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Letter to Benjamin Robert HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, 18 April 1821.

Edited by Samantha Webb.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 4 July 2014. P5. Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. 18April1821BRHaydon1b, 18April1821BRHaydon1c, 18April1821BRHaydon2a, 18April1821BRHaydon2b, 18April1821BRHaydon3a, 18April1821BRHaydon3b, 18April1821BRHaydon4a, 18April1821BRHaydon4b, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 ff.435

One large sheet of folio paper folded in half and then in nines to expose the address leaf.Circular non-circumscribed mileage stamp in faint black ink: READING
AP20
1821Circular double-circumscribed sepia-inked duty stamp: B
21 AP21
1821Delivery stamp in red ink in the shape of a circumscribed oval: 10'o'Clock
AP*21
1821
F. NIIA large 7 denoting the fee is scrawled in black ink across the address lines.Fragments of a red wax seal are evident on either side of the address leaf.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
April 18 1821.Three Mile CrossMy dear Sir

I have been waiting till Easter should bring some Parliament men into the Country to thank you for your delightful account of your GlasgowGlasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland | Glasgow | Lanarkshire | Scotland | 55.864237 -4.251805999999988 | Largest city in Scotland, on the River Clyde. Historically part of the county of Lanarkshire. Since the eighteenth century, an important center of trade and emigration with the Americas. Also a key center of the Industrial Revolution, particularly in shipbuilding and related industries.--#lmw55.864237 -4.251805999999988 excursion[1] HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
had recently returned from Scotland, where he had exhibited his painting, Christ's Entry Into JerusalemChrist’s Entry into Jerusalem. Benjamin Robert Haydon.
One of Haydon’s three enormous paintings of biblical scenes, together with The Judgment of Solomon and The Resurrection of Lazarus. The ODNB notes the dimensions of Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem as "12 ft 6 in. × 15 ft 1 in., with a frame weighing 600 lb." Exhibited at Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London. Wiliam Wordsworth’s head appears in the picture. Now housed in the Athenaeum of Ohio Art Collection of Mount St. Mary’s Seminary. [Source: ODNB]--#ebb
.—#scw
--Oh what an honour & a pleasure it is to be selected as a friend to whom you like “to unburthen your thoughts”--& how heartily I sympathised with all your feelings whether stern or relenting--I had been waiting for a frank to tell you this--but I suppose indignation is a stonger impulse than pleasure for since I received the ExaminerThe Examiner, A Sunday paper, on politics, domestic economy, and theatricals. 1808-1886.
Weekly periodical launched by editor Leigh Hunt and his brother, the printer John Hunt. Mitford’s correspondence demonstrates that her household subscribed or regularly had access to The Examiner and The London Magazine.--#ebb
this morning I can no longer refrain from writing. I had read the Article in the MagazineThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
wondering who could be meant--thinking how likely it was to be misrepresented but never for an instant dreaming that it could be aimed at you--of all impossible slanders that seemed the most impossible--& I am even now lost in astonishment at such a malicious  falsehood's finding a place in so respectable a publication.[2] Mitford has just read HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
's short retort, "Alleged Inhumanity of a Living Artist" published in the ExaminerThe Examiner, A Sunday paper, on politics, domestic economy, and theatricals. 1808-1886.
Weekly periodical launched by editor Leigh Hunt and his brother, the printer John Hunt. Mitford’s correspondence demonstrates that her household subscribed or regularly had access to The Examiner and The London Magazine.--#ebb
's current issue of 15 April 1821
, in which he identifies himself as the unspecified "living artist" recently targeted in the April 1821 issue of The London MagazineThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
