romping outside the door--like a parcel of boys let loose from school--which suddenly ceased & she entered as gravely as Mrs. ListonSarah Tyrer Liston, or: Sarah Liston, Mrs. John Liston, Miss Tyrer, Sarah Tyrer | Born: 1781. Died: 1854.
English comic actress known for her singing voice and roles in burlesque operas, and celebrated for her performance as Miss Tyrer of Queen Dollalolla in Kane O’Hara’s burlesque adaptation of Henry Fielding’s Tom Thumb , in Haymarket Theatre, July 1805. She began her theatrical career at Drury Lane and Haymarket theaters in May and June of 1801, was engaged by Covent Garden Theatre in September 1805, and married the comic actor John Liston on 22 March 1807. Both John and Sarah Liston publicly retired from the theatre with valedictory performances at Covent Garden on 31 May 1822. [Sources: entries on John Liston in ODNB, DNB 1885-1900. See in particular ] --#lmw #ebb
in Queen DollalollaQueen Dollalolla
Comic role in Henry Fielding’s play Tom Thumb, adapted in Mitford’s day by Kane O’Hara as a comic opera, with Sarah Tyrer famously playing this role.--#ebb
Airs, duets, &c. in the comic opera of Tom Thumb, in two acts, Tom Thumb: a burlesque tragedy. Kane O’Hara, Henry Fielding, Henry Fielding.
Comic opera adapation of Henry Fielding’s Tom Thumb . Roach’s edition of 1811 features illustrations of Sarah Tyrer in the role of Queen Dollalolla in the 1805 production. [Source: WorldCAT]--#ebb
.[3] Mitford is conflating a celebrated role in a burletta with the production itself: Sarah Tyrer Liston, as Sarah TyrerSarah Tyrer Liston, or: Sarah Liston, Mrs. John Liston, Miss Tyrer, Sarah Tyrer | Born: 1781. Died: 1854.
English comic actress known for her singing voice and roles in burlesque operas, and celebrated for her performance as Miss Tyrer of Queen Dollalolla in Kane O’Hara’s burlesque adaptation of Henry Fielding’s Tom Thumb , in Haymarket Theatre, July 1805. She began her theatrical career at Drury Lane and Haymarket theaters in May and June of 1801, was engaged by Covent Garden Theatre in September 1805, and married the comic actor John Liston on 22 March 1807. Both John and Sarah Liston publicly retired from the theatre with valedictory performances at Covent Garden on 31 May 1822. [Sources: entries on John Liston in ODNB, DNB 1885-1900. See in particular ] --#lmw #ebb
before her marriage in 1807, was widely celebrated for her performance of Queen DollalollaQueen Dollalolla
Comic role in Henry Fielding’s play Tom Thumb, adapted in Mitford’s day by Kane O’Hara as a comic opera, with Sarah Tyrer famously playing this role.--#ebb
in a comic opera adaptation of Tom ThumbTom Thumb. Scriblerus Secundus. London: Printed and sold by J. Roberts in Warwick-Lane. 1730.
First performed outside the Haymarket Theatre in September 1730.--#ebb
Airs, duets, &c. in the comic opera of Tom Thumb, in two acts, Tom Thumb: a burlesque tragedy. Kane O’Hara, Henry Fielding, Henry Fielding.
Comic opera adapation of Henry Fielding’s Tom Thumb . Roach’s edition of 1811 features illustrations of Sarah Tyrer in the role of Queen Dollalolla in the 1805 production. [Source: WorldCAT]--#ebb
. She continued her acting career as Mrs. ListonSarah Tyrer Liston, or: Sarah Liston, Mrs. John Liston, Miss Tyrer, Sarah Tyrer | Born: 1781. Died: 1854.
