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Letter to B.R. Haydon, Esq.Benjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, dateFebruary 9th, 1824

Edited by Melissa J. Klamer .

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: October 26, 2017. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: DSCN2551.jpg, DSCN2550.jpg, DSCN2549.jpg, DSCN2548.jpg, DSCN2547.jpg .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
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Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361549 ff. 481

Folio sheet of paper, with four surfaces photographed. Four pages (1 leaf), folded in half, folded again in thirds. The first three surfaces are written as pages of the letter; the fourth contains the address leaf. Address leaf bearing the folowing postmarks: 1) A black mileage stamp, partially legible Ct Surrey [Gap: reason: illegible.]. 2) A sepia-inked oval Delivery stamp, double lined rim reading 8*MORN*8
* FE * 8 *
1824 3) A sepia-inked oval Delivery stamp, reading 10*F*Noon*10
* FE * 9 *
1824 A large 3 denoting the posting fee has been written in black ink by the postal service across the address leaf. Sheet (pages three and four) torn on right edge of page three where wax seal was removed. Red wax seal, partial, adhered to the corner of pages three and four.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
To B R Haydon Esq. Someone, apparently other than Mitford, perhaps cataloging letters and describing them, who left grey pencil marks and numbered her letters now in the Reading Central Library's collection. The pencil has inscribed the date "Feby 9th 1824" at the top left of the first leaf. This letter is also numbered "18" in the top center of the first leaf to the right of the opener. Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864Wednesday Night My dear SirBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
,

