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Letter to T.N. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
[1822 May 19]

Edited by Lisa M. Wilson.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 24 May 2014. P5. . .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the The John Rylands University Library.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: The John Rylands University Library. Shelf mark: JRL English MS 665 no. 12 Coles no. 36

Folio sheet of paper folded in half to form four quarto pages, with correspondence on 1-3 and address leaf on page 4, then folded in thirds twice more and sealed for posting.Address leaf bearing no postmarksA small portion of page 1 has been torn away under the seal but it does not affect any text. Partial red wax seal, right side up.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.

propitiated our ManagerCharles Kemble--whose childishness is really in a man of his ripe years incredible. In the mean time would you advise me to try another Tragedy? If I could ever hope to do any thing really good--any thing worthy of Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
--But oh I never Shall!--Would you try JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. ? I don't think you like the subject, & I have many fears myself--& the dear DoctorRichard Valpy, Doctor of Divinity (DD), Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (FSA), or: Dr. Valpy | Born: 1754-12-07 in St. John’s, Jersey, Channel Islands. Died: 1836-03-28 in Reading, Berkshire, England.
Richard Valpy (the fourth of that name) was the eldest son of Richard Valpy [III] and Catherine Chevalier. He was born on December 7, 1754 at St. John’s, Jersey, Channel Islands. He was a friend and literary mentor to Mary Russell Mitford. He matriculated at Pembroke College, Oxford University on April 1, 1773, aged eighteen, as a Morley scholar. He received from Oxford a B.A. (1776), M.A. (1784), B.D. & D.D. (1792). He took orders in the Church of England in 1777. Richard Valpy served as Second Master at Bury School, Bury, Huntindonshire from 1771 to 1781, and was also collated to the rectory of Stradishall, Suffolk, in 1787. He became the Headmaster at Reading School, Reading, Berkshire, in 1781 and served until 1830, at which time he turned the Headmastership over to his youngest son Francis E. J. Valpy and continued in semi-retirement until his death in 1836. During his tenure as Headmaster of Reading Grammar School for boys over the course of fifty years, he expanded the boarding school and added new buildings. He is the author of numerous published works, including Greek and Latin textbooks, sermons, volumes of poetry, and adaptations of plays such as Shakespeare’s King John and Sheridan’s The Critic. His Elements of Greek Grammar, Elements of Latin Grammar,,Greek Delectus and Latin Delectus, printed and published by his son A. J. Valpy, were all much used as school texts throughout the nineteenth century. Valpy’s students performed his own adaptations of Greek, Latin, and English plays for the triennial visitations and the play receipts went to charitable organizations. Valpy enlisted Mitford to write reviews of the productions for the Reading Mercury. In 1803, his adaptation of Shakespeare’s King John was performed at Covent Garden Theatre. Richard Valpy was married twice and had twelve children, eleven of whom lived to adulthood. His first wife was Martha Cornelia de Cartaret; Richard and Martha were married about 1778 and they had one daughter, Martha Cartaretta Cornelia, born 1779. His first wife Martha died about 1780 and he married Mary Benwell of Caversham, Oxfordshire on May 30, 1782. Together they had six sons and five daughters and ten of their eleven children survived to adulthood. Richard Valpy and Mary Benwell’s sons were Richard Valpy (the fifth of that name), Abraham John Valpy, called John; Gabriel Valpy, Anthony Blagrove Valpy; and Francis Edward Jackson Valpy. His daughters were Mary Ann Catherine Valpy; Sarah Frances Valpy, called "Frances" or "Fanny"; Catherine Elizabeth Blanch Valpy; Penelope Arabella Valpy; and Elizabeth Charlotte Valpy, who died as an infant. Richard Valpy died on March 28, 1836 in Reading, Berkshire, and is buried in All Souls cemetery, Kensal Green, London. Dr. Valpy’s students placed a marble bust of him in St. Lawrence’s church, Reading, Berkshire, after his death. John Opie painted Dr. Valpy’s portrait. See . --#ebb #lmw
's admiration is seriously a bad sign--for you know he likes nothing but the melodramatic. Do you think that Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
who has already been so very very kind would take the trouble to read the first scenes   & say whether he thought it promising? I shall enclose it to you--but I depend on you not to mention it to him if he is at all likely to consider it as an intrusion--& mind (as Cobbett Member of Parliament for Oldham | Born: 1763-03-09 in Farnham, Surrey, England. Died: 1835-06-18 in Normandy, Surrey, England.