English comic actress known for her singing voice and roles in burlesque operas, and celebrated for her performance as Miss Tyrer of Queen Dollalolla in Kane O’Hara’s burlesque adaptation of Henry Fielding’s Tom Thumb , in Haymarket Theatre, July 1805. She began her theatrical career at Drury Lane and Haymarket theaters in May and June of 1801, was engaged by Covent Garden Theatre in September 1805, and married the comic actor John Liston on 22 March 1807. Both John and Sarah Liston publicly retired from the theatre with valedictory performances at Covent Garden on 31 May 1822. [Sources: entries on John Liston in ODNB, DNB 1885-1900. See in particular ] --#lmw #ebb
until 1822.—#ebb #lmw
Her dress we had a great deal of fun about from the delicious ignorance of the describer. It was in the midst of the Court mourning & he put himself to charges for a black suit, the coat he had to go to the Pope's CourtCourt of Pope Pius VII
Pope Pius VII and his Cardinals, from 1800 to 1823. The court was driven to exile in Savona between 1809 and 1813, but restored to Rome after a treaty with Napoleon.--#ebb
[4] If MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
paid a visit to the Pope's Court, presumably this was the court of Pope Pius VIIBarnaba Niccolò Maria Luigi Chiaramonti, Pope | Born: 1742-08-14 in Cesena, Papal States. Died: 1823-08-20 in Rome, Papal States.
Pius the VII reigned the Pope, or patriarch of the Catholic Church, from 1800 to 1823. He and his Cardinals were exiled by Napoleon to Savona from 1809 to 1813, and restored to Rome by signing a treaty in 1813. Mitford mentions an unspecified past visit of J. B. Monck to the Pope’s Court in her letter to Sir William Elford of 9 September 1820 .--#ebb
of 1800-1823Court of Pope Pius VII
Pope Pius VII and his Cardinals, from 1800 to 1823. The court was driven to exile in Savona between 1809 and 1813, but restored to Rome after a treaty with Napoleon.--#ebb
. NapoleonNapoleon Bonaparte
In 1814 when Napoleon was still powerful but on the retreat in Europe, Mary Russell Mitford published a poem titled Napoleon’s Dream in The Poetical Register and Repository of Fugitive Poetry VIII: 215-220 . In the poem, she characterized the military leader and emperor as be-nightmared. Betty Bennett featured an edition of Napoleon’s Dream in her digital collection British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism, 1793-1815 in 2004 . --#ebb
forced the PopeBarnaba Niccolò Maria Luigi Chiaramonti, Pope | Born: 1742-08-14 in Cesena, Papal States. Died: 1823-08-20 in Rome, Papal States.
Pius the VII reigned the Pope, or patriarch of the Catholic Church, from 1800 to 1823. He and his Cardinals were exiled by Napoleon to Savona from 1809 to 1813, and restored to Rome by signing a treaty in 1813. Mitford mentions an unspecified past visit of J. B. Monck to the Pope’s Court in her letter to Sir William Elford of 9 September 1820 .--#ebb
and his CardinalsCourt of Pope Pius VII
Pope Pius VII and his Cardinals, from 1800 to 1823. The court was driven to exile in Savona between 1809 and 1813, but restored to Rome after a treaty with Napoleon.--#ebb
into exile to the province of SavonaSavona, Italy | Savona | Liguria | Papal States | Italy | 44.3425496 8.42938909999998 | Seaport in northern Italy. Pope Pius VII and his Cardinals were driven to exile here by Napoleon, between 1809 and 1813.--#ebb #lmw44.3425496 8.42938909999998between 1809 and 1813, but was restored to RomeRome, Italy | Rome | Papal States | Italy | 41.9027835 12.496365500000024 | City on the central Italian Peninsula on the River Tiber. One of the oldest cities in the world, and once capital of the ancient Roman Empire. Throughout much of Mitford’s lifetime, Rome was governed by the Vatican as part of the Papal States, although it was part of the short-lived Roman Republic between 1798 and 1800, annexed to the French Empire under Napoleon between 1808 and 1814, and experienced another short-lived attempt at Italian unification in 1849. Center of art and culture since ancient times, Rome was a frequent stop for young men from Western Europe on the Grand Tour. Now the capital of Italy and of the Lazio region.--#lmw41.9027835 12.496365500000024 by signing a treaty. It seems likely that MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
would have visited the Pope's CourtCourt of Pope Pius VII
Pope Pius VII and his Cardinals, from 1800 to 1823. The court was driven to exile in Savona between 1809 and 1813, but restored to Rome after a treaty with Napoleon.--#ebb
during his time in Europe Europe | 54.883056 15.430833 --54.883056 15.430833 in the previous decade.—#ebb
being unluckily of a pure colour--but the Lady herselfCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
was it appears in colours--"fawn Colour MaryMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
--the colour of that Cow!"--How was it made:[Gap: 1 word, reason: deletion.]  ."So"--buttoning up his Coat--Of a Man's Coat--pray was the best of her apparel--"Don't be foolish--a woman's coat"--a grey coat--the thing you all wear in winter"--a Pelisse?--"Yes--a fawn coloured pelisse--garnished with gold!"--

Have you read the AbbotThe Abbot. Walter Scott. London Edinburgh: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown Archibald Constable and Company, and John Ballantyne. 1820.
