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Letter to Sir William ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
, May 30, 1819

Edited by Lisa M. Wilson.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 6 October 2015. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: DSCF9464.jpg, DSCF9465.jpg, DSCF 9466.jpg, DSCF9467.jpg, DSCF9468.jpg, DSCF9469.jpg, DSCF9470.jpg, DSCF9471.jpg, DSCF9472.jpg, DSCF9473.jpg, DSCF9474.j pg, DSCF9475.jpg, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 371

One and a half leaves of paper, six surfaces photographed. Folded in half, folded again in thirds for sealing. Address leaf bearing black postmark, partially illegible, reading
NEWBURY
.Sheet (pages five and six) torn on edge of page three where wax seal was removed.Red wax seal, complete, wrong side facing, adhered to page six.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
10Bertram HouseBertram House, Berkshire, England | Grazeley | Berkshire | England | | Mansion built by George Mitford for his family residence, begun in April 1802 and completed in June 1804, after tearing down the previous house on the property, Grazeley Court Farm, a farmhouse about three miles outside of Reading, in the hamlet of Grazeley. George Mitford named his new house after a knight from the reign of William the Conqueror, Sir Robert de Bertram, who had married Sibella Mitford, daughter of Sir John de Mitford (source: Vera Watson). This estate signified George Mitford’s status as a land-owning country gentleman. Prior to this time, the Mitford family lived in Alresford and then in Reading. The family removed from Bertram House in April 1820, after financial reverses forced the family to sell the property.--#ebb #lmwMay 30th 1819. To Sir William ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
-->

PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
having made Mr. DundasCharles Dundas, 1st Baron Amesbury , Member of Parliament for Berkshire , or: 1st Baron Amesbury , Member of Parliament for Berkshire | Born: 1751-08-05 in Scotland. Died: 1832-07-07 in Pimlico, England.
Member of Parliament for Berkshire from 1794 to 1832. He generally sided with liberal and refomist policies but was not an active party member. His first wife Anne brought him the estate of Kintbury-Amesbury (or Barton Court) in Berkshire as well as other property. He was also the first chairman of the Kennet and Avon Canal Company; the Dundas Aqueduct was named after him. --#lmw
promise and repromise not to transmogrify you into a lady (or as once before happened you know my dear friend) & I avail myself of his obliging offer to transmit to you "these presents"--indeed I am impatient to thank you again & again for the delightful kindness of your visit, to tell you how deeply we all regarded its shortness, & with how much pleasure we anticipate a visit into DevonshireDevonshire, England | Devon | 50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 | County in the south west of England bordering the English Channel and the Bristol Channel. Now called Devon.--#ebb #lmw50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373--this year. I do hope we shall not be disappointed--only I must try not to set my heart too much on it, for I am unlucky & if I do our plans will be sure to be overturned--I got your kindest of all kind letters Tuesday morning--Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
was still with us having kept prisoner by the loss of her carriage horses which PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
& I by the way, who were obliged to go in our elegant machine ten miles through the rain to a birthday dinner in the good town of WokinghamWokingham, Berkshire, England | Wokingham | Berkshire | England | 51.410457 -0.8338610000000699 | A market town in south east England in Berkshire, near Reading. The Mitfords sometimes travelled to Wokingham on their way to London, or to visit the home of their friends, the Webbs.--#lmw #err51.410457 -0.8338610000000699^ as we were coming home Monday night--so I showed her what you said of her, & she laughed & exclaimed & was very much pleased. She is a most excellent person. I assure you I never yet know any human being so perfectly fine & single minded--of so pure & generous & lofty a spirit. She is compared to the common run of accomplished women what sculpture is to paintings--something real & solid & unadorned. I don't say this because I love her very dearly & because she is unutterably good to me but that is my genuine & impartial opinion as to her literary taste I think as badly as you do--this to say mypage 2
opinion like your Worship's happens to be quite different. I wish you had heard her sing! That is her forte. Such a voice! Such compass! Such power! And as never can happen without power such expression! She will sing the finest highest music of HandelGeorge George Georg Frideric Frederick Friedrich Handel Handel Händel, or: George Frederick Handel , Georg Friedrich Händel | Born: 1685-03-05. Died: 1759-04-14.
