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Letter to T.N. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
, July 29, 1825

Edited by Kellie Donovan-Condron.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 20 March 2015. P5. Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. The Digital Mitford editors' photos from this archive are not permitted for public distribution. Photo files: DSCN1176.jpg, DSCN1177.jpg, DSCN1178.jpg, DSCN1179.jpg, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2015.

Courtesy of The University of ManchesterThe John Rylands Library
The John Rylands Library at the University of Manchester holds 180 of Mitford’s letters from 1821 to 1843, including most of her correspondence to Thomas Noon Talfourd.--#ghb

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: The John Rylands University Library. Shelf mark: JRL English MS 665 no. 20 Coles no. 91

Folio sheet of paper folded in half to form four quarto pages, with correspondence on 1-4 and address leaf on page 4, then folded in thirds twice more. Letter is torn at the bottom, and a piece is missing from the right edge. Cross-writing on the top of page 1, and on the right edge of page 4. Round red wax seal right of center on page 4.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 July 29th 1825. My dear friendThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
--

I have received from Charles KembleCharles Kemble the following letter--My dear MadamMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
--I am in TownLondon_city
Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw
but have been so very much engaged for the last few days in winding up the affairs of the past season that I could not have paid that attention to your TragedyCharles the First; An Historical Tragedy, in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London : J. Duncombe . 1834. [1] MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
had sent her play Charles ICharles the First; An Historical Tragedy, in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London : J. Duncombe . 1834. to KembleCharles Kemble earlier in the summer.—#kdc
which any work of yours may justly demand--This evening I leave LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 & shall not return to it till the first week in September; if you will then send the M. S. to Soho SquareSoho Square, Soho, London, England | Soho | London | England | 51.5153202 -0.1321436000000631 | A square in the Soho district of London. It was originally called King Square after Charles II, whose statue still stood in the square’s garden in Mitford’s time. According to Mitford, Charles Kemble and his wife lived in Soho Square in the 1820s.--#lmw51.5153202 -0.1321436000000631 I shall have great pleasure in reading it; & I can promise you an honest opinion upon its probable success. I need not assure you that it will delight me to find it exceed in promise all your former dramatic efforts, and that my gratification will be encreased tenfold should its performance be productive of a remuneration commensurate with your patience and your toil"--then an answer to some questions I had asked about the Harnesses &  a very kind conclusion--Now this letter is certainly kind although rather too much in the "motives of charity"[2] Proverbial rather than a direct quotation. The phrase was in common use in religious as well as legal contexts in the nineteenth century and earlier.—#lmw spirit quite to hit my fancy--but what a dose of suspence again!--The playCharles the First; An Historical Tragedy, in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London : J. Duncombe . 1834. is finished[3] MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
was still working on Charles ICharles the First; An Historical Tragedy, in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London : J. Duncombe . 1834. in June, according to her letter to TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
dated June 29, 1825.—#kdc
--& I am quite longing to shewshow it to you--shall you be in TownLondon_city
Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw
before Charles KembleCharles Kemble returns?--I am very doubtful of it--Mr. Fitzharris Fitzharris Mr. Fitzharris
An Irish actor who began his career in Reading before going to London. He played the title role in Othello in both Reading and London, and appeared the following season (1826) as the Sentinel in Pizarro at Covent Garden. Reviews of his London performances in the New Monthly Magazine and The Literary Gazette and Journal of Belles Lettres from 1825 and 1826 were very unfavorable, indicating that his voice and presence were not sufficiently robust to sustain major roles in London. Mitford saw him perform in Othello at Reading. She was impressed with his talents and he later created the role of Celso in Charles the First. In an 1867 letter to L’Estrange (reprinted in The Literary Life of the Rev. William Harness), Harness mentions Fitzharris as a failed "protege" of Mitford’s (279). --#kdc #lmw
, the only person who has seen it says that it will certainly be accepted & succeed--that CharlesCharles the First
King of England in Mitford’s play, Charles I.--#ebb
is now a shewyshowy part & one that will please Mr. KembleCharles Kemble--& that if Mr. YoungMayne Charles Young
English actor (1777-1856). Performed at Covent Garden and Drury Lane between 1807 and 1832. Rival of Kean. Known for his Hamlet. Written about by Washington Irving. --#lmw
chuseschooses to put his strength to CromwellOliver Cromwell
Cromwell’s character in King in Mitford’s play, Charles I.--#ebb
it will suit him so well as to make the fortune of the playCharles the First; An Historical Tragedy, in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London : J. Duncombe . 1834. ,which depends entirely [4] small tear at the bottom of each page, with a piece folded up—#kdcpage 2
on the representation of that   character--But I am afraid even of that--I doubt if I have sustained the tone of the part--& I am sure that the first act is much the best--In short no one can have less hope than I have altogether--I believe in the first place that it will not be accepted--in the second that it will not be licensed--in the third that it will not succeed--People say by way of comforting me that I always think ill of my own doings--but that is a mistake--I never doubted of RienziRienzi; a Tragedy, in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London : J. Cumberland . 1828.