Historical novel: One of Scott’s series of Tales from Benedictine Sources, The Abbot introduces the character Roland Graeme, and renders the experiences of Mary, Queen of Scots during her imprisonment and escape from Loch Leven Castle in 1567 .--#ebb
? I have just finished it--disappointed--because as every alternate book of his is commonly excellent & the last was bad I had made up my mind that this should be good--& good it would be from any bodyanybody else, but he has accustomed us to such writing that mere mediocrity will not satisfy us. After all it is remarkably pleasant reading--quite as free from the peculiar faults as the striking beauties of the AuthorWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
--no ghost--no prophecies--only one old woman & not much of her--& no torture scene--a very agreeable book, but page 5
not one which as a first work would have made a reputation like WaverleyWaverley; or ’Tis Sixty Years Since. Walter Scott. Archibald Constable. 1814. or Old MortalityOld Mortality. Walter Scott. .--The great fault of the story is that the subject is in fact a bad one. Mary Queen of ScotsMary Stuart | Born: 1542-12 in Linlithgow Scotland . Died: 1587-02-08 in Stirling .
Mary, Queen of Scots was executed by the order of Queen Elizabeth I, against whom she was supposed to have conspired. She was succeeded by her son, James I, the first Stuart king of England and Scotland.--#rnes
is a person of whom with all her sins we have dreamt all our life long--. There is not a creature of any imagination who has not made her romance in his own mind long before now--the Bodleian MaryMary Stuart | Born: 1542-12 in Linlithgow Scotland . Died: 1587-02-08 in Stirling .
Mary, Queen of Scots was executed by the order of Queen Elizabeth I, against whom she was supposed to have conspired. She was succeeded by her son, James I, the first Stuart king of England and Scotland.--#rnes
all beauty & all grace, the love of all men--the envy of all women--She who makes possible all that has been feigned of nymph or Goddess--there is no writing up to what one fancies of Her! Nobody has ever accomplished this feat--no one ever will--SchillerJohann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller
German author (1759-1805) Wrote Die Räuber or The Robbers (play, 1781), Fiesco (play, 1783), and Wilhelm Tell or William Tell play, 1804). Early in her playwriting career, Mitford attempted an adaptation of his Fiesco which was never performed. --#lmw
--AlfieriVittorio Alfieri, Count | Born: 1749-01-16 in Asti, Piedmont region. Died: 1803-10-08 in Florence.
Credited with reviving Italian tragedy in the eighteenth century, Alfieri’s plays included Filippo, Polinice, Antigone, Virginia,and the highly acclaimed Saul. He also authored an ode on American Independence and a satirical poem, The Antigallican, on the French Revolution. --#ebb
--the Ettrick ShepherdJames Hogg, or: the Ettrick Shepherd | Born: 1770 in near Ettrick, Scotland. Died: 1835-11-21.
Scottish ballad collector, poet, and novelist who wrote in Scottish and English and was encouraged by his life-long friend Walter Scott to take up a writing career. Hogg authored a long poem, The Queen’s Wake on Mary Queen of Scots in 1813 , and The Private Memoirs and Confessions of a Justified Sinner, anonymously published in 1824 .--#ebb
--three Master Spirits have all failed when they wrote of Queen MaryMary Stuart | Born: 1542-12 in Linlithgow Scotland . Died: 1587-02-08 in Stirling .