--
says) that I shall not take his advice to continue it--if such should be his advice--as at all pledging him to patronize the PlayJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. . I had much rather that you would would give me a final answer--make up my mind for me yourself--without troubling him--both because I have a great reluctance to take a liberty which he may well thinking unwarrantable with a gentleman whom I know only by his admirable talents & his admirable kindness--& because I still hold that old faith. Which you wot of in your infallibility--but on this subject you have always seemed almost as undecided as myself. Perhaps I ought to have taken your indecision as an absolute No, because you never fail to give encouragement where you can honestly--& yet you do pay me the Compliment of telling me the truth sometimes too. You need not take the trouble to retain the M.S. as I have another copy--I have marked the little bits of EuripidesEuripides | Born: -0480 in Salamís. Died: -0406 in Macedonia.
Ancient Greek playwright, considered together with Aeschylus and Sophocles as establishing the classical foundation of Western tragedy. Author of Ion (between 414 and 412 BC), on which Thomas Noon Talfourd later based his own play of the same title, as well as Orestes (408 B.C.), and Cyclops (date unknown), the only known complete example of a burlesque satyr play, translated into a satiric poem in 1819 by Percy Shelley . --#ebb #lmw
. The worst of JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. is that I don't see there can be any part at all for Mr. KembleCharles Kemble--for I suppose to think of his ever playing a father to Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
is quite out of the page 2
question--unless in his love of young characters he should take a fancy to "do" the little King. I wish with all my heart I had some high historical subject. Miss JamesElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
was recommending to me the story of the two Gaston de Foix Counts of OrtheGaston III count of Foix Fébus | Born: 1331. Died: 1391.
Son of Gaston II, he wrote a famous Book of the Hunt, or Livre de chasse .The medieval chronicler Froissart visited Gaston III’s court in 1388.--#ebb #lmw
Gaston II count of Foix
--#lmw
in FroissartJean Froissart, canon of Chimay, France, or: canon of Chimay, France | Born: 1337 in Valenciennes, County of Hainaut, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1405 in France.
--
--Do you remember it? I do not--but I have sent to her for it--If the subject be good--& unoccupied & there were a Father who might be made the real hero & a son who might pass for such it would just do, & I need not have troubled you with JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. . I am quite astonished to find myself planning new plays again after this disappointment. It is just like the poor silly birds who begin to build afresh the moment their nests have been taken. But really there is some little hope even in the caprice of these Managers--& I do not know what to do better--I wish I did.

During the negotiation about poor FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. I have had another affair with another Manager, & have fallen out & fallen   in with John Valpy'sAbraham John Valpy, or: Abraham John Valpy | Born: 1786-10-30 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-11-19 in St. John’s Wood Road, London, England.
Abraham John Valpy, called "John" or "A.J." Dr. Richard Valpy’s second son, Abraham John was born about 1786 and was baptized on October 30, 1786 in Reading, Berkshire. He was educated at Reading School and then matriculated at Pembroke College, Oxford on April 25, 1805; from that institution, he received his B.A. (1809) and M.A. (1811) and was appointed a Fellow for a short time in 1811. According to the DNB, he was "bound apprentice to a freeman of London, Humphrey Gregory Pridden," a printer. He was admitted a Liveryman of the Stationer’s Company in London in 1807. He worked as a printer-publisher and editor, and owned premises in London at 21 Tooke’s Court, Cursitor Street (1811) and later at Red Lion Court, Fleet Street (1821). He published numerous works of ancient and modern literature, and was the printer and publisher of periodical The Museum (1822-1825). He worked with E.H. Barker of Thetford, George Burges, George Dyer, and T.S. Hughes. He retired from the publishing industry in 1837. On February 25, 1813 he married Harriet Wylde at Burrington, Somerset. John and Harriet Wylde lived in greater London and died without issue. John died on November 19, 1854 at St. John’s Wood Road, London, and is buried at All Soul’s, Kensal Green, London. --#lmw #ebb
Mr. BayleyPeter Bayley | Born: 1778. Died: 1823-01-25 in London, England.