There appears to be no printed edition of Rienzi authorized by Mitford upon its first performance in 1828. The first printed edition of the play appears in the J. Cumberland series Cumberland's British Theatre.--#lmw
--nor of my little bookas far as it goes--But of this "Charles"Charles the First; An Historical Tragedy, in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London : J. Duncombe . 1834. I do doubt most exceedingly--It wants incident wants action wants pathos wants interest wants life--& I doubt very much whether the character & the writing be good enough to counterbalance these terrible deficiencies. The only comfort is that the new parts are better than the old--& that if I could once get the encouragement of success, I am sure that after four or five years  ^passed in dramatic composition I could write a good Tragedy--but that will not happen--I shall be driven to spinning out wretched trash of novels--I know it--& I know how utterly contemptible they will be--& how completely I shall sink to the level of the Minerva PressMinerva Press
Press operated by William Lane from 1790 to 1820. Minerva Press was a major publisher of Gothic novels and other popular fiction.--#kdc
--Well if you return to TownLondon_city
Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw
in time you will I know have the goodness to read "Charles"Charles the First; An Historical Tragedy, in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London : J. Duncombe . 1834. & give me your honest opinion--If the part should please Charles KembleCharles Kemble, the excellent getting up of that house might save the play.--I understand that there are a great many candidates coming forward in Tragedy besides Mr. Fitzharris Fitzharris Mr. Fitzharris
An Irish actor who began his career in Reading before going to London. He played the title role in Othello in both Reading and London, and appeared the following season (1826) as the Sentinel in Pizarro at Covent Garden. Reviews of his London performances in the New Monthly Magazine and The Literary Gazette and Journal of Belles Lettres from 1825 and 1826 were very unfavorable, indicating that his voice and presence were not sufficiently robust to sustain major roles in London. Mitford saw him perform in Othello at Reading. She was impressed with his talents and he later created the role of Celso in Charles the First. In an 1867 letter to L’Estrange (reprinted in The Literary Life of the Rev. William Harness), Harness mentions Fitzharris as a failed "protege" of Mitford’s (279). --#kdc #lmw
& Mr. SerleThomas James Serle
British actor, author, theater manager (1798-1889). Appeared with Kean and Charles Kemble. Married Cecilia Kemble. Wrote Joan of Arc, the Maid of Orleans, a Historical Drama; and The Shadow on the Wall. Served as Secretary of The Dramatic Author’s Society. --#lmw #cmm
--a Mr. WardWardeJames Warde Prescott, or: James Prescott Warde, Mr. Warde
British actor. (1792-1840). Used the professional name "Mr. Warde". Appeared at Covent Garden. --#lmw
from DublinDublin, Leinster, Ireland | Dublin Leinster Ireland | 53.3498053 -6.260309699999993 | The capital and largest city of Ireland, located in the province of Leinster at the mouth of the River Liffey.--#lmw53.3498053 -6.260309699999993 is to come out in Leon
Character in Rule a Wife and Have a Wife by Beaumont and Fletcher --#kdc
--Mr. Fitzharris Fitzharris Mr. Fitzharris
