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Letter to Sir William ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
, November 27, 1820

Edited by Samantha Webb.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: February 1, 2017. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: DSCF8062.jpg, DSCF8063.jpg, DSCF8064.jpg, DSCF8065.jpg, DSCF8066.jpg, DSCF8067.jpg, DSCF8068.jpg, DSCF8069.jpg, DSCF8070.jpg, DSCF8071.jpg, DSCF8072.jpg, DSCF8073.jpg, DSCF8074.jpg, DSCF8075.jpg, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
.-->

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 424

Text describing the document. Include information on the material, usually thus: paper7 page surfaces photographed, folded in half lengthwise, half width-wise, and again in thirds for posting, 30cm by 18cm Sheet torn on right edge of page seven where wax seal was removed and smudging on pages five and six. Red wax seal, adhered to pages 4 and 5

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
The number "22" written in the top left of the first leaf. Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 Novr 27th 1820. To William Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
Sir W. Elford

Ah my dear Sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
, we were forced to illuminate--think of that! An illumination at Three Mile Cross! Forced to put up two dozen of candles upon pain of pelting & rioting & all manner of bad things. So we did--we were very shabby though compared to our neighbours.--one--a retired publican just below--had a fine transparency composed of a pocket handkerchief with the QueenCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
's head upon it--a very fine head in a hat & feathers cocked quite knowingly on the side--Our neighbour the Wheeler above was finer still--he had a shell work grotto in his window gaily lighted up, with the QueenCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
in it for a hermit in the shape of a wax doll with a Friar's gown &a long veil. I ventured all through the squibs to look at these curiosities, & did not get blown up to the moon, as had very nearly been the case with a particular friend of mine in OxfordshireOxfordshire, England | Oxfordshire | England | 51.7612056 -1.2464674000000286 | A county in south east England. Location of Oxford University and Blenheim Palace.--#lmw51.7612056 -1.2464674000000286 who was set on fire last week with a stray rocket & almost frightened &out of her wits. I did not go to ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753--the squibbery there was too much to encounter, & they had only one good hit in that illustrious townReading_city
County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw
. A poor Publican had had a whole length transparency of the Duke of WellingtonArthur Wellesley, Field Marshal, First Duke of Wellington , Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830, and again in 1834 , or: The Iron Duke | Born: 1769-05-01 in Dublin, Ireland. Died: 1852-09-14 in Walmer, Kent.
Before his fame in the Napoleonic Wars, Wellesley served in the Irish House of Commons, and after fighting against Tipu Sultan, the "Tiger of Mysore" in the Siege of Seringapatam he served as the governor of Seringapatam and Mysore in 1799. He was promoted to general during the Peninsular Wars against Napoleon (the battles fought in the Iberian Peninsula), and was granted the title, the First Duke of Wellingto, after Napoleon’s first defeat and exile in 1814. He led the Allied English and European armies in Napoleon’s decisive defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815 . A prominent influence on the Tory party, he served as Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830, and again in 1834 . --#ebb
for the Peace illumination, & not knowing what to get how, he as a matter of economy hung up the noble DukeArthur Wellesley, Field Marshal, First Duke of Wellington , Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830, and again in 1834 , or: The Iron Duke | Born: 1769-05-01 in Dublin, Ireland. Died: 1852-09-14 in Walmer, Kent.
Before his fame in the Napoleonic Wars, Wellesley served in the Irish House of Commons, and after fighting against Tipu Sultan, the "Tiger of Mysore" in the Siege of Seringapatam he served as the governor of Seringapatam and Mysore in 1799. He was promoted to general during the Peninsular Wars against Napoleon (the battles fought in the Iberian Peninsula), and was granted the title, the First Duke of Wellingto, after Napoleon’s first defeat and exile in 1814. He led the Allied English and European armies in Napoleon’s decisive defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815 . A prominent influence on the Tory party, he served as Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830, and again in 1834 . --#ebb
again topsy turvy--bottom upwards--a mixture of drollery & lovingness which took my fancy much--& certainly bad as sheCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
is, she has contrived to trip up the heels of the ministers. One of the best things that I have heard on this occasion was said by our cidevant neighbour the Duke of MarlboroughGeorge Spencer-Churchill, Member of Parliament, Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire, or: 6th Duke of Marlborough, Member of Parliament , Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire | Born: 1793-12-27 in Bill Hill, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1857-01-07 in Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England.