, in "The British Institution". The London Magazine piece was an anonymous review of an art exhibition in which Haydon did not participate, but in which Edwin Landseer's Seizure of a Boar reminds the writer of an anecdote about "a living artist who, when a child was run over by a cart, before its own loved home, and the bankrupt mother stood rigid as stone, staring with maniac agony on her crushed darling, calmly and deliberately gazed on her 'to study the expression,' as he called it!! I care not to know his name. . . but let me take this opportunity to assure him, that, as a man, I hold him in the most sovereign contempt, not to say detestation!" (page 438)
. In his prompt rejoinder, Haydon identified himself as the "living artist," and described the circumstances of the encounter: "About eight years ago, while the living Artist alluded to was accidentally approaching Temple BarTemple, London, England | Temple | London | England | 51.5123032 -0.1110459000000219 | District in central London, traditional location for barristers’ chambers and other offices for legal practice, with its four Inns of Court. The Inner Temple, one of the four Inns of Court, was responsible for training and licensing barristers. Talfourd had chambers in this neighborhood, although not in the Inner Temple, and Mitford addressed letters to him there.--#ebb #err51.5123032 -0.1110459000000219, he saw suddenly a great crowd, and heard the screams of some poor woman in great agony! He ran on with many other gentlemen and squeezing near enough to give her aid, found a poor creature turning her head from one side ot the other, beating away the people who offered to calm her, and screaming on 'her dear boy' with a dry, parched, agitated hoarseness!--The people at last forced her into a house, and upon his inquiring what had happened, he found that she had permitted her boy to hold a horse and to mount it, and that the poor little fellow had been thrown and trampled on. Now, Sir, this is the truth and nothing but the truth, whereas in the London MagazineThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
, the living Artist is made to witness unmoved a dear little child crushed by a cart wheel! and indifferent to its horrid condition, deliberately to walk up to the mother without feeling, sympathy, or pain; quietly to look in her face, and enraptured to study her expression!" Haydon continues that the child did not die of the accident, that the mother's face did not stare rigidly but was luridly animated, and that "The living Artist has often related this affecting incident to his friends, and has added, that his coming in contact with such a dreadful expression in Nature, at the very moment he was painting the real mother in the Judgment of SolomonThe Judgment of Solomon. Benjamin Robert Haydon.
The earliest of the three enormous biblical paintings for which Haydon was known, completed in 1814.--#ebb
, enabled him to give that look of 'agonized faintness' which it has been thought by every mother he has succeeded in giving."—#ebb
I suppose that as there is now no regular Editor the venom slid in undetected.[3] The April 1821 issue of The London MagazineThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
announced the death of its founding editor, John Scott, who had on 16 February fallen in a duelDuel of John Scott and Jonathan ChristieScottChristie_Duel - 1821-02-16
The duel which led to John Scott’s death, brought on by escalating conflicts between John Scott and John Gibson Lockhart in The London Magazine and Blackwood’s Magazine, rooted in Blackwood’s insulting characterizations of a Cockney School beginning in 1820. Christie was Lockhart’s literary agent, and after a trial in April 1821 he was acquitted of any wrongdoing in the duel. For a detailed account of the duel, with supporting documents in publications from each magazine, see Lord Byron and His Times: "Blackwood’s Magazine, The London Magazine, and the Scott-Christie Duel".--#ebb
with Jonathan ChristieJonathan Henry Christie | Born: 1793-11-04. Died: 1876-04-15.
Fought the duel on 27 February 1821 with John Scott that resulted in Scott’s death; after a trial in April 1821, he was acquitted of murder; James Traill was his second. Christie was the literary agent of J. G. Lockhart.--#lmw
, John Gibson LockhartJohn Gibson Lockhart, or: John Gibson Lockhart | Born: 1794-07-12 in Lanarkshire, Scotland. Died: 1854-11-25 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