Anglo-German composer, influenced by the Italian Baroque. Settled in London in 1712 and became a naturalized British subject in 1727. --#ncl #lmw
, HaydnFranz Joseph Hadyn, or: Joseph Haydn | Born: 1732-04-01 in Rohrau, Austria. Died: 1809-05-31 in Vienna, Austria.
Austrian composer popular in England; he visited London twice in the 1790s and became acquainted with Charles Burney. --#lmw
or MozartJohannes Wolfgang Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Amadeus Mozart Mozart, or: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart | Born: 1756-01-27 in Salzburg, Austria. Died: 1791-12-05 in Prague.
--
with an enunciation of the words as just & as perfect, as true to the letter & of meaning as you or I would give in reading them. Nothing but the perfect ease which results from the certainty of power could enable her to do this--Her voice dances on a rope just as securely as one walks on the ground.--though by the way had she sung in your sublime presence this said voice might have got a tumble--but she is more nervous at times than can be conceived & I have seen her obliged to sit down when singing only two or three intimate friends first & not able even to talk all the rest of the evening. Perhaps my dear Sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
, I have said all this before. You talk sometimes of your repetitions whilst the only one you ever make is that fear of repeating yourself--Now to me nothing is more probable than that I should write over & over again the same thing--living constantly at home--seeing so few people--with so little variety of pursuit of & a happy  facility of forgetting any nonsense I may write the moment I have sent it off--with all these elements of "tautology of sense" as I once absurdly called it--the probability is that I am as great a repeater as RichardsonSamuel Richardson | Born: 1689-08-19 in Mackworth, Derbyshire, England. Died: 1761-07-04 in London, England.
--
& nothing but my having the most indulgent Correspondent in the world & administering my tediousness in distant doses prevents my being turned off like ClarissaClarissa
Title character of Samuel Richardson’s novel Clarissa. Became proverbial for an impossibly perfect ideal woman and used by Mitford in this sense.--#lmw
or Sir Charles Grandison
Title character of Samuel Richardson’s novel The History of Sir Charles Grandison. Became proverbial for an impossibly perfect ideal man and used by Mitford in this sense.--#lmw
Sir Charles Grandison. Having thus apologized for talking of my Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
& telling you what I had probably page 3
told you before I must now talk a little of that very clever very odd man her husband--You would gather from one conversation that Mr. DickinsonCharles Dickinson, or: Mr. Dickinson | Born: 1755-03-06 in Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire, England. Died: 1827 in Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Friend of the Mitford family. Charles Dickinson was born on March 6, 1755 at Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire. He was the son of Vikris Dickinson and Elizabeth Marchant. The Dickinson family were Quakers who lived in the vicinity of Bristol, Gloucestershire. On August 3, 1807, he married Catherine Allingham at St Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived at Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where the Mitfords visited them. Charles Dickinson owned a private press he employed to print literary works by his friends (See letters to Elford from March 13, 1819 and June 21, 1820). Charles Dickinson died at Farley Hill in 1827.--#ajc #lmw
not only translate but is the story of the Translations (in which affair you deserted me very treacherously for you must know that I was right, & must I think have admired a little at the modesty which was proved by a desire to publish these poems with a puffing preface a la Mr. DickinsonCharles Dickinson, or: Mr. Dickinson | Born: 1755-03-06 in Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire, England. Died: 1827 in Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Friend of the Mitford family. Charles Dickinson was born on March 6, 1755 at Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire. He was the son of Vikris Dickinson and Elizabeth Marchant. The Dickinson family were Quakers who lived in the vicinity of Bristol, Gloucestershire. On August 3, 1807, he married Catherine Allingham at St Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived at Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where the Mitfords visited them. Charles Dickinson owned a private press he employed to print literary works by his friends (See letters to Elford from March 13, 1819 and June 21, 1820). Charles Dickinson died at Farley Hill in 1827.--#ajc #lmw
is besides an original Poet (in  that capacity rather baddish) having written an unreadable quarto styled the Travels of CylleniusThe Travels of Cyllenius: A Poem, in 66 cantos. Charles Dickinson . published for the author [Charles Dickinson]. 1795.