Editor of the The Museum, married to the Mrs. Bayley mentioned in Mitford’s letter to Talfourd of 11 May 1825 . Source: DNB. --#ebb #lmw
--the Editor of the MuseumThe Museum; or Record of Literature, Fine Arts, Antiquities, the Drama, &c.. 1822-04-27.
a weekly periodical edited by Peter Bayley and printed by John Valpy.--#lmw
. It is the worst consequence of this sort of anxiety--& I suppose of all anxiety--that it makes one nervous as it is called--that is to say unquiet & irritable--So that I have lost my only good gift the serenity of a naturally calm & cheerful temper, & things fret me now which two years ago would only have amused me. In this mood I was so affronted at a certainly impertinent notice in No. 1 of the MuseumThe Museum; or Record of Literature, Fine Arts, Antiquities, the Drama, &c.. 1822-04-27.
a weekly periodical edited by Peter Bayley and printed by John Valpy.--#lmw
that I wrote to John ValpyAbraham John Valpy, or: Abraham John Valpy | Born: 1786-10-30 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-11-19 in St. John’s Wood Road, London, England.
Abraham John Valpy, called "John" or "A.J." Dr. Richard Valpy’s second son, Abraham John was born about 1786 and was baptized on October 30, 1786 in Reading, Berkshire. He was educated at Reading School and then matriculated at Pembroke College, Oxford on April 25, 1805; from that institution, he received his B.A. (1809) and M.A. (1811) and was appointed a Fellow for a short time in 1811. According to the DNB, he was "bound apprentice to a freeman of London, Humphrey Gregory Pridden," a printer. He was admitted a Liveryman of the Stationer’s Company in London in 1807. He worked as a printer-publisher and editor, and owned premises in London at 21 Tooke’s Court, Cursitor Street (1811) and later at Red Lion Court, Fleet Street (1821). He published numerous works of ancient and modern literature, and was the printer and publisher of periodical The Museum (1822-1825). He worked with E.H. Barker of Thetford, George Burges, George Dyer, and T.S. Hughes. He retired from the publishing industry in 1837. On February 25, 1813 he married Harriet Wylde at Burrington, Somerset. John and Harriet Wylde lived in greater London and died without issue. John died on November 19, 1854 at St. John’s Wood Road, London, and is buried at All Soul’s, Kensal Green, London. --#lmw #ebb
& desired him to return the three Articles which I had sent him. Instead of doing so JohnAbraham John Valpy, or: Abraham John Valpy | Born: 1786-10-30 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-11-19 in St. John’s Wood Road, London, England.
Abraham John Valpy, called "John" or "A.J." Dr. Richard Valpy’s second son, Abraham John was born about 1786 and was baptized on October 30, 1786 in Reading, Berkshire. He was educated at Reading School and then matriculated at Pembroke College, Oxford on April 25, 1805; from that institution, he received his B.A. (1809) and M.A. (1811) and was appointed a Fellow for a short time in 1811. According to the DNB, he was "bound apprentice to a freeman of London, Humphrey Gregory Pridden," a printer. He was admitted a Liveryman of the Stationer’s Company in London in 1807. He worked as a printer-publisher and editor, and owned premises in London at 21 Tooke’s Court, Cursitor Street (1811) and later at Red Lion Court, Fleet Street (1821). He published numerous works of ancient and modern literature, and was the printer and publisher of periodical The Museum (1822-1825). He worked with E.H. Barker of Thetford, George Burges, George Dyer, and T.S. Hughes. He retired from the publishing industry in 1837. On February 25, 1813 he married Harriet Wylde at Burrington, Somerset. John and Harriet Wylde lived in greater London and died without issue. John died on November 19, 1854 at St. John’s Wood Road, London, and is buried at All Soul’s, Kensal Green, London. --#lmw #ebb
wrote back a letter so very kind & friendly that it was quite irresistible & with it came an epistle from the EditorPeter Bayley | Born: 1778. Died: 1823-01-25 in London, England.
Editor of the The Museum, married to the Mrs. Bayley mentioned in Mitford’s letter to Talfourd of 11 May 1825 . Source: DNB. --#ebb #lmw
in which amidst a shower of compliments he reiterates his original charge of imitation & conjured me not to waste my powers by catching up page 2
the peculiarities of a style &c. &c. Now I am so guiltless of intentional imitation that I did not even guess what poet he meant till a letter from Miss Nooth,Charlotte Nooth | Born: 1780. Died: .
A friend of Dr. Richard Valpy, who resided at Kew, Surrey, but was often in Paris. She wrote a poem to Dr. Valpy, published volumes of poetry in 1815 & 1816, including a verse tragedy. --#scw #lmw
who was I suppose behind the scenes, explained the mystery by advising me not "to pervert my dramatic Style by the example of Barry CornwallBryan Waller Procter, or: Barry Cornwall | Born: 1787-11-21 in Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Died: 1874-10-05 in London, England.