An Irish actor who began his career in Reading before going to London. He played the title role in Othello in both Reading and London, and appeared the following season (1826) as the Sentinel in Pizarro at Covent Garden. Reviews of his London performances in the New Monthly Magazine and The Literary Gazette and Journal of Belles Lettres from 1825 and 1826 were very unfavorable, indicating that his voice and presence were not sufficiently robust to sustain major roles in London. Mitford saw him perform in Othello at Reading. She was impressed with his talents and he later created the role of Celso in Charles the First. In an 1867 letter to L’Estrange (reprinted in The Literary Life of the Rev. William Harness), Harness mentions Fitzharris as a failed "protege" of Mitford’s (279). --#kdc #lmw
says that he will certainly succeed in that part, which page 3
is peculiar & effective & which he plays admirably, but will probably fail afterwards--He says that although much older than himself Mr. WardWardeJames Warde Prescott, or: James Prescott Warde, Mr. Warde
British actor. (1792-1840). Used the professional name "Mr. Warde". Appeared at Covent Garden. --#lmw
& he are so alike on the stage as scarcely to be distinguished from each other. Mr. BennettGeorge John Bennett | Born: 1800 in Ripon, Yorkshire, England. Died: 1879.
Versatile actor who played comic and tragic roles with success. Performed in the provinces, then at Drury Lane from 1825-1826, in Dublin from 1826-28, and at Covent Garden in 1828 before moving to the suburban London theater of Sadler’s Wells. Retired from acting in 1862. Said to have inaugurated a new, more sympathetic and serious style of playing Caliban, which had previously been considered a comic wild man character. --#lmw
is discharged for carelessness & inattention & Mr. Fitzharris Fitzharris Mr. Fitzharris
An Irish actor who began his career in Reading before going to London. He played the title role in Othello in both Reading and London, and appeared the following season (1826) as the Sentinel in Pizarro at Covent Garden. Reviews of his London performances in the New Monthly Magazine and The Literary Gazette and Journal of Belles Lettres from 1825 and 1826 were very unfavorable, indicating that his voice and presence were not sufficiently robust to sustain major roles in London. Mitford saw him perform in Othello at Reading. She was impressed with his talents and he later created the role of Celso in Charles the First. In an 1867 letter to L’Estrange (reprinted in The Literary Life of the Rev. William Harness), Harness mentions Fitzharris as a failed "protege" of Mitford’s (279). --#kdc #lmw
is in some hopes that Charles KembleCharles Kemble may either engage him in that situation or at least keep it vacant till he has seen him--He seems to have made up his mind not to take an  situationappearance without an engagement--& that perhaps as much from confidence in his own powers as diffidence--certainly at four & twenty he has time enough to go to LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223--There is no doubt of his being at the head of his profession some day or other in my opinion--By the way he says that the third Act the trial scene which you did not [like][5] The paper is torn at the right edge, obliterating this word and the words at the end of the next two lines.—#kdc is exceedingly dramatic & full of situation to [Gap: 1 word, reason: torn.][be] sure it has now the address to CromwellOliver Cromwell
Cromwell’s character in King in Mitford’s play, Charles I.--#ebb