--
.   You know we are famous page 2
for [laugh] laugh Duke's hereabouts. On being asked his opinion of the K and Q. He said "One's bad & the other's worse" "Which does your GraceGeorge Spencer-Churchill, Member of Parliament, Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire, or: 6th Duke of Marlborough, Member of Parliament , Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire | Born: 1793-12-27 in Bill Hill, Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: 1857-01-07 in Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England.
--
put first?   "Either".--This with his stutter as Harry MarshHenry Marsh
MRM's letters in December 1820 indicate that Henry Marsh was involved in a local political tiff with Henry Hart Milman. The rift between Henry Marsh and HH Milman is well documented in The History of Parliament online.--#ebb #alw
gives it, is an amusing piece of truth.--Another for bon mot of Mr. HobhouseJohn Cam Hobhouse, or: 1st Baron Broughton | Born: 1786-06-27 in Redland, England. Died: 1869-06-03 in Berkeley Square, London, England.
A friend and traveling companion of Lord Byron who contributed notes to the fourth canto of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, John Cam Hobhouse was elected to the House of Commons in 1820 as a member of the Whig party. In 1851, he became the First Baron Broughton. --#err #lmw
's I heard the other day--Perhaps you have  seen heard it--They were accusing her of bribing the TimesThe Times.
Newspaper issued daily, begun in London in 1785 as The Daily Universal Register, and titled The Times from 1 January 1788.--#ebb
newspaper & he said--"Well--they have given her the CourierThe Courier. London, England: 1804-04-20-1842-07-06.
London newspaper that ran daily except on Sundays from 1804 to 1842.--#ebb
for six years & it's hard she can't have the TimesThe Times.
Newspaper issued daily, begun in London in 1785 as The Daily Universal Register, and titled The Times from 1 January 1788.--#ebb
for six months"--By the way did you see a very clever parody of the QueenCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
's "answers" in the Courier? They caught Mr. bombast exactly--I never saw better burlesque  I But I have the honor to wish  queen her MajestyCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
a good night we shall talk of a pleasanter subject.

Have you seen Turner's Tour in NormandyAccount of a tour in Normandy. Dawson Turner. London: John & Arthur Arch. 1820. ? It's a pretty book to look at tales of Gothic Architecture.--& not amiss to read. There is not much new in it--but it talks away agreeably enough of old castles & old Churches & old walls & old tombs, & the charm of the subject carries one through. Nobody can know less ^> I do of Gothic architecture (or any architecture) & yet I love it passionately devotedly--An old cathedral is in its effect on my spirits just like MiltonJohn Milton | Born: 1608-12-09. Died: 1674-11-08.
English poet and essayist, best known for his epic poem Paradise Lost (1667).--#esh
's poetry--absorbing, elevating  capturing, overpowering.--If ever I get into one I don't know how to get out.--MotherMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
has been lately at WinchesterWinchester, Hampshire, England | Winchester | Hampshire | England | 51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 | City and county town of Hampshire. Site of Winchester Cathedral and Winchester College, one of the oldest public grammar schools. Jane Austen died here and is buried in the Cathedral. John Keats wrote several of his best-known poems while on a visit to the city.--#lmw51.059771 -1.3101420000000417, where they are restoring the cathedral under the directions of Dr. NottGeorge Frederick Nott | Born: 1768-05-14. Died: 1841-10-25 in Winchester.
Son of Samuel Nott (1740-1793). Clergymen and prebendary of Winchester and superindentant of the Winchester Cathedral restoration --#sbb
. It will be very grand when completed, & they are making new discoveries every day. Above all they have realized a supposition of Mr. MilnerJohn Milner | Born: 1752-10-14. Died: 1826-04-19.
Son of Joseph Milner, tailor and Helen Marsland. A Clergy member of Winchester.--#sbb
's which because it was in that entertaining mass of miracles & papistry hisJohn Milner | Born: 1752-10-14. Died: 1826-04-19.
