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Letter to George MitfordGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
, 1823 April 3

Edited by Toni Hays.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 11 August 2014. P5. . 3April1823GeorgeMitford1a.JPG, 3April1823GeorgeMitford2.JPG, 3April1823GeorgeMitford3.JPG, 3April1823GeorgeMitford4.JPG, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2014.

Reproduced by courtesy of the The Reading Central Library.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: The Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4, Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 467

One quarto sheet of paper folded in half to form two octavo pages, which comprise pages 1-4 of the letter. The fourth page exposes the address with some of Mitford's mother's writing at the top of the page. The third page has a slight rip where the wax seal was attached. Also, beneath the address to George Mitford is another address to a Miss Foote, an actress in Mitford's play Julian. Address leaf bearing the following postmarks: 1) black circular Mileage stamp[Reading]
[AP 23]
[1823]

[Gap: 1 chars, reason: illegible.]2 2) Red double-circle duty stamp [R]
[23 APR 23]
[1823] [1] Having consulted advertisements in the Morning Post, Miss FooteMaria Foote Stanhope | Born: 1797-07-24 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1867-12-27 in Whitehall, London, England.
Well known English theater actor. She was the daughter of Samuel Foote. She played Alfonso, the King of Sicily in Julian. She performed at Drury Lane from 1814 to 1825 and then began to perform at Covent Garden in 1826. --#ejb
acted in Julian beginning March 15, 1823, through at least April 11, 1823. Therefore, the year on the stamp is most likely 1823.—#bas
A large 7 denoting a fee for a single-sheet letter has been written in black ink by the postal service across the address leaf. The word "single" denotes the number of sheets enclosed in the letter. Red wax seal.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded. Checked for completion. Stamps should be proofed/fixed, there are unidentified people. Fixed/added editorial notes, general transcription fixes. Added missing id's to persNames, added penAnnot_RCL handNote, added address lines. General transcription fixes. Minor transcription fixes, persNames still need to be identified. Proofed and corrected transcription errors. Added note about year of the stamps. Added collection information. Added idno information and fixed photo file permission statement. Updated header to include the correct letter xml:id. Corrected minor formatting error in the respStmt. Proofed and corrected.
page 1
To G. Mitford.George Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 April 3, 1823
April 3 1823 At last my dearest FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw

Mr. Talfourd'sThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
answer is come--He says that we are  he thinks^in his opinion bound in honor  to not to take the Play [2] "The [Two] Foscari"—#penAnnot_RCL away from one house & give it to another--that we could not answer it to ourselves or the PublickPublic--unless some very outrageous conduct on the part of the Committee or Mr. KembleCharles Kemble [3] There is an "x" here, probably left by the pen annotator, indicating a note left somewhere in the letter with more information. However, no such note can be found that corresponds to this mark.—#bas(which certainly in spite of our vexations has not occurred & I hope will not occur) should afford a sufficient & valid season. This is final--I only wish it had arrived two days ago--I have also a letter from Mr. HamiltonSamuel Hamilton, or:
Publisher and editor of the Lady’s Magazine. He took over the publishing business of his father and grandfather, both named Archibald, alongside his brother, also named Archibald. He first appeared as the printer of the magazine in August 1799. Mitford had contributed articles to the magazine, for which Hamilton may have neglected to pay her the total amount due, sometime in 1823. --#bas
, [4] Mitford writes a letter to Samuel HamiltonSamuel Hamilton, or:
Publisher and editor of the Lady’s Magazine. He took over the publishing business of his father and grandfather, both named Archibald, alongside his brother, also named Archibald. He first appeared as the printer of the magazine in August 1799. Mitford had contributed articles to the magazine, for which Hamilton may have neglected to pay her the total amount due, sometime in 1823. --#bas
, editor and publisher of the Lady's MagazineThe Lady's Magazine. . London: 1770-1847.
A popular and influential monthly magazine for women that ran from 1756 until 1847 under various editorships, publishers, and subtitles. It offered fiction, poetry, as well as educational pieces, and spawned a series of immitators, including Blackwood's Lady's Magazine. The first series was published as volumes 1 through 49 from August 1770 to December 1818. Ownership and series numbering are unclear for 1819. It was thereafter continued as "new series" (series two), volumes 1 through 10, from 1820 to 1829, under two different subtitles. Between 1830 and 1832, the magazine advertised volumes one to five as an "improved series." In 1832, it merged with The Lady's Museum and continued until 1837as the Lady's Magazine and Museum of Belle Lettres &c. , improved series, and enlarged, volumes 1 through 11. The magazine underwent a further merger in 1837, when it was continued as the Court Magazine and Monthly Critic and Lady's Magazine and Museum of Belles Lettres, volumes 12 through 31, improved series and enlarged. It ceased publication in 1837 with volume 31. In the 1820s, Mitford was a frequent contributor, contributing the stories and sketches that would later be collected as Our Village. Sources: English Press, Then and Now. ; WorldCat ; "The Lady's Magazine and the Emergence of Women as Active Participants in the Eighteenth-Century Periodical Press." ; "Lady's Magazine" in Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature, vol. 1 (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1940). --#lmw #scw
, on April 9, 1823 about her decision not to withdraw her play, FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. , from Covent GardenTheatre Royal, Covent Garden, London, England | Covent Garden Theatre | Covent Garden | Westminster | London | England | 51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585 | A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the royal "patent theaters." The first theater on this site was opened in 1732 by John Rich, renovated by architect Henry Holland in 1792, and destroyed by fire on 20 Sept. 1808. The second theater, designed by Robert Smirke, opened on 18 Sept. 1809 and was managed by John Phillip Kemble. Because of rent increases by the Duke of Bedford, the landowner, J.P. Kemble increased ticket prices. This led to the "old price (or O.P.) riots" and the eventual lowering of ticket prices, although the proprietors proved they would lose money at those prices. The second theater was destroyed by fire on 5 March 1856. The third theater, designed by Edward Middleton Barry, opened in 1858 and remains at the center of today’s theater complex. The theater became the Royal Opera House in 1892 and the building was renovated and expanded in the 1980s and 1990s. --#lmw51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585. She also mentions that she will have a submission ready soon for the magazine, and also inquires about a harsh review of her play, JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. , that had appeared in the London MagazineThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
.—#bas
backing out of the message which he certainly delivered to me  and talking ofof removing the Play to Drury Lane & talking not of the present but the next season--I have no doubt in spite of this letter, from the few words that passed between Mr. EllistonRobert William Elliston | Born: 1774-04-07 in London, United Kingdom. Died: 1831-07-07 in London, United Kingdom.
Ran away from home to become an actor. Over his career he would eventually act at Drury Lane, gaining enough money to start his own theater ventures as a theatre manager. Elliston managed Drury Lane and other theaters, and he is mentioned in the writings of Leigh Hunt, Byron, and Macready.The later years leading up to his death involved periods of illness, bankruptcy, and chronic alcoholism --#jap #jmh #lmw
& Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