Mary, Queen of Scots was executed by the order of Queen Elizabeth I, against whom she was supposed to have conspired. She was succeeded by her son, James I, the first Stuart king of England and Scotland.--#rnes
[5] Mitford refers to Friedrich Schiller's play, Mary Stuart which debuted in Weimar, Germany in June 1800, Vittorio Alfieri's tragedy Maria Stuarda performed in 1778, and James Hogg's poem, The Queen's Wake: A Legendary Poem, a long verse narrative published in 1813The Queen’s Wake: a Legendary Poem, The Queen’s Wake. James Hogg. Edinburgh: A. Balfour, for G. Goldie. 1813.
A long poem, first published in 1813, purporting to be a collection of poems and ballads presented by Scottish bards to Mary, Queen of Scots at Holyrood. The poem became an unexpected commercial and literary success, and Hogg published a series of successively revised editions, the most influential of which was the fifth edition, which appeared in 1819. Mitford mentions the poem in a letter to Sir William Elford of September 20, 1820 .--#alg #ebb #lmw
.—#ebb
--but I think the failure of Walter ScottWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
the most egregious of any--he takes her down from her pedestal--makes her scold--disenchants the lady Dulcinea del TobosoDulcinea del Toboso
Name of idealized female character in Don Quixote (who is mentioned in the text but never appears). Proverbial for an ideal woman.--#lmw
--wakens one from one's pleasant dream--brings a light befo[Gap: 2 chars, reason: torn.][re][6] At the end of this line and the next, a couple of characters have been obliterated by the removal of the seal.—#ebb one's magic lantern & puts out the pretty pictures--Now th[Gap: 2 chars, reason: torn.][at] is not a friend's office--nor a poet's--as the critics I suppose will tell him. Meanwhile the book is pleasant reading in spite of this fault & another--which is that all the plot which is not Queen MaryMary Stuart | Born: 1542-12 in Linlithgow Scotland . Died: 1587-02-08 in Stirling .
Mary, Queen of Scots was executed by the order of Queen Elizabeth I, against whom she was supposed to have conspired. She was succeeded by her son, James I, the first Stuart king of England and Scotland.--#rnes
is occupied by a twin brother & sister confusion--like the SebastianSebastian
Character in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.--#lmw
& ViolaViola
Character in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.--#lmw
of Twelfth NightTwelfth Night. William Shakespeare. 1601.
A late dark romantic comedy in Shakespeare’s oeuvre, with first recorded production in February 1602.--#ebb
. Now it is not wise in Sir Walter ScottWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
to remind his readers of malice prepense of ShakespeareWilliam Shakespeare | Born: 1564-04 in Stratford upon Avon. Died: 1616-04-23 in Stratford upon Avon.
English author and actor (1564-1616) --#lmw
's last workTwelfth Night. William Shakespeare. 1601.
A late dark romantic comedy in Shakespeare’s oeuvre, with first recorded production in February 1602.--#ebb
& worthy to be his last work--moreover CatherineCatherine
Character in Walter Scott’s novel The Abbot. --#lmw
is as little like the delicious ViolaViola
Character in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.--#lmw
as HenryHenry
Character in Walter Scott’s novel The Abbot. --#lmw
is like the frank & generous SebastianSebastian
Character in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.--#lmw
. Notwithstanding which the book is a pleasant book, as you will think & say.

Have you seen Mrs. Graham's Three Months residence in the Mountains east of RomeThree months passed in the mountains east of Rome : during the year 1819. Maria Graham. London Edinburgh: Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown A. Constable and Company. 1820.
Illustrated with engravings. Source: Google Books and WorldCAT.--#ebb #lmw
? (bad overgrown title!) Very entertaining--particularly the Surgeon's escape from the Banditti--the manner in which his poor Townsmen stripped themselves of all for his ransom & then went to Church in procession to thank God for his deliverance quite makes page 6
one in love with the Italians. Mrs. GrahamMaria Graham Callcott , Maria, Lady Callcott | Born: 1785-07-19 in Cockermouth, Cumberland. Died: 1842-11-21 in Kensington Gravel Pits, London.