Son of Joseph Milner, tailor and Helen Marsland. A Clergy member of Winchester.--#sbb
history of WinchesterWinchester, Hampshire, England | Winchester | Hampshire | England | 51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 | City and county town of Hampshire. Site of Winchester Cathedral and Winchester College, one of the oldest public grammar schools. Jane Austen died here and is buried in the Cathedral. John Keats wrote several of his best-known poems while on a visit to the city.--#lmw51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 nobody believed--They have discovered under the old tower a Roman foundation--real genuine masonry--thus giving a colour to the page 3
worthy Bishop's notion that the Church was built on the [piles] of a Roman Temple--& in clearing out the which had been filled up for years with all sorts of rubbish several very fine mitred heads (& their bodies too as far as I know) have been discovered--the most perfect specimen monastic   sculpture that have been found--they are taking casts of them. In the meantime the Chapter are vowing vengeance against Mr. NottGeorge Frederick Nott | Born: 1768-05-14. Died: 1841-10-25 in Winchester.
Son of Samuel Nott (1740-1793). Clergymen and prebendary of Winchester and superindentant of the Winchester Cathedral restoration --#sbb
for spending so much money-- & heGeorge Frederick Nott | Born: 1768-05-14. Died: 1841-10-25 in Winchester.
Son of Samuel Nott (1740-1793). Clergymen and prebendary of Winchester and superindentant of the Winchester Cathedral restoration --#sbb
on his part now that all has been pulled about &   must be set to rights again, feels quite secure in his vocation & has been [terrifying] about Normandy himselfGeorge Frederick Nott | Born: 1768-05-14. Died: 1841-10-25 in Winchester.
Son of Samuel Nott (1740-1793). Clergymen and prebendary of Winchester and superindentant of the Winchester Cathedral restoration --#sbb
picking up new old ideas & setting his prebendal brethren at defiance.--The Cathedral was to have ^been so opened this Autumn with a musick meeting--instead of which it is all to pieces, cannot possibly be finished for these two years & will very probably not be completed in half a dozen. I am heartily glad of this, for these Prebends are all as rich as Jews (few of them I believe with less than four or five thousand a year Church Preferment) & its a fine thing to see that noble & almost loss but flourishing again under the auspices of the Church   its ancient and munificent patroness. Don't you think so?

My dear friendWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
do you read magazines? If you do not pray begin--all the best writing is in them--the best criticism & the best essays--the best fun. I don't mean the old magazine of course, nor half of the new--but some are capital. There's BlackwoodBlackwood’s Magazine. 1817-04-1980.
Founded as a Tory magazine in opposition to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review.--#ebb
's EdinburghEdinburgh Review, second series.
Quarterly political and literary review founded by Francis Jeffrey, Sydney Smith, Henry Brougham, and Francis Horner in 1802 and published by Archibald Constable in Edinburgh. It supported Whig and reformist politics and opposed its Tory and conservative rival, The Quarterly Review. Ceased publication in 1929.--#lmw
for instance with its audacious impudence & its deep & most   intensely felt articles on German literature--its exceedingly good in BlackwoodBlackwood’s Magazine. 1817-04-1980.
Founded as a Tory magazine in opposition to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review.--#ebb
's magazine-- Scott'sWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
wife's in it you know, (Sir WalterWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
)--& WilsonChristopher North
Pseudonym for John Wilson in Blackwood’s Magazine.--#lmw
& LockhartJohn Gibson Lockhart, or: John Gibson Lockhart | Born: 1794-07-12 in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Died: 1854-11-25 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
A prominent writer for Blackwood’s Magazine in its early years, Lockhart joined the staff of the magazine in 1817, and came to be associated with its abrasive style and particularly (though without verification) its insulting characterization of London artists and literary figures as a Cockney School in 1820 and 1821. Assumptions and bitter accusations in the matter led to a bitter personal conflict aired in the pages of Blackwood’s and The London Magazine resulting in the death by duel of The London Magazine’s editor, John Scott in February 1821, at the hands of Lockhart’s literary agent Jonathan Christie . Lockhart married Walter Scott’s daughter Sophia in 1820, which caused John Scott and others to assume that Walter Scott had some involvement with Blackwood’s campaign against the Cockneys. Lockhart took over the editorship of the Quarterly Review from March 1826 until June 1853, shortly before his death. He is perhaps best known as the author of his father-in-law’s 7-volume biography, Life of Walter Scott, published in 1837-1838 .--#ebb
& GilliesRobert Pearse Gillies | Born: 1788 in Arbroath. Died: 1858-11-28 in Kensington.
