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Letter to Benjamin Robert HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, 1821 March 10

Edited by Amy Colombo.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 25 June 2015. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford Editors. Digital Mitford photo files: 18March1821BRHaydon1a.JPG, 18March1821BRHaydon1b.JPG, 18March1821BRHaydon2a.JPG, 18March1821BRHaydon2b.JPG, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2015.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol.4 ff .441 Horizon No.: 1361550

Paper1 large sheet of paper folded up at the top and bottom, and right and left sides, creating the "envelope." Correspondence on both sides.Address leaf bearing the following postmarks: 1) Black circular mileage stamp readingREADING
[Gap: 1 chars, reason: illegible.] 2) Red double circle Duty stamp reading B
12 MR 12
1821
3) Sepia-inked oval Delivery stamp reading [Gap: 1 chars, reason: illegible.]
* MR * 12 *
1821 F.N. n 4) Red crown Franking Stamp; appears to be crossed out A portion of the letter has been torn away under the sealRemnant of red oval-shaped wax seal

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the begining of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford's spelling and hypenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements "choice," "sic," and "reg" to encode both Mitford's spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
March 10th 1821..

I cannot tell you, my dear Mr HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, how much I admire the letter I have just received from you. I return the two you ask for, & I do not wait for a frank or a private conveyance because it appears to me that you would rather pay triple postage than not destroy them immediately. At the same time I feel myself bound to acknowledge that I mentioned to Miss JamesElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
something of what you said of Mr. ScottJohn Scott, or: John Scott | Born: 1784-10-24 in Broadgate, Aberdeen. Died: 1821-02-21 in Chalk Farm.
Editor who revived The London Magazine in 1820 and edited it until his death on 27 February 1821. Died as the result of a gunshot wound received in a duel fought on 16 February with Jonathan Henry Christie (John Gibson Lockhart’s agent) at Chalk Farm. The duel resulted from an escalation of attacks and counterattacks between the editors of the London and Blackwood’s Magazines over Blackwood’s characterizations of a Cockney School.--#lmw #ebb
--I shall write to her immediately & transcribe for her benefit the expression of noble feeling which I now have before me, & I know that she will admire & respect you fifty times more than ever. I also, in writing an account of the Duel to a friend abroad, repeated nearly your words (but I hope & believe without mentioning your name) as a proof that Mr. ScottJohn Scott, or: John Scott | Born: 1784-10-24 in Broadgate, Aberdeen. Died: 1821-02-21 in Chalk Farm.
Editor who revived The London Magazine in 1820 and edited it until his death on 27 February 1821. Died as the result of a gunshot wound received in a duel fought on 16 February with Jonathan Henry Christie (John Gibson Lockhart’s agent) at Chalk Farm. The duel resulted from an escalation of attacks and counterattacks between the editors of the London and Blackwood’s Magazines over Blackwood’s characterizations of a Cockney School.--#lmw #ebb
's temper might possibly have been to blame. To her I shall also write in [Gap: reason: torn.][a] day or two. After this confession, which I could not excuse [Gap: reason: torn.][myse]lf from making, can   I ever expect to hear from you a[Gap: reason: torn.][gain]! I can only say that I intended no treachery--& that I throw myself entirely upon your mercy. The Scotch letter is quite a different affair--I return it uncopied--but you will not find it so severe as you expect. Read it over before you burn it--& if you like it better than you expected keep it for me. I hope you won't take a fancy to desire any more of your letters--I keep them like the apple of my eye.--There is no talking of this melancholy duel--it is too dreadful--He was with Mr. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
in good spirits that very morning. What a pity that he had not the firmness to say at once to Mr. LockhartJohn Gibson Lockhart, or: John Gibson Lockhart | Born: 1794-07-12 in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Died: 1854-11-25 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
A prominent writer for Blackwood’s Magazine in its early years, Lockhart joined the staff of the magazine in 1817, and came to be associated with its abrasive style and particularly (though without verification) its insulting characterization of London artists and literary figures as a Cockney School in 1820 and 1821. Assumptions and bitter accusations in the matter led to a bitter personal conflict aired in the pages of Blackwood’s and The London Magazine resulting in the death by duel of The London Magazine’s editor, John Scott in February 1821, at the hands of Lockhart’s literary agent Jonathan Christie . Lockhart married Walter Scott’s daughter Sophia in 1820, which caused John Scott and others to assume that Walter Scott had some involvement with Blackwood’s campaign against the Cockneys. Lockhart took over the editorship of the Quarterly Review from March 1826 until June 1853, shortly before his death. He is perhaps best known as the author of his father-in-law’s 7-volume biography, Life of Walter Scott, published in 1837-1838 .--#ebb
that he would not fight on a Literary quarrel. This is a woman's view of the question--but even amongst honourablehonorable men there would have been no dishonourdishonor I should think in such a declaration. Or even if he had fought Mr. LockhartJohn Gibson Lockhart, or: John Gibson Lockhart | Born: 1794-07-12 in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Died: 1854-11-25 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