First published in 1795 and privately printed by Charles Dickinson himself. Period records suggest that the poem was available in at least four different forms: as individual quarto cantos sold for 1 shilling each (some listing ’White’ as the name of the publisher, although this may be a bookseller); as a 1796 quarto complete edition of all sixty-six cantos; as partial quarto editions of the middle 40 cantos (possibly gathered from individual cantos, as each were numbered separately); and a 12mo. complete edition in two volumes, with 389 pages listed as printed at Farley-Hill in 1820, of which only 12 copies were made and which were presentation copies to Dickinson’s friends. Some editions appear "in boards," others in "half morocco." An auction catalog for Richard Valpy’s library indicates that there were "only 12 copies, printed by the author himself, who presented this to me (ie, Richard Valpy);" another presentation copy appears in an auction catalogs for Samuel Rogers’s library. Periodicals and their reviewers from 1796 do not appear to have had access to the complete work in 66 cantos but instead review partial editions of cantos 41-60 (Edinburgh Magazine); canto 38 only (Analytical Review); Cantos 38-60 (British Critic); Cantos 38 and 40 only (Monthly Review). WorldCat lists an edition of cantos 37 to 60 only from 1795. Separate listings for a two-page mock title-page for the work, attributed to Horne-Took, appear as "Speedily will be published, price 3l.6s. in boards, The travels of Cyllenius: a poem. In sixty-six cantos." --#lmw
--a sort of didactic Epic--a great patriot--quite an Ultra--one of Major CartwrightJohn Cartwright, or: , Royal Navy officer, Major, Nottinghamshire militia | Born: 1740-09-17 in Marnham, Nottinghamshire, England. Died: 1824-09-23 in London, England.
Supported the aims of the American Revolution and radical and reformist causes in Great Britain. Corresponded with Thomas Jefferson. Wrote a pamphlet in 1776 advocating annual parliaments, the secret ballot, and universal manhood suffrage. Founder of the Society for Constutional Information, which developed into the London Corresponding Society. In 1794, was a witness at the "Treason Trials" supporting Horne Took, Thelwall, and Hardy. Also associated with Sir Francis Burdett, William Cobbett, and Francis Place. In 1812, founded the Hampden Clubs, political clubs designed to bring together like-minded middle-class reformers and working-class radicals. Supporter of Thomas Wooler and The Black Dwarf. The Life and Correspondence of Major Cartwright was published in 1826. --#lmw
's disciples (N.B I don't go so far by ten degrees--I am a very moderate person--very moderate indeed--neither Whigthe Whig party nor ToryTory Party
Originally, a 17th-century insulting nickname for those who supported James II’s right to the throne of England, even though he was Catholic. The term connoted "Irish Catholic outlaw." The term was adopted by the party, which became generally affiliated with the interests of the country gentry, Anglicanism, and support of the divine right of kings. The party was loosely affiliated until the late 18th century, when William Pitt the Younger emerged as the leader of a revitalized party. The Conservative Party, founded in 1834 by Sir Robert Peel, absorbed and organized the Tory Party and retained the party nickname. --#kdc
nor Reformer--Nothing but a Buonapartiste--a simple Buonapartiste!)--a very accomplished & eloquent man (though sometimes when one wants him to talk especially in a party he won't say a word--I have seen him sit at the bottom of his own table looking just like a whipt schoolboy) & without any "but" or "though" or any parenthesis or compunction whatever the finest reader of Poetry English French or Italian that I ever heard in my life. To hear him read or recite the finest parts of HamletHamlet. William Shakespeare. LearKing Lear. William Shakespeare. or OthelloOthello. William Shakespeare. is a thousand times better than to see KeanEdmund Kean
English actor (1787-1833). English actor. Considered the greatest actor of his era. Born Westminster, London --#lmw
in them--It realizes the idea one has of GarrickDavid Garrick | Born: 1717-02-19 in Angel Inn, Hereford, Herefordshire, England. Died: 1779-01-20 in Adelphi Buildings, London, England.