A contributor to Blackwood's Magazine.--#sbb
& all the EdinburghEdinburgh Review, second series.
Quarterly political and literary review founded by Francis Jeffrey, Sydney Smith, Henry Brougham, and Francis Horner in 1802 and published by Archibald Constable in Edinburgh. It supported Whig and reformist politics and opposed its Tory and conservative rival, The Quarterly Review. Ceased publication in 1929.--#lmw
young wits--youth indeed is its prime characteristic--there is an infusion of new blood in BlackwoodBlackwood’s Magazine. 1817-04-1980.
Founded as a Tory magazine in opposition to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review.--#ebb
's magazine the effect of which is strongly felt in reading one of his numbers just after a number of the Edinburgh Review, second series.
Quarterly political and literary review founded by Francis Jeffrey, Sydney Smith, Henry Brougham, and Francis Horner in 1802 and published by Archibald Constable in Edinburgh. It supported Whig and reformist politics and opposed its Tory and conservative rival, The Quarterly Review. Ceased publication in 1929.--#lmw
--one feels that the review is grown sober & elderly & gray haired--it walks with a stick & wears spectacles.--Then there is a magazine that I like better still than BlackwoodBlackwood’s Magazine. 1817-04-1980.
Founded as a Tory magazine in opposition to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review.--#ebb
's, BaldwinRobert Baldwin | Born: 1780. Died: 1858-01-29.
Printer of the London Magazine; London printer and bookseller. Partners with Charles Cradock and William Joy; published works with them under Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy. Also published under R. Baldwin. See Coles 14. --#lmw
's LondonThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
--The impudence there is quite as great but more polished--there is all the difference between LondonThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
  & a provincial town-- BaldwinRobert Baldwin | Born: 1780. Died: 1858-01-29.
Printer of the London Magazine; London printer and bookseller. Partners with Charles Cradock and William Joy; published works with them under Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy. Also published under R. Baldwin. See Coles 14. --#lmw
's brass is of the finest sort of Corinthian brass--BlackwoodBlackwood’s Magazine. 1817-04-1980.
Founded as a Tory magazine in opposition to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review.--#ebb
's is of baser metal. Charles LambCharles Lamb
British essayist. (10 Feb. 1775-27 Dec. 1834) Born London and died Edmonton, Middlesex. Best known for his Essays of Elia (1823-1833), many of which originally appeared in the London Magazine. --#lmw #cmm
writes there too with his delicate humour, so quiet & graceful & genial & full of fine humanities--& HazlittWilliam Hazlitt | Born: 1778-04-10 in Maidstone, Kent, England. Died: 1830-09-18 in Soho, London, England.
Essayist and critic, acquaintance of Mary Russell Mitford. Author of Table Talk (1821) and The Spirit of the Age (1825). Also authored collections of critical essays such as Characters of Shakespeare (1817), A View of the English Stage (1818), and English Comic Writers (1819). In a letter of 2 October 1820 , Mary Russell Mitford writes of Hazlitt to their mutual friend Haydon, He is the most delightful critic in the [world]-- puts all his taste, his wit, his deep thinking, his matchless acuteness into his subject, but he does not put his whole heart & soul into it [. . . ] What charms me most in Mr. Haslitt is the beautiful candour which he bursts forth sometimes from his own prejudices [ . . . ] I admire him so ardently that when I begin to talk of him I never know how to stop. I could talk on for an hour in a see saw of praise and blame as he himself does of Beaumont & Fletcher & some of his old [favourites]. --#lmw #cmm
--always so delightful. I would not give up the LondonThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
magazine (BaldwinRobert Baldwin | Born: 1780. Died: 1858-01-29.
Printer of the London Magazine; London printer and bookseller. Partners with Charles Cradock and William Joy; published works with them under Baldwin, Cradock, and Joy. Also published under R. Baldwin. See Coles 14. --#lmw
's LondonThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
for there is   another Simon Pure)--no--not for the Scotch novels!--Then there is the New MonthlyNew Monthly Magazine.