A friend of Charles Lamb, Procter contributed poetry to the Naturalist’s Calendar and later contributed to the edition of Finden’s Tableaux edited by Mitford. He wrote a biography of Edmund Kean in 1835 and a biography of Lamb in 1866. --#lmw
--not to be pretty & simple but pointed & polished & concise" & so on. You know her notions on poetry & the drama--& by the bye I don't believe that she ever   read a line of Barry CornwallBryan Waller Procter, or: Barry Cornwall | Born: 1787-11-21 in Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Died: 1874-10-05 in London, England.
A friend of Charles Lamb, Procter contributed poetry to the Naturalist’s Calendar and later contributed to the edition of Finden’s Tableaux edited by Mitford. He wrote a biography of Edmund Kean in 1835 and a biography of Lamb in 1866. --#lmw
s & I am pretty sure that she has never seen any dramatic poetry of mine. But I don't see why Mr. BayleyPeter Bayley | Born: 1778. Died: 1823-01-25 in London, England.
Editor of the The Museum, married to the Mrs. Bayley mentioned in Mitford’s letter to Talfourd of 11 May 1825 . Source: DNB. --#ebb #lmw
should fancy an imitation if none existed & I have mentioned the circumstance in order to implore you to tell me frankly if there is in my Dramatic ScenesDramatic Scenes, Sonnets, and Other Poems. . Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1827. any culpable "catching at the peculiarities of Mr. ProctorBryan Waller Procter, or: Barry Cornwall | Born: 1787-11-21 in Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Died: 1874-10-05 in London, England.
A friend of Charles Lamb, Procter contributed poetry to the Naturalist’s Calendar and later contributed to the edition of Finden’s Tableaux edited by Mitford. He wrote a biography of Edmund Kean in 1835 and a biography of Lamb in 1866. --#lmw
's style." There is a resemblance in form certainly--& though I have never seen his delightful work since I read it very hastily & admired it very much soon after its [Gap: 1 word, reason: torn.][publication] yet I am aware that certain forms of dialogue may [Gap: 2 word, reason: torn.][have fixed] themselves in my mind & may have been unconsciously transferred to my own pages. Do tell me if it is so.--I have just heard of a worse affair in these MuseumThe Museum; or Record of Literature, Fine Arts, Antiquities, the Drama, &c.. 1822-04-27.
a weekly periodical edited by Peter Bayley and printed by John Valpy.--#lmw
Managers than the notice.--They have actually lost my articles, & want to throw the blame on the poor dear DoctorRichard Valpy, Doctor of Divinity (DD), Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (FSA), or: Dr. Valpy | Born: 1754-12-07 in St. John’s, Jersey, Channel Islands. Died: 1836-03-28 in Reading, Berkshire, England.
Richard Valpy (the fourth of that name) was the eldest son of Richard Valpy [III] and Catherine Chevalier. He was born on December 7, 1754 at St. John’s, Jersey, Channel Islands. He was a friend and literary mentor to Mary Russell Mitford. He matriculated at Pembroke College, Oxford University on April 1, 1773, aged eighteen, as a Morley scholar. He received from Oxford a B.A. (1776), M.A. (1784), B.D. & D.D. (1792). He took orders in the Church of England in 1777. Richard Valpy served as Second Master at Bury School, Bury, Huntindonshire from 1771 to 1781, and was also collated to the rectory of Stradishall, Suffolk, in 1787. He became the Headmaster at Reading School, Reading, Berkshire, in 1781 and served until 1830, at which time he turned the Headmastership over to his youngest son Francis E. J. Valpy and continued in semi-retirement until his death in 1836. During his tenure as Headmaster of Reading Grammar School for boys over the course of fifty years, he expanded the boarding school and added new buildings. He is the author of numerous published works, including Greek and Latin textbooks, sermons, volumes of poetry, and adaptations of plays such as Shakespeare’s King John and Sheridan’s The Critic. His Elements of Greek Grammar, Elements of Latin Grammar,,Greek Delectus and Latin Delectus, printed and published by his son A. J. Valpy, were all much used as school texts throughout the nineteenth century. Valpy’s students performed his own adaptations of Greek, Latin, and English plays for the triennial visitations and the play receipts went to charitable organizations. Valpy enlisted Mitford to write reviews of the productions for the Reading Mercury. In 1803, his adaptation of Shakespeare’s King John was performed at Covent Garden Theatre. Richard Valpy was married twice and had twelve children, eleven of whom lived to adulthood. His first wife was Martha Cornelia de Cartaret; Richard and