A prominent writer for Blackwood’s Magazine in its early years, Lockhart joined the staff of the magazine in 1817, and came to be associated with its abrasive style and particularly (though without verification) its insulting characterization of London artists and literary figures as a Cockney School in 1820 and 1821. Assumptions and bitter accusations in the matter led to a bitter personal conflict aired in the pages of Blackwood’s and The London Magazine resulting in the death by duel of The London Magazine’s editor, John Scott in February 1821, at the hands of Lockhart’s literary agent Jonathan Christie . Lockhart married Walter Scott’s daughter Sophia in 1820, which caused John Scott and others to assume that Walter Scott had some involvement with Blackwood’s campaign against the Cockneys. Lockhart took over the editorship of the Quarterly Review from March 1826 until June 1853, shortly before his death. He is perhaps best known as the author of his father-in-law’s 7-volume biography, Life of Walter Scott, published in 1837-1838 .--#ebb
's literary agent. Scott challenged Christie to the duel over what Scott took to be a personal insult, rooted in an escalating conflict between his London Magazine and what he took to be Lockhart's writings in Blackwood's MagazineBlackwood’s Magazine. 1817-04-1980.
Founded as a Tory magazine in opposition to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review.--#ebb
caricaturing a Cockney Schoolthe Cockney School
Satirical term coined by an anonymous Blackwood’s article of October 1817 targeting a circle of intellectuals, writers, and artists specifically including John Keats, William Hazlitt, Leigh Hunt, and Benjamin Robert Haydon.--#ebb
of LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 writers and artists. William HazlittWilliam Hazlitt | Born: 1778-04-10 in Maidstone, Kent, England. Died: 1830-09-18 in Soho, London, England.
Essayist and critic, acquaintance of Mary Russell Mitford. Author of Table Talk (1821) and The Spirit of the Age (1825). Also authored collections of critical essays such as Characters of Shakespeare (1817), A View of the English Stage (1818), and English Comic Writers (1819). In a letter of 2 October 1820 , Mary Russell Mitford writes of Hazlitt to their mutual friend Haydon, He is the most delightful critic in the [world]-- puts all his taste, his wit, his deep thinking, his matchless acuteness into his subject, but he does not put his whole heart & soul into it [. . . ] What charms me most in Mr. Haslitt is the beautiful candour which he bursts forth sometimes from his own prejudices [ . . . ] I admire him so ardently that when I begin to talk of him I never know how to stop. I could talk on for an hour in a see saw of praise and blame as he himself does of Beaumont & Fletcher & some of his old [favourites]. --#lmw #cmm
had taken over as editor of The London MagazineThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
for the April 1821 issue
. MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
's surprise that The London MagazineThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
would print an implicit insult to HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
is certainly warranted, since Haydon had long been a friend of John ScottJohn Scott, or: John Scott | Born: 1784-10-24 in Broadgate, Aberdeen. Died: 1821-02-21 in Chalk Farm.
Editor who revived The London Magazine in 1820 and edited it until his death on 27 February 1821. Died as the result of a gunshot wound received in a duel fought on 16 February with Jonathan Henry Christie (John Gibson Lockhart’s agent) at Chalk Farm. The duel resulted from an escalation of attacks and counterattacks between the editors of the London and Blackwood’s Magazines over Blackwood’s characterizations of a Cockney School.--#lmw #ebb
(Source: ODNB]).—#ebb
I am almost glad that it did since it has afforded you an opportunity of making a defence & dignified & so spirited--What a necessary thing it is that a great painter should be a good writer! And really in these days when the appetite for anecdote as it is called (that is for scandal) is so [craving] & the gossip of a set of unidea'd women over a country tea table yields in malice to the slander of literary chit chat, every man should be brought to wield the pen as a weapon of defence against his enemies his rivals & his friends. Do you know to which class the present writer belongs?--I will not talk of him any more for it really gives me unwomanly feelings--to use a womanly phrase it puts me in a passion.----[4] Here Mitford's long dash signals a change of topic, effectively a paragraph break.—#ebb