, that the Play would still be brought out at Drury LaneTheatre Royal, Drury Lane, London, England | Drury Lane Theatre | Covent Garden | Westminster | London | England | 51.5128536 -0.12037150000003294 | A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the royal "patent theatres." Between 1674 and 1791, a building designed by Christopher Wren and commissioned by manager Thomas Killgrew. The Wren building was torn down by R. B. Sheridan and rebuilt. It reopened in 1791 and was destroyed by fire in 1809. The theater reopened in 1812 and still stands today. --#lmw51.5128536 -0.12037150000003294 if we liked,--  but after what Mr. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
has said it would be much better not to think of it--Indeed it is impossible to think of it, for I am sure he would feel himself offended & implicated if we did-- For my own part, I am heartily glad not to have again to encounter this terrible enmity & malignity of Magazines & newspapers--My next play--if ever I have courage & spirits to write another, shall have no name, no woman to attack. [5] The next play that Mitford writes, RienziRienzi; a Tragedy, in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London : J. Cumberland . 1828.
There appears to be no printed edition of Rienzi authorized by Mitford upon its first performance in 1828. The first printed edition of the play appears in the J. Cumberland series Cumberland's British Theatre.--#lmw
, is written not anonymously, but under her name in 1828.—#bas
I am sure that The LondonThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
[6] Magazine—#penAnnot_RCL must be very bad indeed, for Miss Andrews to whom I wrote requesting her to send it to me by the Postman this morning, has not sent it. [7] Here Mitford's premonitions are correct. In the particular edition of The London Magazine she speaks of, the critic eviscerates the performance of Mr. Macready, while admiring the work of Mitford's writing in it of itself.—#tnh Can you at all guess who wrote it?-- [Mr. ProcterBryan Waller Procter, or: Barry Cornwall | Born: 1787-11-21 in Leeds, Yorkshire, England. Died: 1874-10-05 in London, England.
A friend of Charles Lamb, Procter contributed poetry to the Naturalist’s Calendar and later contributed to the edition of Finden’s Tableaux edited by Mitford. He wrote a biography of Edmund Kean in 1835 and a biography of Lamb in 1866. --#lmw
]
used to page 2
write the dramatic article in that Magazine--but we must not suspect him--even though I know how Mr. Kemble's conversation suspecting him & Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
that he has joined managerial faction.--Well we must endure it as we may. What you say of Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
's indisposition grieves me very much--I hope if he be not quite recovered that he will not think of going through the terrible fatigue of acting JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. to night. Have you given him my letter? I hope not--if you had any previous conversation with Mr. Hamilton you would not--if you have not bring it back to me--if you have I shall write a note tomorrow--when I shall probably hear whether you have met.--Mr. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
advises that   FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. be left for the present at Convent GardenTheatre Royal, Covent Garden, London, England | Covent Garden Theatre | Covent Garden | Westminster | London | England | 51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585 | A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the royal "patent theaters." The first theater on this site was opened in 1732 by John Rich, renovated by architect Henry Holland in 1792, and destroyed by fire on 20 Sept. 1808. The second theater, designed by Robert Smirke, opened on 18 Sept. 1809 and was managed by John Phillip Kemble. Because of rent increases by the Duke of Bedford, the landowner, J.P. Kemble increased ticket prices. This led to the "old price (or O.P.) riots" and the eventual lowering of ticket prices, although the proprietors proved they would lose money at those prices. The second theater was destroyed by fire on 5 March 1856. The third theater, designed by Edward Middleton Barry, opened in 1858 and remains at the center of today’s theater complex. The theater became the Royal Opera House in 1892 and the building was renovated and expanded in the 1980s and 1990s. --#lmw51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585--& I agree that it shall--but not to be acted with Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
for the Doge--never that--he will rely on my assurances on that point I know.--Pray ascertain whether the dedication copy has been sent to him & one equally good to Mr. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
's--& whether the copies have been sent to the Theatre, for all the Performers, the lady & gentleman who spoke the Prologue & Epilogue--the Committee & Mr. FawcettJohn Fawcett, or: Mr. Fawcett | Born: 1768-08-29. Died: 1837.
English actor and dramatist. Mitford likely refers to the younger Fawcett, a contemporary of John Emery (John Fawcett the elder (1740-1817) was also an actor). Appeared in Colman’s The Heir at Law. Wrote pantomime version of Obi, or Three-Fingered Jack (1800) Source: DNB. --#lmw
--all with the Author's compliments & thanks.--I beg you will also send one, through Longman's to Miss Howell at J. Shepperd's [8] This is possibly a untraced inn where Miss Howell may have been staying.—#bas Esqre Hampstead HeathHampstead, Camden, London, England | Hampstead village | Hampstead | Camden | London | England | 51.5556461 -0.17617489999997815 | Village nearLondon, north west of Charing Cross, now enclosed by it. Its population was rapidly growing through the nineteenth century, and Hampstead Heath is now a public park.--#lmw #ebb51.5556461 -0.17617489999997815--one to Mr. BurgessMr. Burgess