A prominent writer for Blackwood’s Magazine in its early years, Lockhart joined the staff of the magazine in 1817, and came to be associated with its abrasive style and particularly (though without verification) its insulting characterization of London artists and literary figures as a Cockney School in 1820 and 1821. Assumptions and bitter accusations in the matter led to a bitter personal conflict aired in the pages of Blackwood’s and The London Magazine resulting in the death by duel of The London Magazine’s editor, John Scott in February 1821, at the hands of Lockhart’s literary agent Jonathan Christie . Lockhart married Walter Scott’s daughter Sophia in 1820, which caused John Scott and others to assume that Walter Scott had some involvement with Blackwood’s campaign against the Cockneys. Lockhart took over the editorship of the Quarterly Review from March 1826 until June 1853, shortly before his death. He is perhaps best known as the author of his father-in-law’s 7-volume biography, Life of Walter Scott, published in 1837-1838 .--#ebb
with such a man as Mr. Horace SmithHorace Horatio Smith Smith, or: Smith Horatio | Born: 1779-12-31 in London. Died: 1849-07-12 in Tunbridge Wells.
Poet, parodist, playwright, and successful stockbroker, friend of Percy Bysshe Shelley, and member of Leigh Hunt’s circle. Horace and his older brother James wrote and published Rejected Addresses: Or, The New Theatrum Poetarum in 1812 , which parodied the styles of 21 poets and dramatists in a series of fake addresses to be delivered on stage and supposedly rejected by the managers of Drury Lane Theatre for a competition they had sponsored to celebrate the rebuilding of their theater in October 1812 following a fire. Poets parodied by the Smith brothers included Lord Byron, Walter Scott, Robert Southey, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and William Wordsworth. Horace Smith and Percy Shelley drafted a competing pair of sonnets on Egyptian antiquities, each published in The Examiner (Shelley’s was published on 11 January and Smith’s on 1 February of 1818), and of the two, Shelley’s Ozymandias became far better known. Romantic Circles hosts a digital edition of Smith’s sonnet, On a Stupendous Leg of Granite, Discovered Standing by Itself in the Deserts of Egypt, with the Inscription Inserted Below . http://viaf.org/viaf/207338554/--#ebb
for his second-- any thinganything rather than this miserable end. I hope Mr. Pattmore PatmorePeter George Patmore | Born: 1786 in Ludgate Hill, London, England. Died: 1855.
Frequent periodical contributer. In the early 1820s, he authored, "Picture Galleries of England," a series of art criticism essays in the New Monthly Magazine. In 1821 Patmore acted as second to journalist John Scott in the duel in which Scott was killed. Tried for murder and acquitted for his role in the duel. Editor of the New Monthly Magazine from 1841 . Source: ODNB. --#ajc #lmw
will be severely dealt with --Mr. Lockhart'sJohn Gibson Lockhart, or: John Gibson Lockhart | Born: 1794-07-12 in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Died: 1854-11-25 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
A prominent writer for Blackwood’s Magazine in its early years, Lockhart joined the staff of the magazine in 1817, and came to be associated with its abrasive style and particularly (though without verification) its insulting characterization of London artists and literary figures as a Cockney School in 1820 and 1821. Assumptions and bitter accusations in the matter led to a bitter personal conflict aired in the pages of Blackwood’s and The London Magazine resulting in the death by duel of The London Magazine’s editor, John Scott in February 1821, at the hands of Lockhart’s literary agent Jonathan Christie . Lockhart married Walter Scott’s daughter Sophia in 1820, which caused John Scott and others to assume that Walter Scott had some involvement with Blackwood’s campaign against the Cockneys. Lockhart took over the editorship of the Quarterly Review from March 1826 until June 1853, shortly before his death. He is perhaps best known as the author of his father-in-law’s 7-volume biography, Life of Walter Scott, published in 1837-1838 .--#ebb
feelings must be severely tried.--I hear from every bodyeverybody of the surpassing beauty of your new picture. Many thanks for the ExaminerThe Examiner, A Sunday paper, on politics, domestic economy, and theatricals. 1808-1886.
Weekly periodical launched by editor Leigh Hunt and his brother, the printer John Hunt. Mitford’s correspondence demonstrates that her household subscribed or regularly had access to The Examiner and The London Magazine.--#ebb
--How could he think of his crabbed politics when he was writing on such a subject! That Mr. Robert HuntRobert Hunt
Writer and critic. Brother of Leigh Hunt and John Hunt who founded The Examiner. One of the earliest reviewers of William Blake.--#ajc
is--I have not room to say what. -- Yes DaphneDaphne
Mitford’s dog, a female greyhound. However, there is also a pug named Daphne in the Our Village sketch Our Godmothers from 3: 1828, 266-287 . That Daphne was a particularly ugly, noisy pug, that barked at every body that came into the house, and bit at most.--#lmw
has killed three hares. Did notpage 2
you receive a brace marked on the direction as her killing? She would have killed more. I dare say if she had seen them but she had been so delicate & I have so dosed my FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
with cautions about her that he has only taken ^her out two or three times the whole season for fear of me. Oh what a vixen I must be! -- He says she is exceedingly fast.--after all the [Gap: 1 word, reason: torn.] widow has played us false--she says the puppy died -- but I am afraid she sold it--indeed PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
says he is sure she did. Ours is however well & flourishing & shall be yours -- you must not say a word against this arrangement which is as fixed as fate. I am only very sorry that the one you selected & whose colourcolor you probably preferred should page 
have been lost. This is my fault too--I liked the woman & persuaded PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
to put the puppy there under the notion of its being taken better care of -- & I can still by no means comprehend how a person with such a voice manner & countenance can be dishonest--she looked like Truth itself.--Ah I am a sad blundering friend & deserve to be turned off.--

Adieu my dear Mr. HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
--Forgive me if you can & be sure that I am always most & sincerely & affectionately your's M R Mitford.
. Best respects from my FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
&MotherMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
To B.R. HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
Esqre
St. John's Place
Lisson Grove North
Regent's Park
LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223