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Letter to Benjamin Robert HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, June 13, 1822date

Edited by .

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 8 August 2017. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: 13June1822BRHaydon1a#.JPG, 13June1822BRHaydon1b#.JPG, 13June1822BRHaydon2a#.JPG, 13June1822BRHaydon2b#.JPG, 13June1822BRHaydon3a#.JPG, 13June1822BRHaydon3b#.JPG, 13June1822BRHaydon4a#.JPG, 13June1822BRHaydon4b#.JPG, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 453

One sheet of folio paper folded into four writing surfaces (each surface photographed separately). The letter begins on the top of the first page, and continues from top to bottom of pages two through four. The text of the letter on the fourth page is split after the fifth line, allowing space for the address leaf. The address leaf is centered on the page, and oriented perpendicularly to the text. The paper is folded into thirds two additional times (forming nine rectangular regions distinguished by creases in the paper) for sealing and posting. The letter bears three distinct postmarks: 1) one circluar, black mileage stamp (left of the address leaf) reading READING
[JU 13]
[1822]
[42] [1] This stamp signifies that the letter was deposited at the local post office on June 13, 1822, and that the distance between ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 and LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 is 42 miles.—#ms 2) one elliptical, red delivery stamp (left of the address leaf) reading 10 o'Clock
* JU * 18 *
1822 F.N.n[2] The abbreviation, "F.N.n," stands for "Forenoon." The order of the date (Month, Day) and the single rim surrounding the text on the stamp indicate that the letter was delivered to the Chief Postal Office.—#ms 3) one circular, black franking stamp (partially covering the address line) reading FREE
[18 JUNE]
1822 Pages three and four of the letter exhibit a small hole in the paper from removal of the wax seal. Small, circular regions of sepia staining are present throughout the document (but not inhibitive of text legibility). [3] The size and scattered placement of these stains could indicate randomized water damage from rainfall.—#ms Red wax seal, with partial adherence to the third and fourth page surfaces. There is not enough of the wax remaining on the letter to distinguish what seal MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
used.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 June 13th 1822.