English actor and theatrical manager, considered the greatest actor of his era, and advocate of a more naturalistic style of acting. Prominent in Whig circles of the late eighteenth century. Frequently painted by Joshua Reynolds. Mary Robinson was one of his last acting mentees before his retirement from the stage. His greatest contributions as a playwright are his adaptations of Shakespeare for the eighteenth-century stage. He was the first actor to be buried in Westminster Abbey. --#lmw
--the passion is quite aweful. For the rest he is in manner a perfect Gentleman & in mind singularly benevolent & provokingly just, for he will dispute an odd   shilling for twelve good years & make twenty quarrels for twenty pence whilst he would think nothing of giving away a hundred pounds of supporting a dozen poor families--From this clear character you may page 4
gather that he is respected & beloved by the poor & a little shunned by the Gentry--indeed if it were not for his splendid hospitability & his Wife I don't think one of them would go near him. I like him very much & think him the best reader & the best Translator in the world--only I wish he would publish his Translations quietly without wanting me to intermeddle.--Mem: I shan't.--Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
was delighted with your promise to read CamillaCamilla, or a Picture of Young Lady. Frances Burney . London: Payne Cadell and Davies. 1796. --I don't much think you will find Mr. Edgar MandlebertMr. Edgar Mandlebert
Character in Camilla; Mitford says of this character that "the very name is as stiff as poker," in a letter to Elford from 30 May 1819.--#lmw
(the very name is as stiff as poker) improve on acquaintance--the only persons in that book who much delighted me, were CamillaCamilla
Title character in Camilla; Mitford admires Burney’s characterization of her in her a letter to Elford from 30 May 1819.--#lmw
herself Mr. DubsterCamilla
Character in Camilla; Mitford admires Burney’s characterization of him in her a letter to Elford from 30 May 1819.--#lmw
, & Sir HughCamilla
Character in Camilla; Mitford admires Burney’s characterization of him in her a letter to Elford from 30 May 1819.--#lmw
--that delightful Sir HughCamilla
Character in Camilla; Mitford admires Burney’s characterization of him in her a letter to Elford from 30 May 1819.--#lmw
! And they are precisely I believe the three whom Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
would if she could leave out--at least she skips them--just as she does Mr. DexterMr. Dexter
A character in Lady Morgan’s novel The O’Donnel’s.--#lmw
& Lady SingletonLady Singleton
A character in Lady Morgan’s novel The O’Donnel’s.--#lmw
in ODonnelO’Donnel: A National Tale. Sydney Owenson. Sydney Owenson Lady Morgan . London: Henry Colburn. 1814. . But I always thought poor CamillaCamilla
Title character in Camilla; Mitford admires Burney’s characterization of her in her a letter to Elford from 30 May 1819.--#lmw
's fate so terrible in being joined to that man, that I had hardly patience to read the rest of the book--And to confess to you a truth (which may I believe be more safely said now than it might have been twenty years ago) I do not think very highly of any of Madame D'ArblayFrances d’Arblay, or: Madamed’Arblay | Born: 1752-06-13 in King’s Lynn, England. Died: 1840-01-06 in London, England.
--
's books. The style is so strutting--she does so stalk about on Dr. JohnsonSamuel Johnson | Born: 1709-08-18. Died: 1784-12-13.
English writer and "man of letters." His many well-known works include best A Dictionary of the English Language (1755), Lives of the Most Eminent English Poets (1781), and A Journey to the Western Islands of Scotland (1775).--#esh
's old stilts. What she says wants so much translating into common English & when translated would seem so commonplace, that I have always felt strongly tempted to read all the serious parts with my finger's ends. Comedy is her strong side or rather farce--her Mr. SmithMr. Smith
Character in Evelina; Mitford admires Burney’s characterization of him in her a letter to Elford from 30 May 1819.--#lmw
& Miss BranghtonMiss Branghton
Character in Evelina; Mitford admires Burney’s characterization of him in her a letter to Elford from 30 May 1819.--#lmw
, Mr. DubsterCamilla
Character in Camilla; Mitford admires Burney’s characterization of him in her a letter to Elford from 30 May 1819.--#lmw
& Mr. BriggsMr. Briggs
Character in Fanny Burney’s Cecilia .--#lmw
are as good as any characters can be which appear   always to exemplify one unmixed quality--they are personifications of coxcombry vulgarity & avarice ^& are compared to the mixed characters the human beings of Miss AustenJane Austen | Born: 1775-12-16 in Steventon, Hampshire, England. Died: 1817-07-18 in Winchester, Hampshire, England.