at [Gap: 2 word, reason: torn.][the end]--& you must have a natural aversion to Trials--but still I am afraid you are much the better critic of the two.--How do you get on this CircuitOxford Circuit | England | Oxford Circuit was one of six assize circuits in England and Wales. Before 1830, the Oxford Circuit consisted of the counties of Oxford, Worcester, Stafford, Salop, Hereford, Monmouth, Gloucester, and Berkshire. Judges were appointed by the monarch and traveled the Circuit twice per year to hear trials of serious crimes. Talfourd was appointed to the Oxford Circuit in 1821. --#kdc? I never look at a paper & therefore do not know--& above all how are you in health? This weather must have been terrible in Court--And how are all at home?--I meant to have waited for the chance of a frank--but M.P.sMembers of Parliament are scarce & the CircuitOxford Circuit | England | Oxford Circuit was one of six assize circuits in England and Wales. Before 1830, the Oxford Circuit consisted of the counties of Oxford, Worcester, Stafford, Salop, Hereford, Monmouth, Gloucester, and Berkshire. Judges were appointed by the monarch and traveled the Circuit twice per year to hear trials of serious crimes. Talfourd was appointed to the Oxford Circuit in 1821. --#kdc post so uncertain that my FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
tells me I had better not. wait--No news that I know in ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753--except that young Mr. VinesMr. Vines
Coles says this is the son of Edward Vines, possibly named Jacob, see p. 524, note 9. Needs additional research.--#kdc #lmw
is looking about for a house, & that Frederick BulleyFrederick Bulley | Born: 1810 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1885-09-03 in Fairford, Gloucestershire, England.
Born in Reading, Berkshire, the third son of John Bulley and Charlotte Pocock. He obtained his BA (1829), MA (1832), BD (1840) and DD (1855) as a member of Magdalen College, University of Oxford. He became President of Magdalen Collegefrom 5 January 1855 until his death. --#kdc #lmw
(AlcestisAlcestis. Euripides.
Athenian tragedy attributed to Euripides. First produced at the City Dionysia festival in 438 BCE; one of the earliest surviving plays of the playwright.--#lmw
) has gained the Demyship[6] A scholarship at Magdalen CollegeMagdalen College, Oxford University, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England | Oxford | Oxfordshire | England | 51.7522849 -1.2470926999999392 | One of the constituent colleges of Oxford University. | --#lmw51.7522849 -1.2470926999999392, Oxford UniversityUniversity of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England | Oxford University | Oxford | Oxfordshire | England | 51.7566341 -1.2547036999999364 | Research university made up of constituent colleges; the oldest university in the English-speaking world.--#lmw51.7566341 -1.2547036999999364, for half of the amount awarded to Fellows.—#kdc of Maudlin[7] A derivation of Magdalen, now obscure. Source: OED—#kdc for which his stupidpage 4
Brother  tried twice & failed--FrederickFrederick Bulley | Born: 1810 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1885-09-03 in Fairford, Gloucestershire, England.
Born in Reading, Berkshire, the third son of John Bulley and Charlotte Pocock. He obtained his BA (1829), MA (1832), BD (1840) and DD (1855) as a member of Magdalen College, University of Oxford. He became President of Magdalen Collegefrom 5 January 1855 until his death. --#kdc #lmw
is not yet fifteen & there were six & twenty candidates & only two vacancies, so that this success is very honourable to him & will be very delightful to the DoctorRichard Valpy, Doctor of Divinity (DD), Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries (FSA), or: Dr. Valpy | Born: 1754-12-07 in St. John’s, Jersey, Channel Islands. Died: 1836-03-28 in Reading, Berkshire, England.