Periodical edited by Thomas Campbell from 1821 to 1830. Talfourd was a contributor.--#ebb
which used to be so bad--My particular friend & crony Mr. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
had taken that in hand since last February & his articles are exquisite-- particularly his dramatic criticisms--Those & indeed all that he writes are distinguished by a peculiar spirit of cordiality & indulgence-- heThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
is as various & distinguished in his praise, as other critics are in their censure--you feel that all that he says is fine to the very essence --his likenesses are perfect but heThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
takes people at their best & sets forth their beauties instead of their defects. I never met--not even in Walter ScottWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
with just lenient sympathy--such indulgence to human frailty--or such cordial delight in the beautiful & the good. With all this hisThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
writings are quite as entertaining as if he cut all he touched to mince meat like HazlittWilliam Hazlitt | Born: 1778-04-10 in Maidstone, Kent, England. Died: 1830-09-18 in Soho, London, England.
Essayist and critic, acquaintance of Mary Russell Mitford. Author of Table Talk (1821) and The Spirit of the Age (1825). Also authored collections of critical essays such as Characters of Shakespeare (1817), A View of the English Stage (1818), and English Comic Writers (1819). In a letter of 2 October 1820 , Mary Russell Mitford writes of Hazlitt to their mutual friend Haydon, He is the most delightful critic in the [world]-- puts all his taste, his wit, his deep thinking, his matchless acuteness into his subject, but he does not put his whole heart & soul into it [. . . ] What charms me most in Mr. Haslitt is the beautiful candour which he bursts forth sometimes from his own prejudices [ . . . ] I admire him so ardently that when I begin to talk of him I never know how to stop. I could talk on for an hour in a see saw of praise and blame as he himself does of Beaumont & Fletcher & some of his old [favourites]. --#lmw #cmm
. But it is the nature of the man--he has a talent for admiration & enjoyment--He is to be called to the Bar next term & I prophesy that the world will soon hear of him. I am page 4
sure of his ultimate success but I particularly wish him to make his way soon, because he has been engaged these three years to a sweet young woman, one quite worthy of him, & those long engagements are [hardwearing] things. In case you or Mrs. ElfordElizabeth Walrond Hall, or: Mrs. Elford | Born: 1780 in Manadon, Devon, England. Died: 1839 in Totnes, Devon, England.
Elizabeth was the second wife of Sir William Elford; they married after the death of Mary Davies Elford, on July 5, 1821. She was the daughter and co-heiress of Humphrey Hall of Mandon, Devon, England and his wife, the Hon. Jane St. John, daughter of John St. John, 11th Baron St. John of Bletsoe. She married Maine Swete Waldron, an officer in the Coldstream Guards, in 1803 and they had two children, only one of whom lived to adulthood. Her first husband died around 1817 and she married Sir William Elford four years later. She died at Totnes, Devon in late 1839 and her will was probated on 10 December 1839. Some secondary sources erroneously give the spelling of her first married name as "Waldron;" however, she is not to be confused with the American Elizabeth Waldron (1780 to 21 July 1853).‏ Her birthdate is not given in any standard nineteenth century reference sources, but is likely to be before 1780.--#ebb #ajc #lmw
should see the New MonthlyNew Monthly Magazine.
Periodical edited by Thomas Campbell from 1821 to 1830. Talfourd was a contributor.--#ebb
I enclose you a list of his articles--for except his there are none worth reading. You will forgive the flattery about me. We are old friends you know.