Novelist celebrated for her wit and style, whose works investigated women’s social and economic vulnerabilities in English society. During her lifetime she published Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814), and Emma (1815), all anonymously. Northanger Abbey, the first written of her novels (composed in 1798-1799) was published posthumously in 1818 along with her last finished novel, Persuasion. Mitford claims in a letter to Sir William Elford of 3 April 1815 that she has recently discovered Austen "is my countrywoman,", that is, a neighbor. Later in a letter of 2 July 1816 praised Emma in particular among Austen’s novels. She and Elford evidently knew the identity of Austen as the author long before the information was public knowledge, and she claims in the April 3 letter that her mother remembered Jane Austen in her youth as "the prettiest, silliest, most affected, husband-hunting butterfly she ever remembers", but that Jane was by the 1810s extremely quiet, which impressed Mitford: "till Pride and Prejudice showed what a precious gem was hidden in that unbending case, she was no more regarded in society than a poker or a fire-screen, or any other thin upright piece of wood or iron that fills its corner in peace and quietness. The case is very different now; she is still a poker--but a poker of whom every one is afraid. It must be confessed that this silent observation from such an observer is rather formidable. Most writers are good-humoured chatterers--neither very wise nor very witty:--but nine times out of ten (at least in the few that I have known) unaffected and pleasant, and quite removing by their conversation any awe that may have been excited by their works. But a wit, a delineator of character, who does not talk, is terrific indeed!" Source: L’Estrange. --#ebb
--something like the comedy of humours introduced by Ben JonsonBenjamin Jonson | Born: 1572-06-11. Died: 1637-08-06 in London.
Renaissance English playwright and contemporary of William Shakespeare. Jonson was known for satirical plays, including Every Man in His Humour (1598), Volpone, or The Foxe (1605), and The Alchemist (1610).--#ebb
in opposition to the Comedy of nature which ShakespeareWilliam Shakespeare | Born: 1564-04 in Stratford upon Avon. Died: 1616-04-23 in Stratford upon Avon.
English author and actor (1564-1616) --#lmw
wrote probably unconsciously--or as a picture would be composed of unmixed colours, by the side page 5
of one where the tints were properly blended.--Pray forgive this critique--written with even more than usual puzzleheadedness--thought upon paper isntead of being considered in the addled brains of  theyour poor little correspondent--& sent to you with the confident carelessness which your too great goodness has encouraged.

Lady Pitt's death has added a thousand a year to the Duke of WellingtonArthur Wellesley, Field Marshal, First Duke of Wellington , Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830, and again in 1834 , or: The Iron Duke | Born: 1769-05-01 in Dublin, Ireland. Died: 1852-09-14 in Walmer, Kent.
Before his fame in the Napoleonic Wars, Wellesley served in the Irish House of Commons, and after fighting against Tipu Sultan, the "Tiger of Mysore" in the Siege of Seringapatam he served as the governor of Seringapatam and Mysore in 1799. He was promoted to general during the Peninsular Wars against Napoleon (the battles fought in the Iberian Peninsula), and was granted the title, the First Duke of Wellingto, after Napoleon’s first defeat and exile in 1814. He led the Allied English and European armies in Napoleon’s decisive defeat at Waterloo on 18 June 1815 . A prominent influence on the Tory party, he served as Prime Minister from 1828 to 1830, and again in 1834 . --#ebb
's new estate[1] George Pitt, 2nd Baron Rivers sold this portion of his estates (Stratfield Saye) in 1818 to the crown, in order that the crown could award them to the Duke of Wellington.—#lmw. This great Captain of ours is a prodigiously lucky man. Besides the property he gets a very pretty place, finely situated--If he should build he will probably live in that house till his palace is completed. You did not leave me the four landmarks you promised--You must send them to me in your next.