A thousand thanks, my dear Sir, for your kind & delightful letter. I felt that I had not deserved it--for I must have appeared sadly inattentive & undeserving by being three days in town without waiting on Mrs. HaydonMary Hyman Haydon
The daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Cobley, the Rector of Dodbrooke, Kingsbridge, Devon, she was widowed with two children when she married Benjamin Robert Haydon on 10 October 1821.--#ghb
--But you know how it happened--On the Friday I was not [sure] that you had not moved in the first place when Pope set out in quest of you, & in the second it was necessary that I should keep myself perfectly quiet to attend an appointment with Mr. C KembleCharles Kemble at two oclocko'clock--Saturday you were as I knew [out]--Sunday as I knew coming--besides which I was actually confined to the houseThreeMileCross
Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb
on both of those days from the necessity of not missing a friend whom I was obliged to see after my interview with the ManagerWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
to make sure that I might not by altering to please him displease Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
--& on Sunday Evening I was so unwell as to be obliged to make [up] my friend to disappoint myself by breaking my appointment for Monday morning--& it was very well I did so--for   when the morning came I was fit for nothing but to be [backed] off home. In fact a country lady who lives almost literally in the open air, in green fields or flowery gardens, is terribly out of her element in LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 in hot weather--All the time that I was in [Norton] Street I felt just as I suppose that Patriarchal Larch --[tell] of hotland must have done, when crammed into a garden hot & coddled amongst the myrtles & orange trees of the page 2
Duke of [AtholeAtholl]'s [4] Mitford does not make a direct indication as to which Duke of Atholl she is referencing; it is assumed that she is speaking of the Duke living at the time of writing.—#ms greenhouse [5] MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
is likely comparing the European larch to smaller trees to emphasize feeling out of place in the hot cityscape of LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223.—#ms
. But I am so sorry not to have seen the two [charms] of Lisson GroveLisson Grove, Westminster, London, England | Lisson Grove | Westminster | London | England | 51.5247788 -0.16831469999999626 | District in the City of Westminster, London, west of Regent’s Park. Student artists and painters from the Royal Academy lived in this district in the early nineteenth century, including William Blake, Richard Cosway, and Benjamin Robert Haydon. Also the name of a road in the district.--#lmw51.5247788 -0.16831469999999626--The furniture--& its fair [Inspirer]. Well I will hope that the day may come when I shall be so fortunate as to make acquaintance with both--especially the latter. I cannot tell you, my dear Mr. Haydon, with what pleasure & interest I read your fresh & glowing account of your mutual happiness--No wonder that you fear society--or rather that you fear that fine company which does not deserve the name of society, & which seems to me good for nothing but to spoil the mind, the manners, the very beauty of women, & to turn them into the sort of fine [6] There is a small tear in the paper here that could be mistaken for a comma.—#ms ladies which you have described so well in your portrait of the wife of the Portrait Painter --poor man. How you must have pitied him! For my [part] I think that except here & there some "creature of poetry" [7] It is unclear if MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
is making a specific reference here. However, because she was well aquainted with the writings of John Keats'John Keats | Born: 1795-10-31 in Moorgate, London. Died: 1821-02-23 in Rome. , MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
could be referencing the phrase, "fair creature of an hour," from line nine of his poem, "When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be."—#ms
just as you have been happy enough to meet with & to deserve, Ladies are nowadays all alike--all accomplished--all literary--all artificial--with heads divided between Quadrilles [8] Resembling American square dancing, the quadrille was a popularized dance in Europe during the 18th and 19th centuries in which four couples assembled in a square formation and took turns dancing.—#ms & criticism--If [routs] [&] reviews had been extant in Shakespeare'sWilliam Shakespeare | Born: 1564-04 in Stratford upon Avon. Died: 1616-04-23 in Stratford upon Avon.
English author and actor (1564-1616) --#lmw
time we should not have had the ViolasViola
Character in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night.--#lmw
& the DesdemonasDesdemona
character in Othello --#lmw
.--You see I cannot help coming back to the Drama. If Miss JamesElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
had the pleasure of seeing you she probably told you that "Foscari"Foscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. was accepted--& that Mr. Charles KembleCharles Kemble, whose conduct has really been very kind, promises certainly to bring it out next season--but there must be another alteration in the catastrophe--which as well as the delay exceedingly page 3
provokes my still kinder, though unknown, friend Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
. I must alter it however as well as I can--A manager has certainly a right to require that--& I am sure from the extreme frankness & friendliness of Mr. C. Kemble'sCharles Kemble manner that he is really afraid of the present catastrophe--But you may imagine what a job it will be when [I tell] you, that this fifth Act has already been remodelled 6 times! The DogeDoge Foscari
character in Mitford’s play Foscari See also historical counterpart: Doge Foscari.--#ebb
has died of joy--& his sonFrancesco Foscari
character in Foscari See also historical counterpart: son of Doge Foscari.--#ebb #ebb
has died of joy--there have been two poisonings (the one by the bye worse than the other--I am a sad hand at a fatal draughtdraft)--two assissinations--& how I am going to kill my heroFrancesco Foscari
character in Foscari See also historical counterpart: son of Doge Foscari.--#ebb #ebb
by fair fighting. This, to compare a very small thing with a very great one, is almost like the alterations in the Head of Christ in your great Picture--at [Damage: 1 char, agent: tear.]east it had the same uncomfortable & [9] This ampersand is partially covered by red wax from the letter's seal.—#ms unsettling effect on my mind, that the  altering your sublime conception must have had on your[']syours[10] Ink from the delivery stamp has bled through the page at this location in the letter, but does not affect the legibility of either the stamp text or letter content.—#ms. I have too a lurking fear that, not from any fault of the ManagerWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
, but from an unlucky confluence of better Plays , my poor FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. may never be acted at all. Sir Walter ScottWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
is going to take the field--& worse still--no not worse--better for literature & the Drama & the CountryEngland
Country in the British Isles. Borders Scotland and Wales. London is the capital city, and is situated on the River Thames.--#bas
(God defend me from Envy!)--better still Mr. KnowlesJames Sheridan Knowles
Irish author and actor (1784-1862). Born Cork, Ireland; Died Torquay, England. Known as "Sheridan" Knowles. Friend of Hazlitt, Lamb, and Coleridge. His father James Knowles was the cousin of Richard Brinsley Sheridan. Wrote William Tell (1825) for Macready. Also wrote The Hunchback (Covent Garden, 1832). Later became a Baptist preacher. --#lmw
has another Play [11] If she is speaking about a specific play, Mitford could be referencing Sheridan'sJames Sheridan Knowles
Irish author and actor (1784-1862). Born Cork, Ireland; Died Torquay, England. Known as "Sheridan" Knowles. Friend of Hazlitt, Lamb, and Coleridge. His father James Knowles was the cousin of Richard Brinsley Sheridan. Wrote William Tell (1825) for Macready. Also wrote The Hunchback (Covent Garden, 1832). Later became a Baptist preacher. --#lmw
William Tell, completed in 1825.—#ms
if not two to send in--& what could stand against another VirginiusVirginius. Sheridan Knowles. ? Mr. KembleCharles Kemble promises through all--& I should believe--only that it is so difficult to replant Hope when it has once been [booted] out--Nevertheless I shall write on, & attempt higher things than this pretty but too womanish Tragedy. page 4
Pray forgive me for writing so much on so unworthy a subject--but I am so interested in all that concerns you that I cannot help flattering myself that you in some small degree return the compliment--& this is not an affair of vanity--but of comfort--almost of [12] The content of the letter is written around the Address Leaf information, broken at this point in Mitford'sMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
message.—#ms
subsistence. Oh what a terrible thing it is to have only the powerless will to be offense to those who are so very very dear!--God bless you my dear friendBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
!--My [father & mother] join in all that is kindest to you & to Mrs. HaydonMary Hyman Haydon
The daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Cobley, the Rector of Dodbrooke, Kingsbridge, Devon, she was widowed with two children when she married Benjamin Robert Haydon on 10 October 1821.--#ghb
--whom I cannot think of as a stranger--


