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Letter to B.R. HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, 31 October 1821.

Edited by Elisa E. Beshero-Bondar.

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First digital edition in TEI, date: 2 June 2013. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photos files: 1821-10-31-BRHaydon.pdf, 31October1821BRHaydon1.JPG, 31Oct1821BRHaydon4a.JPG, 31Oct1821BRHaydon3b.JPG, 31Oct1821BRHaydon2.jpg, 31Oct1821BRHaydon3.jpg, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central Library.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 ff.441 Horizon No.: 1361550

Folio sheet of paper folded in half to form four quarto pages, with correspondence on 1-3 and address leaf on page 4, then folded in thirds twice more and sealed for posting.Address leaf bearing the following postmarks: 1) black circular mileage stamp reading READING
[Gap: 1 chars, reason: illegible.]. 2) Red double circle Evening Duty stamp reading B
1 NO 1
1821
. 3) Sepia-inked oval Delivery stamp reading 10 o'Clock
* NO * 1 *
1821 F.Nn A large 7 denoting the fee for a single-sheet letter has been written in black ink by the postal service across the address leaf.A portion of page 3 has been torn away under the seal.Red wax seal, only partially visible in image 31Oct1821BRHaydon4a.JPG from 2007

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
October 31st 1821.Three Mile CrossMy dear Sir

The magnificent portion of bride cake arrived this morning & shall be distributed as you desire. Yes, we will set half the pretty girls in the parish dreaming on it--I wanted to make a bargain with one to whom I gave a bit just now that she should tell me her dream--but she says that would destroy the charm--If she told who the husband was to be she should never   get him. There was no saying a word after that you know. Bythebye nothing but the sort of sacred air that breathes around Bridecake--so that to steal that would be to invade the sweetest & holiest of our affections & sympathies--nothing but this fine & general feeling could have preserved your munificent present, & brought it safe to us. By some accident it was sent not by a ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 Coach but a NewburyNewbury, Berkshire, England | Newbury | Berkshire | England | 51.401409 -1.323113899999953 | Market town on the River Kennet in Berkshire. Horseracing took place between 1805 and 1811 at the Newbury Races, although the current racecourse did not come into existence until 1905.--#ebb #lmw51.401409 -1.323113899999953 one, & found its way to Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864, after being carried half way to NewburyNewbury, Berkshire, England | Newbury | Berkshire | England | 51.401409 -1.323113899999953 | Market town on the River Kennet in Berkshire. Horseracing took place between 1805 and 1811 at the Newbury Races, although the current racecourse did not come into existence until 1905.--#ebb #lmw51.401409 -1.323113899999953, through the intervention of all manner of men & women--Post boys--& Chambermaids & keepers of Turnpike gates. But every thing belonging to such a Weddingwedding of Mary Cawse Hyman and Benjamin Robert Haydon wedding - HaydonHymanWed - 1821-10-10 & such a Honeymoon as yours will turn out right depend on it. You see that your good luck extends even to your friends--& travels about with your bride-cake. Oh it will never forsake you! Never! I think that last honeymoon letter written whilst the fair Bride was sitting working & smiling at your side, was prettier even than the first. Did you read it to her as you wrote it? or page 2
shall I send her a copy? It was worthy even of that charming seal. How much you must both have felt in going into your painting room!-- Will the LazarusThe Resurrection of Lazarus, The Raising of Lazarus. Benjamin Robert Haydon.
Painting of enormous dimensions exhibited in 1823 at Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London. While on exhibit in 1823, the picture was seized from the gallery when Haydon was arrested for debt and imprisoned for two months.--#ebb
be finished against next season? If any thing could improve your genius it would be living in such a sunshine of love & beauty.