Do you ever paint game and dogs? An adventure happened to my little pet MollyMolly_pet
MRM's dog, whom she describes in a letter of 1820-11-27 as a "pretty little Spaniel with long curling hair--so white & delicate & ladylike".--#ebb
--(the pretty little Spaniel with long curling hair--so white & delicate & ladylike, that you admired so much when I had last the happiness of seeing you) which would make a pretty picture. MollyMolly_pet
MRM's dog, whom she describes in a letter of 1820-11-27 as a "pretty little Spaniel with long curling hair--so white & delicate & ladylike".--#ebb
was beating a hedgerow about a month ago & jumped upon a pheasant--caught hold of it's tail--& held so fast that the bird being a strong old cock & making great efforts for   his life fairly lifted her up in   the air--the struggle lasted till the feathers gave way & the pheasant flew off leaving the honors of his plummage as spoil to poor Molly. PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
says the sight was beautiful-- that it happened in a very fine spot just under an oak pollard with ivy & holly & fern--contrasting its   orange leaves, & the dog & the bird both glittering like gold & silver in a bright autumnal sun.--Goodnight my dear Sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
--I shall finish in a day or two--Goodnight--God bless you, my dear friendWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
--

Tuesday Evening--I really am ashamed of this hand writing though I have found a delicious precedent for illegible calligraphy (is that fine word right?) In Fleury's Memoires de NapoleonMémoires pour servir à l’histoire de la vie privée, du retour, et du règne de Napoléon en 1815. Fleury de Chaboulon. London: Albemarle Street: John Murray. 1819-1820.
Two volume publication: the first volume was published in 1819 and the second in 1820. Fleury was Napoleon's secretary and cabinet member who served in the Emperor's private life.--#sbb #ebb
--He had prepared in Elba proclamatiions for his landing & gave them to his secretary & soldiers to copy when on board the [King]--they could not read them, & gave them to him begging him to decipher such & such words--He could page 5
not read a syllable of them--but after puzzling for a moment threw them into the sea & began to dictate afresh those eloquent addresses which will last as long as the language. What a foundation to write a bad hand! Is it not? But chez les aveugles un langue est roi--so I pass for a good writer here you--you have no notion of the style of manuscript that prevails in this South ofBerkshireBerkshire, England | Berkshire | England | 51.4669939 -1.185367700000029 | The county of Berkshire, England, abbreviated "Berks."--51.4669939 -1.185367700000029--all the young ladies letters look like lines of ms & [us]--& one in particular--that identical friend of mine who was half blown up the other day comes every week to exactly the same disgrace with NapoleonNapoleon Bonaparte
In 1814 when Napoleon was still powerful but on the retreat in Europe, Mary Russell Mitford published a poem titled Napoleon’s Dream in The Poetical Register and Repository of Fugitive Poetry VIII: 215-220 . In the poem, she characterized the military leader and emperor as be-nightmared. Betty Bennett featured an edition of Napoleon’s Dream in her digital collection British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism, 1793-1815 in 2004 . --#ebb
. Not content with knowing French very well in the old way she is learning it over again in a Monsieur Da-Da (I don't know his name--Dafief--I believe--or something like it) Monsieur Da's newfangled method--  by in which the patient (I beg pardon the pupil--one is so apt to mistake one kind of quackery for another) first writes a French sentence & then reads it aloud--how poor Eliza never could read her own writing in her life--so she stands suspected of being a dunce (which is great mistake) every Saturday night.--I shall certainly send you on one of her notes some day just as a foil to set off my clearness.--Or rather to show you that there are people who write worse--a fact respecting which you are rather sceptical. In the mean time I rely on your indulgence & Mrs. E. ElfordElizabeth Walrond Hall, or: Mrs. Elford | Born: 1780 in Manadon, Devon, England. Died: 1839 in Totnes, Devon, England.
Elizabeth was the second wife of Sir William Elford; they married after the death of Mary Davies Elford, on July 5, 1821. She was the daughter and co-heiress of Humphrey Hall of Mandon, Devon, England and his wife, the Hon. Jane St. John, daughter of John St. John, 11th Baron St. John of Bletsoe. She married Maine Swete Waldron, an officer in the Coldstream Guards, in 1803 and they had two children, only one of whom lived to adulthood. Her first husband died around 1817 and she married Sir William Elford four years later. She died at Totnes, Devon in late 1839 and her will was probated on 10 December 1839. Some secondary sources erroneously give the spelling of her first married name as "Waldron;" however, she is not to be confused with the American Elizabeth Waldron (1780 to 21 July 1853).‏ Her birthdate is not given in any standard nineteenth century reference sources, but is likely to be before 1780.--#ebb #ajc #lmw
's--she who is so very good to your poor little friendMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
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I see Mr. ElfordElizabeth Walrond Hall, or: Mrs. Elford | Born: 1780 in Manadon, Devon, England. Died: 1839 in Totnes, Devon, England.