What became of your poor GlasgowGlasgow, Lanarkshire, Scotland | Glasgow | Lanarkshire | Scotland | 55.864237 -4.251805999999988 | Largest city in Scotland, on the River Clyde. Historically part of the county of Lanarkshire. Since the eighteenth century, an important center of trade and emigration with the Americas. Also a key center of the Industrial Revolution, particularly in shipbuilding and related industries.--#lmw55.864237 -4.251805999999988 culprit? Did he come back to London according to your behest? And is he likely topage 2
turn honest & make his way in the world?[5] We have not yet identified this "Glasgow culprit" from our review of HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
's published correspondence.—#ebb
I think if any thing   could reform a man your severity of words & kindness of action would do so.

I think you know my friend Mrs HoflandBarbara Wreaks Hofland | Born: 1770 in Yorkshire. Died: 1844-11-04 in Richmond-on-Thames.
Novelist and writer of children’s books popular in England and America, Barbara Hofland was a native of Sheffield, Yorkshire, where she published poems from July 1794 in the local newspaper, The Sheffield Iris. Her first marriage to Thomas Bradshawe Hoole left her widowed and in poverty, raising a son, Frederic, on her own, and she supported herself by publishing poems and children’s books, and by running a girl’s school in Harrogate. second marriage was to the artist Thomas Christopher Hofland. (Source: ODNB)--#ebb
I have just had a letter from Miss JamesElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
containing so remarkable an anecdote respecting her that I am tempted to transcribe it--To understand it I must tell you that Mrs HoflandBarbara Wreaks Hofland | Born: 1770 in Yorkshire. Died: 1844-11-04 in Richmond-on-Thames.
Novelist and writer of children’s books popular in England and America, Barbara Hofland was a native of Sheffield, Yorkshire, where she published poems from July 1794 in the local newspaper, The Sheffield Iris. Her first marriage to Thomas Bradshawe Hoole left her widowed and in poverty, raising a son, Frederic, on her own, and she supported herself by publishing poems and children’s books, and by running a girl’s school in Harrogate. second marriage was to the artist Thomas Christopher Hofland. (Source: ODNB)--#ebb
has been for several years involved in a ChanceryCourt of Chancery
Court founded in Norman England, adjudicating equity cases with a tradition of leniency. This court had powers to cancel debts in cases of poverty.--#ebb
suit on the success of which they had placed great reliance.[6] The National Archives documents multiple Chancery suits, with records dating 1813, 1814, and 1818 involving ThomasThomas Christopher Hofland | Born: 1777-12-25 in Nottinghamshire. Died: 1843-01-03 in Leamington Spa.
Landscape painter, and second husband of the author Barbara Hofland.--#ebb
and Barbara HoflandBarbara Wreaks Hofland | Born: 1770 in Yorkshire. Died: 1844-11-04 in Richmond-on-Thames.
Novelist and writer of children’s books popular in England and America, Barbara Hofland was a native of Sheffield, Yorkshire, where she published poems from July 1794 in the local newspaper, The Sheffield Iris. Her first marriage to Thomas Bradshawe Hoole left her widowed and in poverty, raising a son, Frederic, on her own, and she supported herself by publishing poems and children’s books, and by running a girl’s school in Harrogate. second marriage was to the artist Thomas Christopher Hofland. (Source: ODNB)--#ebb
as plaintiffs against Francis Hoole, Joseph Wreaks, Job Baseby Rolls and Frederick Parkin Hoole. The surnames Wreaks and Hoole suggest connections on Barbara Hofland's side, as Hoole was the name of her first husband and Wreaks was her maiden name.—#ebb
(Ah I could have told them what a miserable thing is a successful Chancery suit!) Now for Miss James'sElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
letter
. "The Hofland suit is decided in their favour--but all the costs being to be paid out of the property not a sixpence Mrs. Hof.Barbara Wreaks Hofland | Born: 1770 in Yorkshire. Died: 1844-11-04 in Richmond-on-Thames.
Novelist and writer of children’s books popular in England and America, Barbara Hofland was a native of Sheffield, Yorkshire, where she published poems from July 1794 in the local newspaper, The Sheffield Iris. Her first marriage to Thomas Bradshawe Hoole left her widowed and in poverty, raising a son, Frederic, on her own, and she supported herself by publishing poems and children’s books, and by running a girl’s school in Harrogate. second marriage was to the artist Thomas Christopher Hofland. (Source: ODNB)--#ebb
says will come to them. Their lawyer had neglected to write & the news of the decision was brought by a neighbour who told her only that it was decided in their favour--she went to Town to enquire was[and] was quite overcome by the information she received--& was about to mount the outside of the Twickenham CoachTwickenham Coach or Stage to return all amort as you may suppose when recollecting she should save sixpence in going by the Richmond StageRichmond Coach or Stage & such an one being on hand,--she withdrew her foot although a most respectable woman with her husband at her side affected to make room for her--Home she came by the Richmond CoachRichmond Coach or Stage & saved her sixpence & her life. The Twickenham CoachTwickenham Coach or Stage was overturned an hour after & that decent woman in whose place she would have sat killed on the spot. The husband had his collar bone & a rib broken. This most striking event gave a new & just turn to her thoughts--I am sure you will feel as thankful as I did at the detail which she gave in her most pathetic manner." _____