Mitford writes of this adventurous woman as Mrs. Graham and references her travel publications, Journal of a Residence in India of 1812 and her journal, Three months passed in the mountains east of Rome : during the year 1819 . She was known for her multiple publications on her travels in India, Chile, and Brazil, and as Maria Graham, she published the first English biography of the artist Nicholas Poussin: Memoirs of the Life of Nicholas Poussin (1820).. A polymathic enthusiast, she traveled widely in her life, and met her first husband, Lieutenant Thomas Graham, on board the HMS Cornelia bound to Bombay on a trip with her father and siblings in 1809 . During an extended trip to South America, Thomas Graham died on a voyage from Brazil to Valparaíso, Chile on 9 April 1822 , after which Maria resided in Chile and Brazil, where she served as governess to the Brazilian emperor’s daughter, Donna Maria. Her description of an earthquake in Quintero, Brazil influenced Charles Lyell’s explanations in Principles of Geology (1830) of land mass formation by what we would now call tectonic activity. After her return to England in 1826, she met and married the landscape artist Augustus Wall Callcott (1779-1844), who was knighted in 1837, making her Lady Callcott for the last years of her life. Source: ODNB. .--#ebb
by the way is the lady respecting whom the QuarterlyQuarterly Review. 1809-1967.
Tory periodical founded by George Canning in 1809, published by John Murray. William Gifford edited the Quarterly Review from its founding in 1809 until 1824, was succeeded briefly by John Taylor Coleridge in 1825, until John Gibson Lockhart took over as editor from 1826 through 1853. Archived at Romantic Circles, Quarterly Review Archive --#lmw
some time ago made so curious a mistake. She went with her husband to IndiaIndia | Indian subcontinent | India | 20.593684 78.96288000000004 | In Mitford’s time, the East India Company and its private armies controlled India and its economy, effectively from 1757 to 1858, after which Queen Victoria and her government directly governed India as the Raj. Became the Republic of India, a federal parliamentary republic, in 1950.--#ebb20.593684 78.96288000000004 & published a Journal of her residence thereJournal of a Residence in India: illustrated by engravings. Maria Graham. Edinburgh: A. Constable. 1812.
Another edition was published in 1813 in Edinburgh by A. Constable and Company, and in London by Longman, Rees, Orme, and Browne. Source: WorldCAT and Google Books. --#ebb
--mentioning the aforementioned husband in almost every page--but the Critic wanted a book to cut up & chose Maria Graham's prefacing his review by saying "This work is we suppose the product of some young lady who went out on a matrimonial speculation & having failed in that design is now come back to try the book market"--& so forth.[7] Mitford is almost certainly recalling the review of Graham's work likely by John Barrow published in The Quarterly Review as article 8 of the December 1812 issue. The review begins, "'The Journal of a Residence in IndiaJournal of a Residence in India: illustrated by engravings. Maria Graham. Edinburgh: A. Constable. 1812.
Another edition was published in 1813 in Edinburgh by A. Constable and Company, and in London by Longman, Rees, Orme, and Browne. Source: WorldCAT and Google Books. --#ebb
,' by a young lady who, probably, went thither, like most young ladies, to procure a husband instead of information, is a literary curiosity which we are not disposed to overlook." On the conjectured authorship of the review, see The Quarterly Review Archive.—#ebb
--My dear Sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
you must write to me soon--You will confess that I have sent you nonsense enough this bout.--Has Miss ElizabethElizabeth Elford | Born: 1782-03-11 in Plympton Erle, Plymouth, Devon. Died: 1837.
