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Letter to Mary WebbMary Elizabeth Webb, or: Mary Elizabeth Webb | Born: 1796-04-15 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: .
Close friend and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Mary Webb was born about 1796, the daughter of James Webb, Esq., and Jane Elizabeth Ogbourn. Baptized on April 15, 1796 in Wokingham, Berkshire. Sister of Elizabeth (called "Eliza") and Jane Eleanor Webb and niece of the elder Mary Webb, "Aunt Mary". In Needham’s papers, he notes from the Berkshire Directorythat she lived on Broad street, presumably in Wokingham, Berkshire. She was the wife of Thomas Hawkins, Esq., as she is referred to thus in probate papers of 1858 regarding the wills of her sister Eliza Webb Walter and her husband Henry Walter. Date of death unknown. More research needed.--#scw #lmw
, December 19, 1820 date

Edited by Samantha Webb.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: February 01, 2017. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: DSCF9084.jpg, DSCF9083.jpg, DSCF9082.jpg, DSCF9081.jpg, DSCF9080.jpg, DSCF9079.jpg, DSCF9078.jpg, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
.-->

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT

One sheet of paper, folded in half vertically and in thirds horizontally. All four surfaces contain text. The paper is 18.34cm in length and 11.34cm in height. The address directed to Miss Webb, Wokingham, appears on the first page, which is the left side of the paper; the correspondence begins on the right side and continues to cover the backside of the paper entirely. Sheet (pages three and four) torn on right edge of page three where wax seal was removed. No seal

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
Tuesday Morning. My dear Friend

Our delightful day on Sunday was concluded by a ride home quite as delightful--warm & mild like June--I should be  delight but too happy to repeat it on Thursday but PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
goes early tomorrow morning into HampshireHampshire, England | Hampshire England | 51.05769480000001 -1.3080628999999817 | County on the southern coast of England, known historically as the County of Southampton. The county town is Winchester. Abbreviated "Hants." --#lmw51.05769480000001 -1.3080628999999817 & does not return till Sunday.--Tell dear Aunt MaryMary Webb
Friend ofMary Russell Mitford. Sister or sister-in-law of James Webb and aunt of Eliza, Jane and Mary Webb. Francis Needhamsuggests that she was the basis for the character of Aunt Martha in the Our Villagestory of that title. [Sources: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 16 June 1953 . Needham Papers, Reading Central Library . Relationship to other Webbs and birth and death dates unknown. More research needed.--#scw #lmw
that I thank her a hundred times for her cloak which I return with this--I will not trouble you for Charles the FifthThe History of the Reign of the Emperor Charles V. William Robertson . 1769. as I can get him from the Institution I find. I have set Papa today to hunt in the Index for FiescoDie Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua; or Fiesco’s Conspiracy at Genoa . Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller. Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller von Schiller Johann Christoph Friedrich . --I wonder what hand he'llpage 2
make of it!--I wonder what hand I shall make of it!!! Tom Thumb? Eh, Miss Eliza?--Don't forget to wish to come to the County Meeting--there's a dear--& then you will come. Wishing & willing are everything in this world--NapoleonNapoleon Bonaparte
In 1814 when Napoleon was still powerful but on the retreat in Europe, Mary Russell Mitford published a poem titled Napoleon’s Dream in The Poetical Register and Repository of Fugitive Poetry VIII: 215-220 . In the poem, she characterized the military leader and emperor as be-nightmared. Betty Bennett featured an edition of Napoleon’s Dream in her digital collection British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism, 1793-1815 in 2004 . --#ebb
carried all before him only by the intense power of his will, so why not Mary WebbMary Elizabeth Webb, or: Mary Elizabeth Webb | Born: 1796-04-15 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: .
Close friend and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Mary Webb was born about 1796, the daughter of James Webb, Esq., and Jane Elizabeth Ogbourn. Baptized on April 15, 1796 in Wokingham, Berkshire. Sister of Elizabeth (called "Eliza") and Jane Eleanor Webb and niece of the elder Mary Webb, "Aunt Mary". In Needham’s papers, he notes from the Berkshire Directorythat she lived on Broad street, presumably in Wokingham, Berkshire. She was the wife of Thomas Hawkins, Esq., as she is referred to thus in probate papers of 1858 regarding the wills of her sister Eliza Webb Walter and her husband Henry Walter. Date of death unknown. More research needed.--#scw #lmw
?--Tell your dear FatherJames Webb | Born: 1769 in Hurley, Berkshire, England. Died: 1822-01-11 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England.
Born about 1769 and baptized on February 19, 1769 in Hurley, Berkshire. Prominent manufacturer in the Wokinghambrewing industry, and community leader in Woking and the county of Berkshire. Father of Eliza, Jane, and Mary Webb, and brother (or brother-in-law) of his daughters’ "Aunt Mary," another Mary Webb. Francis Needham suggested that he was the original of the "gentleman" in the Our Villagesketch "Aunt Martha" . Sources: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 16 June 1953 . Needham Papers, Reading Central Library . --#scw #lmw
that I am convinced PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
was mistaken in attributing the abuse of Henry Marsh in the last Reading paper to Mr. MilmanHenry Hart Milman
--#lmw
.[1] The rift between Henry Marsh and Henry Hart Milman is chronicled in the History of Parliament Online.—alw The Greek & the ill nature looked like him--but the writing is too page 3
bad to be by possibility the production of an Editor Elect of the QuarterlyQuarterly Review. 1809-1967.
Tory periodical founded by George Canning in 1809, published by John Murray. William Gifford edited the Quarterly Review from its founding in 1809 until 1824, was succeeded briefly by John Taylor Coleridge in 1825, until John Gibson Lockhart took over as editor from 1826 through 1853. Archived at Romantic Circles, Quarterly Review Archive --#lmw
.[2] We need to trace this reference to a Reading newspaper article. This is perhaps referencing an article written in the Windsor and Reading Eton Express Journal —alw ebb I had not read it on Sunday or I should have said so then--I had not even read your draft, which is very well done indeed--I wish to come & hear you one of these days--for really you & your master must both be extraordinary to have made such a progress in so short a time--The learning those verses from the PhedrePhèdre. Jean Racine. 1677.
A play retelling the plot of the ancient Greek Hyppolytus by Euripedes, concentrating on the character of Phaedra, the stepmother of Hyppolytus. In both plays Phaedra is misinformed of her husband Theseus's death, falls in love with Hyppolytus, and declares her love but is rejected by him. When Theseus returns he blames his son Hyppolytus and seeks vengeance against him.--#ebb
is quite miraculous in such young beginners. It is almost - quite - the most celebrated tirade in French Tragedy.--I don't mean to have such a long speech in FiescoDie Verschwörung des Fiesco zu Genua; or Fiesco’s Conspiracy at Genoa . Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller. Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller von Schiller Johann Christoph Friedrich . to puzzle any future French learner of English--I am considerate to posterity.

--Goodbye my dear & my love--Ever your's--M.R.M.Mary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
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To
Miss Webb
Wokingham