I am going this week (unless it should be good enough to rain which seems likely) To a great Christening twenty mi[Gap: 3 chars, reason: torn.][les] off in OxfordshireOxfordshire, England | Oxfordshire | England | 51.7612056 -1.2464674000000286 | A county in south east England. Location of Oxford University and Blenheim Palace.--#lmw51.7612056 -1.2464674000000286--a very shocking prospect--Christen[Gap: 4 chars, reason: torn.][ings] & weddings & such like things are always bad enough e[Gap: 3 chars, reason: torn.][spe]cially where there are dozens of Uncles & Aunts, & Grandfathers &Grandmothers & Brothers & Sisters ^& Nephews & Nieces to all eternity--but in addition to this tremendous family congregation there is a quarrel to be made up metamark rend="caret" place="below"/>a quarrel about nothing between two old Dons & there will be crying & all the of a Scene--always a shocking thing to me who can't cry & am sometimes apt to laugh. PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
is Godfather & will take me because they are civil enough to make a fuss--but I intend to get out of it if I can--I should take up more room than they can spare, unless the young ladies lay in Strata as Tom Crib says--& moreover I am quite sure that with one horse & the tackle & OxfordshireOxfordshire, England | Oxfordshire | England | 51.7612056 -1.2464674000000286 | A county in south east England. Location of Oxford University and Blenheim Palace.--#lmw51.7612056 -1.2464674000000286 hills &page 6
OxfordshireOxfordshire, England | Oxfordshire | England | 51.7612056 -1.2464674000000286 | A county in south east England. Location of Oxford University and Blenheim Palace.--#lmw51.7612056 -1.2464674000000286 roads we never should arrive there altogether--Of a certainty some at least of the heavy baggage--I perhaps & my old Chum PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
's box Coat should be left midway. But I think it will rain--& so make sure we have begun mowing--Adieu, my dear Friend--PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
& MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
send their kindest regards & MossyMossy
Mitford’s dog; He died on Saturday, August 21, 1819 at Bertram House. "Mossy" was a nickname for "Moss Trooper."--#lmw #ncl
his duty--poor MossyMossy
Mitford’s dog; He died on Saturday, August 21, 1819 at Bertram House. "Mossy" was a nickname for "Moss Trooper."--#lmw #ncl
he missed you very much at breakfast next morning--your mode of education was quite to his taste--& to mine--I love to see MossyMossy
Mitford’s dog; He died on Saturday, August 21, 1819 at Bertram House. "Mossy" was a nickname for "Moss Trooper."--#lmw #ncl
fed--Adieu--God bless you--

Ever most affectionately your'syours
M.R. MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
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NewburyNewbury, Berkshire, England | Newbury | Berkshire | England | 51.401409 -1.323113899999953 | Market town on the River Kennet in Berkshire. Horseracing took place between 1805 and 1811 at the Newbury Races, although the current racecourse did not come into existence until 1905.--#ebb #lmw51.401409 -1.323113899999953First June 1819

C DundasCharles Dundas, 1st Baron Amesbury , Member of Parliament for Berkshire , or: 1st Baron Amesbury , Member of Parliament for Berkshire | Born: 1751-08-05 in Scotland. Died: 1832-07-07 in Pimlico, England.
Member of Parliament for Berkshire from 1794 to 1832. He generally sided with liberal and refomist policies but was not an active party member. His first wife Anne brought him the estate of Kintbury-Amesbury (or Barton Court) in Berkshire as well as other property. He was also the first chairman of the Kennet and Avon Canal Company; the Dundas Aqueduct was named after him. --#lmw


Sir Wm Elford BartWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw


BickhamBickham, Somerset, England | Bickham | Somerset | England | 51.163534 -3.506621999999993 | Hamlet near Plymouth, and residence of Sir William Elford, who lived there until the failure of his finances in 1825 forced him eventually to sell his family’s estate. He sold his property in Bickham in 1831 and moved to The Priory, in Totnes, Devon the house of his daughter (Elizabeth) and son-in-law.--#ebb #lmw51.163534 -3.506621999999993

PlymouthPlymouth, Devonshire, England | Plymouth | Devonshire | England | 50.3754565 -4.14265649999993 | City on the coast of Devonshire. After declines in the seventeenth century, increasingly important from the late eighteenth century into the nineteenth as a seaport, site of trade and emigration to and from the Americas, and a center of shipbuilding. Birthplace of Benjamin Robert Haydon. Sir William Elford was also born nearby at Bickham. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, from its founding in 1782, and he was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth and served from 1796 to 1806.--#ebb #lmw50.3754565 -4.14265649999993