Richard Valpy (the fourth of that name) was the eldest son of Richard Valpy [III] and Catherine Chevalier. He was born on December 7, 1754 at St. John’s, Jersey, Channel Islands. He was a friend and literary mentor to Mary Russell Mitford. He matriculated at Pembroke College, Oxford University on April 1, 1773, aged eighteen, as a Morley scholar. He received from Oxford a B.A. (1776), M.A. (1784), B.D. & D.D. (1792). He took orders in the Church of England in 1777. Richard Valpy served as Second Master at Bury School, Bury, Huntindonshire from 1771 to 1781, and was also collated to the rectory of Stradishall, Suffolk, in 1787. He became the Headmaster at Reading School, Reading, Berkshire, in 1781 and served until 1830, at which time he turned the Headmastership over to his youngest son Francis E. J. Valpy and continued in semi-retirement until his death in 1836. During his tenure as Headmaster of Reading Grammar School for boys over the course of fifty years, he expanded the boarding school and added new buildings. He is the author of numerous published works, including Greek and Latin textbooks, sermons, volumes of poetry, and adaptations of plays such as Shakespeare’s King John and Sheridan’s The Critic. His Elements of Greek Grammar, Elements of Latin Grammar,,Greek Delectus and Latin Delectus, printed and published by his son A. J. Valpy, were all much used as school texts throughout the nineteenth century. Valpy’s students performed his own adaptations of Greek, Latin, and English plays for the triennial visitations and the play receipts went to charitable organizations. Valpy enlisted Mitford to write reviews of the productions for the Reading Mercury. In 1803, his adaptation of Shakespeare’s King John was performed at Covent Garden Theatre. Richard Valpy was married twice and had twelve children, eleven of whom lived to adulthood. His first wife was Martha Cornelia de Cartaret; Richard and Martha were married about 1778 and they had one daughter, Martha Cartaretta Cornelia, born 1779. His first wife Martha died about 1780 and he married Mary Benwell of Caversham, Oxfordshire on May 30, 1782. Together they had six sons and five daughters and ten of their eleven children survived to adulthood. Richard Valpy and Mary Benwell’s sons were Richard Valpy (the fifth of that name), Abraham John Valpy, called John; Gabriel Valpy, Anthony Blagrove Valpy; and Francis Edward Jackson Valpy. His daughters were Mary Ann Catherine Valpy; Sarah Frances Valpy, called "Frances" or "Fanny"; Catherine Elizabeth Blanch Valpy; Penelope Arabella Valpy; and Elizabeth Charlotte Valpy, who died as an infant. Richard Valpy died on March 28, 1836 in Reading, Berkshire, and is buried in All Souls cemetery, Kensal Green, London. Dr. Valpy’s students placed a marble bust of him in St. Lawrence’s church, Reading, Berkshire, after his death. John Opie painted Dr. Valpy’s portrait. See . --#ebb #lmw
. He is a very fine lad, & seems to have that particular turn which makes what is called a great scholar--a thing for which in my own  peculiar opinionmind I have no great veneration [8] The letter skips approximately the middle one-third of the page at this point, to leave blank space for addressing the letter—#kdc inasmuch as the only one of the species whom I have [known] [9] For the next few lines, the words at the end of the line curve into the binding and are difficult to read.—#kdcvery intimately (your friend Mr. BurgessMr. Burgess
A "Mr. Burgess" who recommended a particular volume of Sophocles’ plays to MRM, mentioned in her letter to Talfourd of Nov. 12-13 1821 .--#lmw
) having devoted his whole life to Greek plays certainly does not [understand] the sense & spirit of them so well as I who do not know the Alphabet--But FrederickFrederick Bulley | Born: 1810 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1885-09-03 in Fairford, Gloucestershire, England.
Born in Reading, Berkshire, the third son of John Bulley and Charlotte Pocock. He obtained his BA (1829), MA (1832), BD (1840) and DD (1855) as a member of Magdalen College, University of Oxford. He became President of Magdalen Collegefrom 5 January 1855 until his death. --#kdc #lmw
has that turn--he will [pore] for six hours together over the words of EuripidesEuripides | Born: -0480 in Salamís. Died: -0406 in Macedonia.