Miss JamesElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
is very anxious to have the pleasure of being known to Mrs. HaydonMary Hyman Haydon
The daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Cobley, the Rector of Dodbrooke, Kingsbridge, Devon, she was widowed with two children when she married Benjamin Robert Haydon on 10 October 1821.--#ghb
--She mentioned your note with great delight, & talked of calling--but was not I suppose certain of the time you would return to Lisson Grove. She is by this time back again at RichmondRichmond, London, England | Richmond upon Thames | Richmond | London | England | 51.46131099999999 -0.3037420000000566 | Richmond upon Thames, now a borough of London, formerly part of Surrey. The Hoflands lived there and Thomas Hofland painted views of the area.--#lmw51.46131099999999 -0.3037420000000566. I wished her very much to call on you Sunday or Monday that she might leave with you my poor TragedyFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. which I have should of all things have wished you to read--indeed I begged her to take the chance--I have such an opinion of your judgment. But it is now out of her hands. Only think of my shocking ill luck in having written on the same subject with Lord ByronGeorge Gordon Noel Byron, sixth Baron Byron | Born: 1788-01-22 in Holles Street, London. Died: 1824-04-19 in Missolonghi, Greece.
--
--The story of FoscariFrancesco Foscari
character in Foscari See also historical counterpart: son of Doge Foscari.--#ebb #ebb
--I am so distressed at the idea of a competition, not merely with his Lordship's talents, but with his great name, & the strange awe in which he holds people, & the terrible scoffs & sneers in which he indulges himselfGeorge Gordon Noel Byron, sixth Baron Byron | Born: 1788-01-22 in Holles Street, London. Died: 1824-04-19 in Missolonghi, Greece.
--
, that I have written to Mr. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
requesting him to consult another   friend on the propriety of entirely suppressing my play, which had gone to TownLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 to be presented to the ManagerWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
the very day that the subject of Lord Byron'sThe_Two_Foscari was announced.[1] Lord Byron's playThe_Two_Foscari was published by John Murray on 19 December 1821. Byron had composed it between 12 June and 9 July 1821 in RavennaRavenna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy | Ravenna | Emilia-Romagna | Italy | 44.4183598 12.20352939999998 | City in the province of Ravenna, Emilia-Romagna region on the north east coast of Italy on the Adriatic Sea. Lord Byron lived in Ravenna from 1819-1821, which was the site of his love affair with Teresa Guiccioli, and where he composed The Two Foscari in the summer of 1821.--#ebb44.4183598 12.20352939999998.—#ebb I rather think now that it will not be offered--that Mr. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
will suppress it--& I heartily wish he may. My poor TragedyFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. has been a work of great labour & is certainly complete enough in its own small way, but it is abundantly womanish & feeble, & does not at all adhere to the literal historic truth--which would be a great disadvantage in case the noble authorGeorge Gordon Noel Byron, sixth Baron Byron | Born: 1788-01-22 in Holles Street, London. Died: 1824-04-19 in Missolonghi, Greece.
--
page 3
should have done so, & have made the public familiar with the facts. I hope it will not be offered. What do you think of Lord Byron'sGeorge Gordon Noel Byron, sixth Baron Byron | Born: 1788-01-22 in Holles Street, London. Died: 1824-04-19 in Missolonghi, Greece.
--
dramatic power? ManfredManfred. George Gordon Noel Byron. was very fine certainly--perhaps the finest thing he ever did--& Marino FalieroMarino Faliero. George Gordon Noel Byron. certainly the worst. But FoscariFrancesco Foscari
character in Foscari See also historical counterpart: son of Doge Foscari.--#ebb #ebb
is a story of real human sympathy--not of factitious sentiment--He will certainly succeed in that. If this play be sent back to me unoffered I shall immediately begin another on some German story& shall take for the opening the exquisite first act of the OrestesOrestes. Euripides. -0408. of EuripidesEuripides | Born: -0480 in Salamís. Died: -0406 in Macedonia.
Ancient Greek playwright, considered together with Aeschylus and Sophocles as establishing the classical foundation of Western tragedy. Author of Ion (between 414 and 412 BC), on which Thomas Noon Talfourd later based his own play of the same title, as well as Orestes (408 B.C.), and Cyclops (date unknown), the only known complete example of a burlesque satyr play, translated into a satiric poem in 1819 by Percy Shelley . --#ebb #lmw
--which I saw acted so finely a fortnight ago, & which it is quite wonderful to think has never been transferred to the English stage. What astonishing people those Greek dramatists were! I am just now reading PotterRobert Potter | Born: 1771 in Podimore, Somerset. Died: 1804-08-09 in Lowestoft, Suffolk.
While a clergyman in Scarning, Norfolk, and the Master of Seckar’s School, he completed some of the earliest English translations, in blank verse, of Aeschylus in 1779, Euripides in 1783, and Sophocles in 1788. --#ghb
's AeschylusThe Tragedies of Aeschylus. Aeschylus.
Translation of Aeschylus’s plays read by Mitford.--#ebb
with the intensity of admiration with which you [Damage: agent: .] would look at the frescoes of Michael AngeloMichelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni | Born: 1475-03-06 in Caprese, Arezzo, Florence. Died: 1564-02-18 in Rome.
Renaissance artist famous for sculptures, such as "David" and "La Pieta", and frescoes, such as "The Last Judgement" and the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican. --#ghb
 & Happening to express something of this enthusiasm to a scholar of very great name he answered--"The PrometheusPrometheus Chained. Robert Potter. Robert Potter Potter Robert Rev. Potter Rev. Robert Potter .
One of R. Potter’s eighteenth-century translations of Aeschylus’s plays, from his volume The Tragedies of Aeschylus.--#ebb
? Yes the PrometheusPrometheus Chained. Robert Potter. Robert Potter Potter Robert Rev. Potter Rev. Robert Potter .
One of R. Potter’s eighteenth-century translations of Aeschylus’s plays, from his volume The Tragedies of Aeschylus.--#ebb
is rather pretty--prettyish-- one of the prettiest!" Now what business has this man Robert Potter | Born: 1771 in Podimore, Somerset. Died: 1804-08-09 in Lowestoft, Suffolk.
While a clergyman in Scarning, Norfolk, and the Master of Seckar’s School, he completed some of the earliest English translations, in blank verse, of Aeschylus in 1779, Euripides in 1783, and Sophocles in 1788. --#ghb
to know Greek! And what business have I to be intruding so long on you?--Good bye my dear Sir My FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
& MotherMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
join me in every kind remembrance & kinder wish to you & to Mrs HaydonMary Hyman Haydon
The daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Cobley, the Rector of Dodbrooke, Kingsbridge, Devon, she was widowed with two children when she married Benjamin Robert Haydon on 10 October 1821.--#ghb
.


Ever most sincerely your's
MR. Mitford.

Do not mention my FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. unless it should really be likely to come out of which you shall have the earliest notice. But of that there is very little chance. Once more God bless you. We have just been drinking your health & your dear MaryMary Hyman Haydon
The daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Cobley, the Rector of Dodbrooke, Kingsbridge, Devon, she was widowed with two children when she married Benjamin Robert Haydon on 10 October 1821.--#ghb
's. Again Good bye page 4

B. R. Haydon Esqre
St. John's Place
Lisson Grove North
Regent's Park
LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223