Having begun storytelling I must tell you  anothera story which comes from GermanyGermany | 51.165691 10.451526000000058 | A country in central-western Europe. Berlin is the capital and largest city.--#bas51.165691 10.451526000000058. The King of Naples[7] Possibly this a story about King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies, also Ferdinand IV of Naples (1751 - 1825)Ferdinand I King of the Two Sicilies Ferdinand IV King of Naples King of Sicily | Born: 1751-01-12 in Naples, Naples. Died: 1825-01-04 in Naples, Two Sicilies.
Deposed by Napoleon in 1805, and earlier by the short-lived (6-months) Parthenopean Republic uprising in 1799, Ferdinand IV became Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies after the restoration of monarchies following Napoleon’s defeat. --#ebb
, though it is hard to tell if the anecdote is current.—#ebb
having arrived at Laybach before the other sovereigns  ofwas desirous to have the amusement of bear hunting which of course was to be provided for him but there being page 3
no bears resident in the neighbourhood one was purchased of a Savoyard & placed a few miles out of Town in a thicket. The King attended as the story went by a train of cars & courtiers arrived near the place & the Bear finding himself in the neighbourhood of so much good company fancied he was to perform as usual came out on his hind legs in a most graceful attitude--which alas! had an effect on the hard heart of his Neopolitan Majesty who discharged his piece & shot him dead. This story is none of my radical inventions--it came from Lord AshburtonAlexander Baring, First Baron Ashburton | Born: 1774-10-27. Died: 1848-05-13 in Longleat, Wiltshire, England.
--
to Sir W. ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
& from him to me. ____

I have a great grievance just now which I have nothing [Damage: 3 word, agent: .][all to] do with--but which I cannot help thinking a grievance nevertheless. The Duke of WellingtonArthur Wellesley, Field Marshal, First Duke of Wellington , Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830, and again in 1834 , or: The Iron Duke | Born: 1769-05-01 in Dublin, Ireland. Died: 1852-09-14 in Walmer, Kent.
Before his fame in the Napoleonic Wars, Wellesley served in the Irish House of Commons, and after fighting against Tipu Sultan, the "Tiger of Mysore" in the Siege of Seringapatam he served as the governor of Seringapatam and Mysore in 1799. He was promoted to general during the Peninsular Wars against Napoleon (the battles fought in the Iberian Peninsula), and was granted the title, the First Duke of Wellingto, after Napoleon’s first defeat and exile in 1814. He led the Allied English and European armies in Napoleon’s decisive defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815 . A prominent influence on the Tory party, he served as Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830, and again in 1834 . --#ebb
's sons are at home for the EtonEton College
Boarding school for boys, located in Eton, Berkshire.--#ebb
holidays & they come every day to a little alehouse next door to learn French of a Jew who is lodging there for the purpose of teaching them. "The poor little lads Ma'amMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
", said my friend the Landlord, "are kept very strict. They never look up but their tutor corrects them, & there they sit in my parlour from eleven to half past four & never have a glass of any thing." Without sympathising very deeply in the misfortune which my friend the Alehouse keeper with a true tap-room feeling considers as worst of all, I am quite indignant at the poor little boys being cheated of their holidays. Is it not abominable?--A worse iniquity than  cheating beating NapoleonNapoleon Bonaparte
In 1814 when Napoleon was still powerful but on the retreat in Europe, Mary Russell Mitford published a poem titled Napoleon’s Dream in The Poetical Register and Repository of Fugitive Poetry VIII: 215-220 . In the poem, she characterized the military leader and emperor as be-nightmared. Betty Bennett featured an edition of Napoleon’s Dream in her digital collection British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism, 1793-1815 in 2004 . --#ebb
.[8] A reference to WellingtonArthur Wellesley, Field Marshal, First Duke of Wellington , Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830, and again in 1834 , or: The Iron Duke | Born: 1769-05-01 in Dublin, Ireland. Died: 1852-09-14 in Walmer, Kent.
Before his fame in the Napoleonic Wars, Wellesley served in the Irish House of Commons, and after fighting against Tipu Sultan, the "Tiger of Mysore" in the Siege of Seringapatam he served as the governor of Seringapatam and Mysore in 1799. He was promoted to general during the Peninsular Wars against Napoleon (the battles fought in the Iberian Peninsula), and was granted the title, the First Duke of Wellingto, after Napoleon’s first defeat and exile in 1814. He led the Allied English and European armies in Napoleon’s decisive defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815 . A prominent influence on the Tory party, he served as Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830, and again in 1834 . --#ebb
's famous defeat of NapoleonNapoleon Bonaparte
In 1814 when Napoleon was still powerful but on the retreat in Europe, Mary Russell Mitford published a poem titled Napoleon’s Dream in The Poetical Register and Repository of Fugitive Poetry VIII: 215-220 . In the poem, she characterized the military leader and emperor as be-nightmared. Betty Bennett featured an edition of Napoleon’s Dream in her digital collection British War Poetry in the Age of Romanticism, 1793-1815 in 2004 . --#ebb
at the Battle of WaterlooBattle of Waterloobattle - Waterloo - 1815-06-18
The battle fought at Waterloo, Belgium on Sunday, 18 June 1815 that decisively defeated Napoleon Bonaparte after his Hundred Days Exile.--#ebb
.—#ad
When they ought to be playing cricket or stealing bird's nests or doing mischief or doing nothing.--The Battle of WaterlooBattle of Waterloobattle - Waterloo - 1815-06-18
The battle fought at Waterloo, Belgium on Sunday, 18 June 1815 that decisively defeated Napoleon Bonaparte after his Hundred Days Exile.--#ebb
was   a [joke] to this wickedness. The only thing that even looks like the holidays is their mode of conveyance which is generally five in a gig rain or shine.

