Maintained by: Elisa E. Beshero-Bondar (ebb8 at pitt.edu) Creative Commons LicenseLast modified: 2018-08-17T03:48:53.167-04:00

Our default is the Diplomatic view.
Click to toggle the Normalized view
(shows conventional spellings;
hides pagebreaks, insertion marks, and deletions):

Letter to B.R. HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, 1823 March 25

Edited by Elizabeth RaisanenBrooke A. Stewart.

Sponsored by:

Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: 20March1823BRHaydon4b.JPG, 20March1823BRHaydon4a.JPG, 20March1823BRHaydon3b.JPG, 20March1823BRHaydon3a.JPG, 20March1823BRHaydon2b.JPG, 20March1823BRHaydon1b.JPG, 20March1823BRHaydon2a.JPG, 20March1823BRHaydon1a.JPG, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2014.

Reproduced by courtesy of the The Reading Central Library.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: The Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 466

One quarto sheet of paper folded in half to form two octavo pages, which comprise three pages of the letter. The address appears on the other side. There are two holes on page two, and one of them obscures the word; there are one hole on page three that obscures the word On the up-right corner of the third page of the letter, the red wax obscures the word. Address leaf bearing the following postmarks: 1)Sepia-inked oval Delivery stamp reading EVEN
26*MR
1823 A large 3 has been written in black ink on the address leaf, denoting a charge of 3d. Red wax seal,complete, adhered to address leaf.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded. Checked for completion. Proofed against ms. Header information needs to be revised/added.
page 1
B.R. Haydon EBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 Tuesday[1] 4
20 March 1823—#pencil
[2] Having checked a perpetual calendar, we found that the date recorded by the cataloguer of 20 March 1823 was a Thursday. The postmark clearly reads 26 MR, a Wednesday. By consulting the theatre reviews referenced in this letter, The John Bull and The Examiner, we have concluded that this letter was written on 25 March 1823. The first John Bull article to mention Julian was published on 24 March 1823, and The Examiner on 23 March 1823, making it impossible for the letter to be written on 20 March 1823.—#bas #ebb My dear Sir

I am sending a frank to Mrs. HoflandBarbara Wreaks Hofland | Born: 1770 in Yorkshire. Died: 1844-11-04 in Richmond-on-Thames.
Novelist and writer of children’s books popular in England and America, Barbara Hofland was a native of Sheffield, Yorkshire, where she published poems from July 1794 in the local newspaper, The Sheffield Iris. Her first marriage to Thomas Bradshawe Hoole left her widowed and in poverty, raising a son, Frederic, on her own, and she supported herself by publishing poems and children’s books, and by running a girl’s school in Harrogate. second marriage was to the artist Thomas Christopher Hofland. (Source: ODNB)--#ebb
& I cannot help enclosing a note to you to ask if the report in the papers be true that LazarusThe Resurrection of Lazarus, The Raising of Lazarus. Benjamin Robert Haydon.
Painting of enormous dimensions exhibited in 1823 at Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London. While on exhibit in 1823, the picture was seized from the gallery when Haydon was arrested for debt and imprisoned for two months.--#ebb
is sold? I hope it is so--I hope so so earnestly that I can hardly believe it.

Did I tell you that I had had an application from Mr. EllistonRobert William Elliston | Born: 1774-04-07 in London, United Kingdom. Died: 1831-07-07 in London, United Kingdom.
Ran away from home to become an actor. Over his career he would eventually act at Drury Lane, gaining enough money to start his own theater ventures as a theatre manager. Elliston managed Drury Lane and other theaters, and he is mentioned in the writings of Leigh Hunt, Byron, and Macready.The later years leading up to his death involved periods of illness, bankruptcy, and chronic alcoholism --#jap #jmh #lmw
for FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. ? which under Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
's advice I declined. But the application was flattering--& I trust that under all the disadvantage of the execrable acting a great impression has been made by JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. --to have withstood such acting for four nights is something--Is it not?--& if we go on in the Easter week I shall page 2
have hopes--& if we do not I shall not despond--for much has been done of that I am confident. The article in the John BullJohn Bull.
Presumably the popular periodical founded in 1820.--#err
was what I expected--but that in The ExaminerThe Examiner, A Sunday paper, on politics, domestic economy, and theatricals. 1808-1886.
Weekly periodical launched by editor Leigh Hunt and his brother, the printer John Hunt. Mitford’s correspondence demonstrates that her household subscribed or regularly had access to The Examiner and The London Magazine.--#ebb
was worse in my mind--Could not you do any thing to procure a short & more favorable notice against next Sunday? I ask you just as I would ask a brother--I wish with all my heart that any one would write an exposure of that slang of criticism "Melodramatic"--I am sure, as Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
says, that if any one of the Greek Dramas or ^ even ShakespeareWilliam Shakespeare | Born: 1564-04 in Stratford upon Avon. Died: 1616-04-23 in Stratford upon Avon.
English author and actor (1564-1616) --#lmw
's stronger plays, or any thing that is effective were to be produced now, it would be assailed by that word.--By the way Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
and his Sister have page 3
been kind to me beyond all k[Gap: 3 chars, reason: torn.][ind]ness. They are delightful people.

Will you say every thing for me to your lovely wife--& my kind friends Mr. BewickWilliam Bewick | Born: 1795-10-20 in Danlington, Durham, England. Died: 1866-06-08 in Haughton-le-Skerne, Durham, England.
Pupil of Benjamin Robert Haydon for about three years and attended the Royal Academy. Bewick was not a member of the family of Thomas Bewick the illustrator-engraver. --#xjw #lmw
& Mr. ChatfieldEdward Chatfield | Born: 1802. Died: 1839-01-22 in 66 Judd Street, Brunswick Square, London, England.
Chatfield was a pupil of Haydonat the same time as William Bewick When Haydon was arrested for debt in June 1823, Chatfield was among those who had put their names to bills for him; reportedly, he was able to pay the debt and did not blame Haydon, who had not accepted any payment for his teaching. Source: DNB. --#xjw #lmw
? Shall I send you some orders for the Fifth night?[3] Mitford is probably referring to the fifth night of production of her play, Julian, at Covent GardenTheatre Royal, Covent Garden, London, England | Covent Garden Theatre | Covent Garden | Westminster | London | England | 51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585 | A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the royal "patent theaters." The first theater on this site was opened in 1732 by John Rich, renovated by architect Henry Holland in 1792, and destroyed by fire on 20 Sept. 1808. The second theater, designed by Robert Smirke, opened on 18 Sept. 1809 and was managed by John Phillip Kemble. Because of rent increases by the Duke of Bedford, the landowner, J.P. Kemble increased ticket prices. This led to the "old price (or O.P.) riots" and the eventual lowering of ticket prices, although the proprietors proved they would lose money at those prices. The second theater was destroyed by fire on 5 March 1856. The third theater, designed by Edward Middleton Barry, opened in 1858 and remains at the center of today’s theater complex. The theater became the Royal Opera House in 1892 and the building was renovated and expanded in the 1980s and 1990s. --#lmw51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585. An article in the Morning Post lists the fifth night of production as 02 April 1823.—#bas--And pray try what you can do with The ExaminerThe Examiner, A Sunday paper, on politics, domestic economy, and theatricals. 1808-1886.
Weekly periodical launched by editor Leigh Hunt and his brother, the printer John Hunt. Mitford’s correspondence demonstrates that her household subscribed or regularly had access to The Examiner and The London Magazine.--#ebb
.--Ever my dear Sir


Most gratefully your'syours
Mary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
M. R. Mitford.

To B. R. Haydon. EsqreBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw

St John's Place St. John’s Place, Lisson Grove, Regent’s Park, London, England | Lisson Grove | Regent’s Park | London | England | 51.5361, -0.1751 | St. John’s Wood | Occasional residence from 1817 onward of Benjamin Robert Haydon in Lisson Grove, Regent’s Park, London. Site of Haydon’s famous dinner gathering with guests William Wordsworth, John Keats, Charles Lamb, Thomas Monkhouse, and Joseph Ritchie on 28 December 1817. Haydon’s enormous painting, Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem hung in Haydon’s painting room as background.--#ghb #ebb51.5361, -0.1751
Lisson Grove Lisson Grove, Westminster, London, England | Lisson Grove | Westminster | London | England | 51.5247788 -0.16831469999999626 | District in the City of Westminster, London, west of Regent’s Park. Student artists and painters from the Royal Academy lived in this district in the early nineteenth century, including William Blake, Richard Cosway, and Benjamin Robert Haydon. Also the name of a road in the district.--#lmw51.5247788 -0.16831469999999626North
Regent's ParkRegent’s Park, London, England | Regent’s Park | London | England | 51.5312705 -0.15696939999997994 | Now an upscale neighborhood in north London, Regent’s Park is named for the Royal Park it encompasses. The district was developed after 1811 when the Prince Regent commissioned John Nash to create a plan for the area. The Park was made part of Nash’s larger plans for nearby Regent Street and Carlton House Terrace. The Park’s residential terraces and Inner Circle villas were built during the early nineteenth century, and the Park was opened to the public in 1835. Also the site of the London Zoo (or Regent’s Zoo), created in 1828 for scientific study and opened to the public in 1847.--#ghb #lmw51.5312705 -0.15696939999997994

Kind regards from PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
& MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
.