Ever most sincerely yours MR MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb

ReadingJune  sixtseventeen 1822
B.R. Haydon [Esqre]Benjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
[13] The word following Haydon'sBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
name is obscured by the postmark stamp—#ms

St Johns PlaceSt. John’s Place, Lisson Grove, Regent’s Park, London, England | Lisson Grove | Regent’s Park | London | England | 51.5361, -0.1751 | St. John’s Wood | Occasional residence from 1817 onward of Benjamin Robert Haydon in Lisson Grove, Regent’s Park, London. Site of Haydon’s famous dinner gathering with guests William Wordsworth, John Keats, Charles Lamb, Thomas Monkhouse, and Joseph Ritchie on 28 December 1817. Haydon’s enormous painting, Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem hung in Haydon’s painting room as background.--#ghb #ebb51.5361, -0.1751
Lisson GroveLisson Grove, Westminster, London, England | Lisson Grove | Westminster | London | England | 51.5247788 -0.16831469999999626 | District in the City of Westminster, London, west of Regent’s Park. Student artists and painters from the Royal Academy lived in this district in the early nineteenth century, including William Blake, Richard Cosway, and Benjamin Robert Haydon. Also the name of a road in the district.--#lmw51.5247788 -0.16831469999999626
RegentsRegent's [Park]Regent’s Park, London, England | Regent’s Park | London | England | 51.5312705 -0.15696939999997994 | Now an upscale neighborhood in north London, Regent’s Park is named for the Royal Park it encompasses. The district was developed after 1811 when the Prince Regent commissioned John Nash to create a plan for the area. The Park was made part of Nash’s larger plans for nearby Regent Street and Carlton House Terrace. The Park’s residential terraces and Inner Circle villas were built during the early nineteenth century, and the Park was opened to the public in 1835. Also the site of the London Zoo (or Regent’s Zoo), created in 1828 for scientific study and opened to the public in 1847.--#ghb #lmw51.5312705 -0.15696939999997994
LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223
J.B. MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
[14] The name of John Berkeley MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
, who franked some of Mitford'sMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
letters, is left-justified and written adjacent to Haydon'sBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
address on the Address Leaf.—#ms