Pray did you get a little letter which I sent to you at Glasgow--It is not worth asking for.--My FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
& MotherMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
join in kindest remembrances & I am ever

My dear Mr. HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw


Most sincerely and affectionately yours
Mary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
M. R. Mitford.
page 4

Were you not very affected at the death of poor John [Keats?]John Keats | Born: 1795-10-31 in Moorgate, London. Died: 1821-02-23 in Rome. [9] The April 1821 issue of The London MagazineThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
to which MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
refers earlier in this letter also contained an article on the "Death of Mr. John Keats" on pages 426-427
.—#ebb
There is another proof of the terrible personality of the age. If he had lived I think his name would have been second only to WordsworthWilliam Wordsworth | Born: 1770-04-07 in Cockermouth, England. Died: 1850-04-23 in Cumberland, England. amongst the Poets of the day--Indeed even now there are parts of EndymionEndymion. John Keats. which surely no other man could have written.

I am happy to tell you that after a great deal of enquiry & some threats we have succeeded in regaining your greyhound puppy & have placed him in very good   summer quarters. He is the largest young dog I ever saw in my life & gives promise of great strength--Once more Farewell.

B.R. Haydon, Esqre
St. John's PlaceSt. John’s Place, Lisson Grove, Regent’s Park, London, England | Lisson Grove | Regent’s Park | London | England | 51.5361, -0.1751 | St. John’s Wood | Occasional residence from 1817 onward of Benjamin Robert Haydon in Lisson Grove, Regent’s Park, London. Site of Haydon’s famous dinner gathering with guests William Wordsworth, John Keats, Charles Lamb, Thomas Monkhouse, and Joseph Ritchie on 28 December 1817. Haydon’s enormous painting, Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem hung in Haydon’s painting room as background.--#ghb #ebb51.5361, -0.1751
Lisson GroveLisson Grove, Westminster, London, England | Lisson Grove | Westminster | London | England | 51.5247788 -0.16831469999999626 | District in the City of Westminster, London, west of Regent’s Park. Student artists and painters from the Royal Academy lived in this district in the early nineteenth century, including William Blake, Richard Cosway, and Benjamin Robert Haydon. Also the name of a road in the district.--#lmw51.5247788 -0.16831469999999626 North
Regent's ParkRegent’s Park, London, England | Regent’s Park | London | England | 51.5312705 -0.15696939999997994 | Now an upscale neighborhood in north London, Regent’s Park is named for the Royal Park it encompasses. The district was developed after 1811 when the Prince Regent commissioned John Nash to create a plan for the area. The Park was made part of Nash’s larger plans for nearby Regent Street and Carlton House Terrace. The Park’s residential terraces and Inner Circle villas were built during the early nineteenth century, and the Park was opened to the public in 1835. Also the site of the London Zoo (or Regent’s Zoo), created in 1828 for scientific study and opened to the public in 1847.--#ghb #lmw51.5312705 -0.15696939999997994
LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223