Second daughter of Sir William Elford by his first wife, Mary Davies Elford. On 23 July 1821 Elizabeth married George Pownoll Adams (1779-1856) of Totnes, Devon, who later became General Sir George Pownoll Adams, KCH. They had four sons, all of whom were born at Ashprington, Devon, likely at Bowden House, the estate of George’s older brother William Dacres Adams. They later resided at Wiveliscombe, Somerset and at East Budleigh, Devon, with their children and with Elizabeth’s elder sister Grace. Elizabeth is mentioned in her husband’s April 1856 will and presumably died after 1856; she has not been located in the 1861 census. Source: ODNB and Ancestry.com--#ebb #lmw
finished the roses & oak boughs? (You see I have not had a chat with Lady MadelinaMadelina Madalina Sinclair Palmer, the Lady, or: Lady M.P., Lady Mad., Lady Madelina Palmer | Born: 1772-06-19 in Gordon Castle, Bellie, Moray, Scotland. Died: 1847 in Chapel Street, Grosvenor Place, London, England.
Lady Madelina Gordon was born on June 10, 1772, the daughter of Alexander Gordon, 4th Duke of Gordon, and Jane Maxwell, at Gordon Castle, Bellie, Moray, Scotland. Her first husband was Robert Sinclair, 7th Baronet Sinclair; they married in 1789 and had one child, John Gordon Sinclair. Her second husband was the Reading Whig politician Charles Fyshe Palmer. They married in 1805 at Kimbolton Castle in Kimbolton, Herefordshire. They lived at Luckley House, Wokingham, Berkshire and at East Court, Finchampstead, Berkshire. Through her siblings, Lady Madelina was connected to several of the most influential aristocratic families in the country. Her sister Charlotte Gordon became Duchess of Richmond through her marriage to Charles Lennox, 4th Duke of Richmond, 4th Duke of Lennox and 4th Duke of Aubigny. Her sister Susan Gordon became Duchess of Manchester through her marriage to William Montagu, Duke of Manchester. Her sister Louise Gordon became Marchioness Cornwallis through marriage to Charles Cornwallis, Marquess of Cornwallis. Her sister Georgiana Gordon became Duchess of Bedford through marriage to John Russell, Duke of Bedford. Her brothers were George Duncan Gordon, who became 5th Duke of Gordon, and Lord Alexander Gordon. Charles Fyshe Palmer’s marriage to Lady Madelina thus gained him access to aristocratic houses, including the Holland House. Lady Madelina’s name is variously spelled Madelina and Madalina, although Madelina appears to be the more common and standard spellling of the name, as an anglicization of the French Madeline. For more on the Palmers, see note 2 in The Browning’s Correspondence rendering of Mitford’s letter of 12 March 1842 to Elizabeth Barrett Browning .--#kab #ebb #ad #lmw
for nothing!) Has Miss ElfordGrace Chard Elford, or: Miss Elford | Born: in Plympton, Devon, England. Died: 1856-02-24 in St. Thomas, Devon, England.
Elder daughter of Sir William Elford and Mary Davies Elford; she was baptised at Plympton, Devon on November 11, 1781. Her middle name, "Chard," is derived from her maternal lineage; Grace’s maternal grandmother was born Mary Chard. Grace Elford remained unmarried and later came to reside with her sister Elizabeth Elford Adams and her family, according to census records. She died on February 22, 1857 at St. Thomas, Devon.--#lmw
recovered her parrot?--& above all Does Miss Welsford's[8] We have not identified Miss Welsford, but speculate that she might be a friend of Sir William's daughters.—#lmw #ebb health continue to improve?--Kindest regards from all here.--

Ever my dear friend
Most sincerely & affectionately your's M.R. Mitford
ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753September fifteen 1820
Sr Wm Elford BartWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw

Bickham
J. B. MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
--PlymouthPlymouth, Devonshire, England | Plymouth | Devonshire | England | 50.3754565 -4.14265649999993 | City on the coast of Devonshire. After declines in the seventeenth century, increasingly important from the late eighteenth century into the nineteenth as a seaport, site of trade and emigration to and from the Americas, and a center of shipbuilding. Birthplace of Benjamin Robert Haydon. Sir William Elford was also born nearby at Bickham. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, from its founding in 1782, and he was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth and served from 1796 to 1806.--#ebb #lmw50.3754565 -4.14265649999993