Ancient Greek playwright, considered together with Aeschylus and Sophocles as establishing the classical foundation of Western tragedy. Author of Ion (between 414 and 412 BC), on which Thomas Noon Talfourd later based his own play of the same title, as well as Orestes (408 B.C.), and Cyclops (date unknown), the only known complete example of a burlesque satyr play, translated into a satiric poem in 1819 by Percy Shelley . --#ebb #lmw
--& a good fellowship & a  scholarcollege tutorship--OxfordUniversity of Oxford, Oxford, Oxfordshire, England | Oxford University | Oxford | Oxfordshire | England | 51.7566341 -1.2547036999999364 | Research university made up of constituent colleges; the oldest university in the English-speaking world.--#lmw51.7566341 -1.2547036999999364 in [10] The following words are cross-written along the right margin of the 4th page—#kdc be the very place for him--He is a nice boy nevertheless, but not so fine a fellow as RichardsonHenry Kemp Richardson
Coles says this is Henry Kemp Richardson of Reading, see p.471, note 5. One of the 1827 sonnets is address to a Henry Richardson. Needs further research.--#kdc #lmw
the clever & the idle.--I beg ten thousand pardons for this skimble skamble letter--God bless you my dear friend--


Ever your'syours M.R.M.Mary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb


page 5

[11] The following is cross-written across the top of page 1.—#kdcPray [Gap: 1 words, reason: illegible.][was][12] Word is obscured by binding tape—#kdc it Mr. Henry RobinsonHenry Crabb Robinson | Born: 1775 in Bury St. Edmunds, England. Died: 1867.
Lawyer, diarist, and newspaper correspondent for The Times, helped Thomas Noon Talfourd to secure a position with The Times as a legal report correspondent.--#ebb
[13] ColesWilliam Allan Coles
Wrote his PhD Dissertation to the Dept. of English at Harvard University of August 1956 as an edition of the correspondence of Mary Russell Mitford and Thomas Noon Talfourd, representing parts of the collections at the John Rylands Library and the Harvard and Yale special collections. Coles taught at the University of Virginiauntil 1958, when he moved to the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He corresponded extensively with Francis Needhamin the 1950s, during the course of which they exchanged research on contextual information, and shared transcriptions of Mitford’s letters. Some of Coles’s letters are preserved among Needham’s papers, held at the Reading Central Library .--#scw #ebb
claims MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
is probably correct that this is Henry Crabb RobinsonHenry Crabb Robinson | Born: 1775 in Bury St. Edmunds, England. Died: 1867.
Lawyer, diarist, and newspaper correspondent for The Times, helped Thomas Noon Talfourd to secure a position with The Times as a legal report correspondent.--#ebb
, although the record only shows that the attorney was Mr. Robinson. See Coles p. 472, note 13The Correspondence of Mary Russell Mitford and Thomas Noon Talfourd (1821-1825). William Allan Coles. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University. 1956-08.
Coles’ doctoral dissertation presented to the Department of English at Harvard University, an edition of 107 letters between Mary Russell Mitford and Thomas Noon Talfourd written between 1821 and 1825., housed at the John Rylands Library and the Harvard University Library.--#ebb
. Needs additional research.—#kdc #lmw
who lost your [Clients]Client's horse cause at BedfordBedford, Bedfordshire, England | Bedford | Bedfordshire | England | 52.1359729 -0.46665459999996983 | The county town of Bedfordshire, in the east of England. It was founded at a ford on the River Great Ouse.--#lmw52.1359729 -0.46665459999996983--They have put it very maliciously into the Berks ChronicleBerkshire Chronicle.
Newspaper founded in 1825, now known as the Reading Chronicle.--#kdc
& on the eve of an election it had [Gap: 1 words, reason: illegible.][better] not have been tried. The old Clothesman Candidateis off.

To T. N. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
Esqre.
1 Oxford CircuitOxford Circuit | England | Oxford Circuit was one of six assize circuits in England and Wales. Before 1830, the Oxford Circuit consisted of the counties of Oxford, Worcester, Stafford, Salop, Hereford, Monmouth, Gloucester, and Berkshire. Judges were appointed by the monarch and traveled the Circuit twice per year to hear trials of serious crimes. Talfourd was appointed to the Oxford Circuit in 1821. --#kdc