A "Mr. Burgess" who recommended a particular volume of Sophocles’ plays to MRM, mentioned in her letter to Talfourd of Nov. 12-13 1821 .--#lmw
--& one to Miss Booth & another to Mrs. RowdenFrances Arabella St. Quentin Rowden | Born: 1774 in London. Died: 1840.
English school teacher, author, and Mitford tutor. Also taught Caroline Lamb, Fanny Kemble, and L.E.L.. Worked at M. St. Quentin School at 22 Hans Place, London, where Mary Russell Mitford attended as a student, and where she in company with Rowden, attended plays at the London theatres. The St. Quentin school at Hans Place was founded by Dominique de St. Quentin, a French emigre, whose name (and the school’s name) is spelled "Quintin" in the L’Estrange edition of Mitford’s letters. St. Quentin and his wife, Ann Pitts, originally ran a school in Reading, where he first hired Frances Rowden to teach, but according to the ODNB, St. Quentin had to sell the Reading school due to gambling debts he accumulated in the company of Richard Valpy and George Mitford. When the St. Quentins moved to Paris following Napoleon’s defeat, Rowden followed them there in 1818 and started a school at the rue d’Angoulême which later moved to Champs-Elysées , and it was in her Paris school that she taught Fanny Kemble between 1821 and 1825 . After the death of St. Quentin’s wife, Frances Rowden married him in 1825 but little is known of her following this point, and the ODNB indicates that the death date of 1840 supplied for her is speculative. In The Queens of Society by Grace and Philip Wharton, the authors note that, while unmarried, Frances Rowden "styled herself Mrs. Rowden" (1860: 148). Rowden wrote poetry, including Poetical Introduction to the Study of Botany (1801) and The Pleasures of Friendship: A Poem, in two parts (1810, rpt. 1812, 1818); also wrote textbooks, including A Christian Wreath for the Pagan Dieties (1820, illus. Caroline Lamb), and A Biographical Sketch of the Most Distinguished Writers of Ancient and Modern Times (1821, illus. Caroline Lamb). (See Landon Memoirs; See also L’Estrange, ed. The Life of Mary Russell Mitford: Told by Herself, Volume I, pages 11-17 . --#lmw #ebb
through Mr. JonesThomas Jones
A saddler of Three Mile Cross. Noted by Needham on a list of local tradespeople derived from the Post Office Directory of Berkshire, 1847 edition. Also in the 1854 edition. Source: NeedhamPapers, Reading Central Library . --#scw
if he will take charge of them to Paris.--And pray try to find out who wrote the Article in the LondonThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
--Mr. [Southern], at the HoflandBarbara Wreaks Hofland | Born: 1770 in Yorkshire. Died: 1844-11-04 in Richmond-on-Thames.
Novelist and writer of children’s books popular in England and America, Barbara Hofland was a native of Sheffield, Yorkshire, where she published poems from July 1794 in the local newspaper, The Sheffield Iris. Her first marriage to Thomas Bradshawe Hoole left her widowed and in poverty, raising a son, Frederic, on her own, and she supported herself by publishing poems and children’s books, and by running a girl’s school in Harrogate. second marriage was to the artist Thomas Christopher Hofland. (Source: ODNB)--#ebb
's, is likely to know--you will make my kindest page 3
regards there of course just if you are in that neighborhood call & ask after dear Miss PordenEleanor Anne Franklin Porden | Born: 1795-07-14 in London, England. Died: 1825-02-22 in London, England.
British poet. Author of The Veils; or the Triumph of Constancy (1815). Author of Coeur de Lion; or the Third Crusade. A Poem in 16 books. (historical epic, 1822). Married Arctic explorer Sir John Franklin in 1823. Died 22 Feb. 1825 of consumption, complicated by childbirth. --#lmw
--I hope your cold is better--my cough is going fast & dear mamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
is better too--& every thing else is well. I have just found out what killed my geraniums they had not been watered I am sure since I sent them away till they come back again & then the water ran through the cracked earth, as hard as a rock, & did no good--I have been working at them all morning poor things.--We have not been the CrowthersMr. Crowther
The "dandy" Mitford pokes fun at in her letters of 9 and 10 January, 1819 . Possibly husband to Isabelle Crowther. According to Coles, forename may be Phillip; Coles is not completely confident that the "dandy" Mr. Crowther and Mr. [Phillip?] Crowther are the same person. The second Mr. Crowther is a correspondent of Mitford’s, whom she writes to at Whitley cottage, near Reading. He may also have resided at Westbury on Trim near Bristol. William Coles is uncertain of whether Crowtheris the same Phillip Crowthermentioned in Mitford’s Diary. Source: William Coles, Letter to Needham, 10 November 1957, NeedhamPapers, Reading Central Library. --#lmw #scw
or any one but Miss BrookeMiss Brooke Brooke
A correspondent of Mitford’s, to whom she writes at 11 East Cliff, Brighton. William Colessuggests that this could be a summer address, and that she was a resident of Reading. She was courted by Dr. Valpy in October 1823. Source: Letter from William Coles to Needham, 10 November 1957 , Needham Papers, --#scw
who is gone to Odiham this morning. Pray do not forget to bring a pot of the white paint without smell ^& another of black--I would really write another play to get this room made decent without offense to MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
.--God bless you my own dearest FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
--