Martha were married about 1778 and they had one daughter, Martha Cartaretta Cornelia, born 1779. His first wife Martha died about 1780 and he married Mary Benwell of Caversham, Oxfordshire on May 30, 1782. Together they had six sons and five daughters and ten of their eleven children survived to adulthood. Richard Valpy and Mary Benwell’s sons were Richard Valpy (the fifth of that name), Abraham John Valpy, called John; Gabriel Valpy, Anthony Blagrove Valpy; and Francis Edward Jackson Valpy. His daughters were Mary Ann Catherine Valpy; Sarah Frances Valpy, called "Frances" or "Fanny"; Catherine Elizabeth Blanch Valpy; Penelope Arabella Valpy; and Elizabeth Charlotte Valpy, who died as an infant. Richard Valpy died on March 28, 1836 in Reading, Berkshire, and is buried in All Souls cemetery, Kensal Green, London. Dr. Valpy’s students placed a marble bust of him in St. Lawrence’s church, Reading, Berkshire, after his death. John Opie painted Dr. Valpy’s portrait. See . --#ebb #lmw
whom I believe to be as innocent in the matter as a Dove. Well. PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
will take them in hand--I have not made him promise not to scold them--& Mr. BayleyPeter Bayley | Born: 1778. Died: 1823-01-25 in London, England.
Editor of the The Museum, married to the Mrs. Bayley mentioned in Mitford’s letter to Talfourd of 11 May 1825 . Source: DNB. --#ebb #lmw
is likely enough to come in for a small portion of the hoarded wrath excited by  Mr. his friend Mr. Kemble.Charles Kemble--Perhaps his is one of the Rotation Tragedies--John ValpyAbraham John Valpy, or: Abraham John Valpy | Born: 1786-10-30 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-11-19 in St. John’s Wood Road, London, England.
Abraham John Valpy, called "John" or "A.J." Dr. Richard Valpy’s second son, Abraham John was born about 1786 and was baptized on October 30, 1786 in Reading, Berkshire. He was educated at Reading School and then matriculated at Pembroke College, Oxford on April 25, 1805; from that institution, he received his B.A. (1809) and M.A. (1811) and was appointed a Fellow for a short time in 1811. According to the DNB, he was "bound apprentice to a freeman of London, Humphrey Gregory Pridden," a printer. He was admitted a Liveryman of the Stationer’s Company in London in 1807. He worked as a printer-publisher and editor, and owned premises in London at 21 Tooke’s Court, Cursitor Street (1811) and later at Red Lion Court, Fleet Street (1821). He published numerous works of ancient and modern literature, and was the printer and publisher of periodical The Museum (1822-1825). He worked with E.H. Barker of Thetford, George Burges, George Dyer, and T.S. Hughes. He retired from the publishing industry in 1837. On February 25, 1813 he married Harriet Wylde at Burrington, Somerset. John and Harriet Wylde lived in greater London and died without issue. John died on November 19, 1854 at St. John’s Wood Road, London, and is buried at All Soul’s, Kensal Green, London. --#lmw #ebb
said he had one in the Theatre--at least he said the EditorPeter Bayley | Born: 1778. Died: 1823-01-25 in London, England.
Editor of the The Museum, married to the Mrs. Bayley mentioned in Mitford’s letter to Talfourd of 11 May 1825 . Source: DNB. --#ebb #lmw
had one--whom we then took forMr. SoaneGeorge Soane
Coles posits George Soane, "(1790-1860), miscellaneous writer" (Coles p. 172, note 14)--#lmw
.--I am quite ashamed of this interminable letter--I hope PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
will find you quite recovered.--Adieu my dear & kind friendThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
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I cannot tell you with how much gratitude I am always your's
M.R. MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb


Do you think there would be any use in shewing the altered FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. to Mr. MilmanHenry Hart Milman
--#lmw
--It is much better than the original play certainly (thanks to you!)--& his good word would go far with the Kemble'sthe Kembles--but then I suppose he is pledged to the Sicilian Vesper TragedyThe Vespers of Palermo: A Tragedy in Five Acts. Felicia Hemans. 1823. --What do you think--I have never yet had the heart to write out the alterations--but that would soon be done.

You will tell PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
whether Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
is really coming & when.--& whether you come too--Oh do pray.--And whether you are really & truly quite quite well again--Once more Good bye.--I am ashamed of this sad scrawl.

To T. N. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
Esqre.