I have to thank you for two very charming letters--to congratulate you most heartily on your escape from two such disagreeable oddities as your late landlord & landlady, & to wish you all prosperity in your new abode--I do not wish you happiness--for you have it--With such a wife & such a boy, & such a consciousness of [Gap: reason: torn.][th]ose blessings I do really think you the happiest man in the world. Does Mrs. HaydonMary Hyman Haydon
The daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Cobley, the Rector of Dodbrooke, Kingsbridge, Devon, she was widowed with two children when she married Benjamin Robert Haydon on 10 October 1821.--#ghb
ever see your letters to me? If not I will lend them to her sometime or other just that she may see how a married lover can write of his "mistress"--that being our country phrase for wife--& I think a very pretty one.--must take--& who even in this age of can't & can object to the moral? Was not it the finest comic moral in the world?--The moral of the [Gap: 1 word, reason: unclear.]page 2
Depend upon it the picture will take--It must & it shall. I quite long to see it. I had prepared all my discretion to keep the secret when I on the intelligence in print in the last No. but one of the New MonthlyNew Monthly Magazine.
Periodical edited by Thomas Campbell from 1821 to 1830. Talfourd was a contributor.--#ebb
, & then I treated my dear father & mother with reading them your letter. I found there too in one of M. HazlittWilliam Hazlitt | Born: 1778-04-10 in Maidstone, Kent, England. Died: 1830-09-18 in Soho, London, England.
Essayist and critic, acquaintance of Mary Russell Mitford. Author of Table Talk (1821) and The Spirit of the Age (1825). Also authored collections of critical essays such as Characters of Shakespeare (1817), A View of the English Stage (1818), and English Comic Writers (1819). In a letter of 2 October 1820 , Mary Russell Mitford writes of Hazlitt to their mutual friend Haydon, He is the most delightful critic in the [world]-- puts all his taste, his wit, his deep thinking, his matchless acuteness into his subject, but he does not put his whole heart & soul into it [. . . ] What charms me most in Mr. Haslitt is the beautiful candour which he bursts forth sometimes from his own prejudices [ . . . ] I admire him so ardently that when I begin to talk of him I never know how to stop. I could talk on for an hour in a see saw of praise and blame as he himself does of Beaumont & Fletcher & some of his old [favourites]. --#lmw #cmm
's delightful Table Talks the terrible story of Mr. WordsworthWilliam Wordsworth | Born: 1770-04-07 in Cockermouth, England. Died: 1850-04-23 in Cumberland, England. 's letter to you--which spoils his poetry to me--for there was about his poetry something personal--we cling to him and to CowperWilliam Cowper | Born: 1731-11-26 in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire, England. Died: 1800-04-25 in East Dereham, Norfolk, England.
--
--& now--It will not bear talking of--"Jeremy Bentham" is also I think by Mr. HazlittWilliam Hazlitt | Born: 1778-04-10 in Maidstone, Kent, England. Died: 1830-09-18 in Soho, London, England.
Essayist and critic, acquaintance of Mary Russell Mitford. Author of Table Talk (1821) and The Spirit of the Age (1825). Also authored collections of critical essays such as Characters of Shakespeare (1817), A View of the English Stage (1818), and English Comic Writers (1819). In a letter of 2 October 1820 , Mary Russell Mitford writes of Hazlitt to their mutual friend Haydon, He is the most delightful critic in the [world]-- puts all his taste, his wit, his deep thinking, his matchless acuteness into his subject, but he does not put his whole heart & soul into it [. . . ] What charms me most in Mr. Haslitt is the beautiful candour which he bursts forth sometimes from his own prejudices [ . . . ] I admire him so ardently that when I begin to talk of him I never know how to stop. I could talk on for an hour in a see saw of praise and blame as he himself does of Beaumont & Fletcher & some of his old [favourites]. --#lmw #cmm
--I wonder if he ever heard a story told to me by your Countryman Mr. NorthmoreThomas Northmore | Born: 1776 in Fulham, Middlesex. Died: 1851 in Furzebrook House, near Axminster.
An acquaintance of MRM. In a letter to Haydon dated 9 February 1824 , Mitford refers to Mr. Northmore as "a great Devonshire reformer, one of the bad epic poets and very pleasant men in which that country abounds" ( Life of Mary Russell Mitford ed. L’Estrange Vol II, page 22 ).--#kab
--a great Devonshire Reformer--one of the bad epic poets, & very pleasant men in which that country abounds. He said that Jeremy Bentham being on a visit at a ShewShow house in those parts at a time when he was little known except as a Jurist through the translations of M. Dumont--certainly before the publication of the Church of Englandism or any such enormities--Mrs. Hannah MoreHannah More | Born: 1745-02-02 in Fishponds, Bristol, England. Died: 1833-09-07 in Clifton, Bristol, England.
Hannah More began her career in 1770s London as a successful playwright and associate of David Garrick, Samuel Johnson, Elizabeth Montagu, and Joshua Reynolds. She was a prominent member of the Bluestocking group of women following Montagu’s salon. In the 1780s, she brought the working-class Bristol poet Ann Yearsley to public attention, and became increasingly active with abolitionists and evangelicals such as William Willberforce and Beilby Porteus, Bishop of London. With her sister Martha, More became active in philanthropic activities intended to improve the living conditions and education of the poor, including setting up Sunday Schools to teach reading. Between the 1780s and the 1830s she was a prolific and popular author of novels, conduct books, and ethical tracts, including Strictures on the Modern System of Female Education (1799) and Practical Piety (1811). She wrote numerous moralistic poems and prose sketches aimed at literate working-class poor audiences, including Village Politics, by Will Chip (1792), and later worked with Porteus on the series Cheap Repository Tracts (1795 to 1797), the most famous of which is The Shepherd of Salisbury Plain . --#lmw
, being at a Wateringpage 3
place in the neighborhood was m[Gap: reason: seal.][inded] to see him, & availed herself of the house being one which was shewnshownshewn on stated days to pay a visit to the Philosopher. He was in the library when the news arrived--& the lady being already in the ante chamber & no possible mode of escape presenting itself, he sent one servant to detain her a few minutes, & employed another to build him up with books in a corner of the room--when the folios & quartos rose above his head the curious lady was admitted. Must not it have been a droll scene?--The philosopher playing at bopeep in his [Gap: reason: torn.][e]ntrenchment, & the pious maiden, who had previously ascertained that he was in the  room, peering after him in all the agony of baffled curiosity.-- Your Frank must be a charming little fellow--Give my love to him & his dear Mother--How well I can fancy you darting about in your half furnished house, doing half every body's work with your own rapid hands. No wonder that when the babble was over you should feel a little languid like a young lady after a ball.--God bless you my dear friend--All happiness be with you & your'syours--.


Ever very sincerely.
M. R. MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
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To


B. R. Haydon EsqreBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw


57 Sovereign Terrace

Connaught Place

Edgeware Road