Elizabeth was the second wife of Sir William Elford; they married after the death of Mary Davies Elford, on July 5, 1821. She was the daughter and co-heiress of Humphrey Hall of Mandon, Devon, England and his wife, the Hon. Jane St. John, daughter of John St. John, 11th Baron St. John of Bletsoe. She married Maine Swete Waldron, an officer in the Coldstream Guards, in 1803 and they had two children, only one of whom lived to adulthood. Her first husband died around 1817 and she married Sir William Elford four years later. She died at Totnes, Devon in late 1839 and her will was probated on 10 December 1839. Some secondary sources erroneously give the spelling of her first married name as "Waldron;" however, she is not to be confused with the American Elizabeth Waldron (1780 to 21 July 1853).‏ Her birthdate is not given in any standard nineteenth century reference sources, but is likely to be before 1780.--#ebb #ajc #lmw
is emancipated from his parlimentary chains--those chains of roses of which every body but yourself is so fond--they're I think the jigging backwards & forwards this Summer & Autumn must have fired the distant members exceedingly--Even Mr. MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
who lives so near began to complain.--By the way I hope that excellent person will look to his parting this time--for I shall put it in his power to make a notable mistake an opportunity which to do him justice he very seldom makes. I have just finished a packet for Miss JamesElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
& hers & yours will go to him together--How you will share or you get Miss JamesElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
's. She & I have a perpetual small commerce of needle work-- I am the better artist on muslin--she is a consummate milliner--so I work her frills & flounces & she makes my hats & caps--The present packet consists first of breadth of a frill with directions how to join it to the other half (which went last week) & how to make it up.-- Secondly of thanks for an announced new bonnet--& hints for the construction of the same--(Lord how you would laugh at all this grave palaver about gauze & satin!)--Thirdly of a long engagement about coaches &--(SheElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
is coming here in February on her return from BirminghamBirmingham, West Midlands, England | Birmingham West Midlands Warwickshire England | 52.48624299999999 -1.8904009999999971 | A city in the West Midlands, formerly part of the historic county of Warwickshire. In Mitford’s time, the city was at the center of the Industrial Revolution, with developments in the skilled trades, steam power, railways and canals, and banking beginning in the eighteenth century. During the nineteenth century, the city became the second-largest popular center, after London, and became a center for political radicalism and reform.--#lmw52.48624299999999 -1.8904009999999971 [Gap: 2 chars, reason: torn.] had hoped she come going). Fourthly of an offer to he [Gap: 2 chars, reason: torn.] sister Emily of seeds for her garden (sweetpeas--China aster & mignonettes & such varieties)-- fifthly of an able article, though I say it that should not say it, on Sir Thomas BrownThomas Browne | Born: 1605-10-19 in London, England. Died: 1682-10-19 in Norwich, England.
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's Vulgar Wars (SheElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
is as old English mad as I)-- There's a package for you--if you should get it!!!-- Goodbye my dear friendWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
! Kindest regards from all here, & my most respectful compliements to Mrs. E. ElfordElizabeth Walrond Hall, or: Mrs. Elford | Born: 1780 in Manadon, Devon, England. Died: 1839 in Totnes, Devon, England.
Elizabeth was the second wife of Sir William Elford; they married after the death of Mary Davies Elford, on July 5, 1821. She was the daughter and co-heiress of Humphrey Hall of Mandon, Devon, England and his wife, the Hon. Jane St. John, daughter of John St. John, 11th Baron St. John of Bletsoe. She married Maine Swete Waldron, an officer in the Coldstream Guards, in 1803 and they had two children, only one of whom lived to adulthood. Her first husband died around 1817 and she married Sir William Elford four years later. She died at Totnes, Devon in late 1839 and her will was probated on 10 December 1839. Some secondary sources erroneously give the spelling of her first married name as "Waldron;" however, she is not to be confused with the American Elizabeth Waldron (1780 to 21 July 1853).‏ Her birthdate is not given in any standard nineteenth century reference sources, but is likely to be before 1780.--#ebb #ajc #lmw
.--I write very soon & very long--you see how obedient I am--

& believe me ever
very affectionately your's
M. R. MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
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