Ever most fondly your'syours
M.R. M[Gap: 6 chars, reason: torn.][itford]

To George Mitford EsqreGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw

Old Betty's Chop House
[9] According to Imperial London by Arthur Henry Beavan, Old Betty's Chop House was a tavern along the Strand. This tavern was close to the theatres at Covent GardenTheatre Royal, Covent Garden, London, England | Covent Garden Theatre | Covent Garden | Westminster | London | England | 51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585 | A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the royal "patent theaters." The first theater on this site was opened in 1732 by John Rich, renovated by architect Henry Holland in 1792, and destroyed by fire on 20 Sept. 1808. The second theater, designed by Robert Smirke, opened on 18 Sept. 1809 and was managed by John Phillip Kemble. Because of rent increases by the Duke of Bedford, the landowner, J.P. Kemble increased ticket prices. This led to the "old price (or O.P.) riots" and the eventual lowering of ticket prices, although the proprietors proved they would lose money at those prices. The second theater was destroyed by fire on 5 March 1856. The third theater, designed by Edward Middleton Barry, opened in 1858 and remains at the center of today’s theater complex. The theater became the Royal Opera House in 1892 and the building was renovated and expanded in the 1980s and 1990s. --#lmw51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585 and Drury LaneTheatre Royal, Drury Lane, London, England | Drury Lane Theatre | Covent Garden | Westminster | London | England | 51.5128536 -0.12037150000003294 | A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the royal "patent theatres." Between 1674 and 1791, a building designed by Christopher Wren and commissioned by manager Thomas Killgrew. The Wren building was torn down by R. B. Sheridan and rebuilt. It reopened in 1791 and was destroyed by fire in 1809. The theater reopened in 1812 and still stands today. --#lmw51.5128536 -0.12037150000003294.—#tnh No. 415 Strand
LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223

Miss FooteMaria Foote Stanhope | Born: 1797-07-24 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1867-12-27 in Whitehall, London, England.
Well known English theater actor. She was the daughter of Samuel Foote. She played Alfonso, the King of Sicily in Julian. She performed at Drury Lane from 1814 to 1825 and then began to perform at Covent Garden in 1826. --#ejb
[10] Miss Foote was an actress who originated in the breeches role of Alfonso in Mitford's play, JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. —#tnh
34 Keppell St
Russell
Sqr

--Miss Barnes says she wrote to me by return of post--so that the note must have been lost--or perhaps misoriented--for she is very absent. She talks of being back in a fortnight but not this way--& wants me to secure her a box for then.--As if I ever dared look forward in that way!--God bless you!

The following enlightened Epistle came from WinchesterWinchester, Hampshire, England | Winchester | Hampshire | England | 51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 | City and county town of Hampshire. Site of Winchester Cathedral and Winchester College, one of the oldest public grammar schools. Jane Austen died here and is buried in the Cathedral. John Keats wrote several of his best-known poems while on a visit to the city.--#lmw51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 (by way of ColeyColey Park, Berkshire, England | Coley | Coley Park | Berkshire | England | 51.4432268 -0.9902848000000404 | An estate just south west of Reading. The Moncks owned Coley Park from 1810 and Mitford occasionally posted franked letters from there when J. B Monck was a Member of Parliament. Also referred to as "Coley," although this name also refers to a nearby district of Reading proper. | --#lmw51.4432268 -0.9902848000000404) this morning. "My dear friend on the receipt of your newspaper I immediately wrote to you [expressive] of our delight at the successful result of JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. , which letter I trust reached its destination. This I mention because our servant Boy might as we suppose have neglected to put the letter in the Post. I have only to repeat out congratulations of many thanks for the Publication.

Is there a prospect of seeing you. Our best love to all

Ever yours in Haste John Woodburn WinchesterWinchester, Hampshire, England | Winchester | Hampshire | England | 51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 | City and county town of Hampshire. Site of Winchester Cathedral and Winchester College, one of the oldest public grammar schools. Jane Austen died here and is buried in the Cathedral. John Keats wrote several of his best-known poems while on a visit to the city.--#lmw51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 March 29th. I am rejoiced my dear HusbandGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
to find your cold was better you had a beautiful day for your Journey I can page 4
We shall send in Henry in the morning for the Parcel by the Regulator. As you may be certain we shall be very anxious to get it. God Bless you ever & ever
I cannot see most truly yours
Mary MitfordMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw