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Letter to Sir William ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
,January 24, 1820

Edited by Samantha Webb .

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: February 1, 2017. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: P1020356.jpg, P1020357.jpg, P1020358.jpg, P1020359.jpg, P1020360.jpg, P1020361.jpg, P1020362.jpg, P1020363.jpg, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--
.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 373

There are two pages of paper that are 23 cm long, four page surfaces photographed. The pages are folded in half lengthwise and in thirds for posting. A black circular mileage stamp reading READING
gap quantity="1" unit="chars" reason="illegible"/> has been stamped by the postal service across the address leaf. Sheet pages three and four torn on right edge of page three where wax seal was removed. Red wax seal, complete, adhered to the center of page surface four

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
Bertram House, Berkshire, England | Grazeley | Berkshire | England | | Mansion built by George Mitford for his family residence, begun in April 1802 and completed in June 1804, after tearing down the previous house on the property, Grazeley Court Farm, a farmhouse about three miles outside of Reading, in the hamlet of Grazeley. George Mitford named his new house after a knight from the reign of William the Conqueror, Sir Robert de Bertram, who had married Sibella Mitford, daughter of Sir John de Mitford (source: Vera Watson). This estate signified George Mitford’s status as a land-owning country gentleman. Prior to this time, the Mitford family lived in Alresford and then in Reading. The family removed from Bertram House in April 1820, after financial reverses forced the family to sell the property.--#ebb #lmw Jany 24th1820. To Sir W. ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw

It hails & rains & blows & thaws--so that I cannot walk--It's so dark that I cannot see to work--I got tipsy with green tea last night & could not sleep, so that I have the headach & am stupid & can't understand what I read--all these are valid reasons for writing to you my dear friendWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
--more especially when reinforced with the fear of not leaving till I have written--are they not?--So write I shall, & plunge at once into my letter as one does into a [Gap: 1 word, reason: illegible.][tubbath]--Here goes. Have you read IvanhoeIvanhoe. Walter Scott. ? Do you like it? What a silly question, What two silly questions! You must have read & you must have liked that most gorgeous & magnificent Tale of ChivalryIvanhoe--I know nothing so rich, so splendid, so profuse--so like old painted glass or a Gothic chapel full of shrines & banners & knightly monuments--The soul too which is sometimes wanting is there in its full glory of passion & tenderness--RebeccaRebecca
character in Ivanhoe.--#esh
is such a woman as FletcherJohn Fletcher | Born: 1579 in Rye, Sussex. Died: 1625 in London, England.
Playwright following Shakespeare and contemporary of Ben Jonson in the early 17th century, and collaborator with Francis Beaumont. --#ebb
used to draw--an AspasiaAspatia
character in The Maid’s Tale.--#esh
--a BellarioBellario (Euphrasia)
character in Philaster.--#esh
--There are faults to be sure in plenty if one had a mind to hunt after them--that horrible old woman-- (an old crone is a necessity to W. ScottWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
--he is literally hag ridden) that vapid heroineRebecca
character in Ivanhoe.--#esh
(the only comfort is that heWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
leaves his readers with a consoling assurance that the hero likes the sweet JewessRebecca
character in Ivanhoe.--#esh
best)--the melodramatic air--by which one feels almost as if it were written for the accomodation of the artists of the Coburg & the Surrey theaters with a Tournament in   Act the First--a burning castle in act the second--a trial by combat in act the third--nothing for the dramatist to do but to cut out the speeches & there is a grand spectacle ready made--Then neither RichardRichard I , King of England, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Anjou
English monarch (1157-1199). House of Plantaganet. Son of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Also known as Richard Coeur de Lion or Richard the Lionhart. --#lmw
nor Robin page 2
Hood scarcely comes up to one's notions of the lion hearted kingRichard I , King of England, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Count of Anjou
English monarch (1157-1199). House of Plantaganet. Son of Henry II of England and Eleanor of Aquitaine. Also known as Richard Coeur de Lion or Richard the Lionhart. --#lmw
whose name the Saracen women used to still their screaming children or the bold outlaw whom the fine Ballads in Percy's ReliquesReliques of Ancient English Poetry, consisting of Old Heroic Ballads, Songs, and other Pieces of our Earlier Poets, Together with Some of Later Date. Thomas Percy . London: J. Dodsley. 1765. & Ben JonsonBenjamin Jonson | Born: 1572-06-11. Died: 1637-08-06 in London.
Renaissance English playwright and contemporary of William Shakespeare. Jonson was known for satirical plays, including Every Man in His Humour (1598), Volpone, or The Foxe (1605), and The Alchemist (1610).--#ebb
's still finer pastoral (Did you even read that beautiful unfinished drama--The Sad ShepherdThe Sad Shepherd: Or, A Tale of Robin Hood, a Fragment. Ben Jonson .
Appeared in this form in 1783, edited by Francis Godolphin Waldron and Peter Whalley.--#lmw
?) have made one of the chartered denizens of one's fancy--But there is no finding fault with a book which puts one so much in mind of FroissartJean Froissart, canon of Chimay, France, or: canon of Chimay, France | Born: 1337 in Valenciennes, County of Hainaut, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1405 in France.
--
--IvanhoeIvanhoe. Walter Scott. is more like him than any thing which has been written these three centuries.--I have just finished Mr. Hallam's View of Europe During the Middle Ages--a very masterly work in its way, which confirms exactly to W. ScottWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
's view of manners particularly the terrible vices of the higher orders & clergy--& puts one in mind of FroissartJean Froissart, canon of Chimay, France, or: canon of Chimay, France | Born: 1337 in Valenciennes, County of Hainaut, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1405 in France.
--
in a different way from IvanhoeIvanhoe. Walter Scott. by making one long every moment for hisJean Froissart, canon of Chimay, France, or: canon of Chimay, France | Born: 1337 in Valenciennes, County of Hainaut, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1405 in France.
--
picturesque minuteness instead of the large views & sweeping generalities of the authorWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
. I don't like philosophical historians who make wise remarks & write fine dissertations--Do you? Live for ever the [Gap: 1 word, reason: illegible.][Barrets] & Clarendons! Delightful sellers of what they [Gap: 1 word, reason: illegible.][saw]! -- One page of that narrative is worth whole volumes of disquisition. -- I am now reading Petrarque et Laure -- the last of Madame de Genlis'Stéphanie Félicité du Crest de Saint-Aubin, or: Comtesse de Genlis, Madame de Genlis | Born: 1746-01-25 in Issy-l’Évêque, Saône-et-Loire, France. Died: 1830-12-30.
--
last words (I believe she has already taken leave of the public & times in [Gap: 1 word, reason: illegible.][town]) --I don't like Madame de GenlisStéphanie Félicité du Crest de Saint-Aubin, or: Comtesse de Genlis, Madame de Genlis | Born: 1746-01-25 in Issy-l’Évêque, Saône-et-Loire, France. Died: 1830-12-30.
--
--I don't like PetrarchFrancesco Petrarca, or: Petrarch | Born: 1304-07-20 in Arezzo, Republic of Florence. Died: 1374-07-19 in Arquà, Republic of Venice.
Petrarch’s scholarship and poetry helped to initiate the Italian Renaissance. He investigated the learning of ancient Rome and rediscovered Cicero’s letters. In poetry he is most widely known for his sonnet cycle to an idealized woman, Laura. He was a friend of Cola di Rienzo.--#ebb
whose concetti do not appear to me redeemed by any truth of feeling either in love or poetry--> I don't believe in spite of all the prosers & poetisers, L'Abbe de Sade & Lord Woodhouselee included who have about Laura--I don't believe in her--I have no notion that there ever was such a person--I hold her to be not a mistress but a muse--With all these mislikings to my authorStéphanie Félicité du Crest de Saint-Aubin, or: Comtesse de Genlis, Madame de Genlis | Born: 1746-01-25 in Issy-l’Évêque, Saône-et-Loire, France. Died: 1830-12-30.
--
& her heroFrancesco Petrarca, or: Petrarch | Born: 1304-07-20 in Arezzo, Republic of Florence. Died: 1374-07-19 in Arquà, Republic of Venice.
Petrarch’s scholarship and poetry helped to initiate the Italian Renaissance. He investigated the learning of ancient Rome and rediscovered Cicero’s letters. In poetry he is most widely known for his sonnet cycle to an idealized woman, Laura. He was a friend of Cola di Rienzo.--#ebb
& heroine I still read on seduced by Madame GenlisStéphanie Félicité du Crest de Saint-Aubin, or: Comtesse de Genlis, Madame de Genlis | Born: 1746-01-25 in Issy-l’Évêque, Saône-et-Loire, France. Died: 1830-12-30.
--
' enchanting style -- herStéphanie Félicité du Crest de Saint-Aubin, or: Comtesse de Genlis, Madame de Genlis | Born: 1746-01-25 in Issy-l’Évêque, Saône-et-Loire, France. Died: 1830-12-30.
--
"perfect mastery of her weapon which is language".--Now that I am talking of novels--did I ever recommend to you one which is mentioned in the preface to IvanhoeIvanhoe. Walter Scott. page 3
Queenhoo Hallby the late Mr. Strutt--If you could endure the old words you would like it--the comic part is excellent--it has much of the freshness & jollity of Gammer Gurton's NeedleGammer Gurton’s Needle.
Comic play written during the 1550s, considered one of the first comedies in English. Published anonymously, authorship is now likely attributed to William Stevenson (1530–1575).--#lmw
--which you know or perhaps you don't know, for I believe my dear friend you are an [Gap: 1 word, reason: illegible.] anti-antiquarian, is one of the finest coarse comedies in the world.

Have you tried this Lithography? My friend Mr. HoflandThomas Christopher Hofland | Born: 1777-12-25 in Nottinghamshire. Died: 1843-01-03 in Leamington Spa.
Landscape painter, and second husband of the author Barbara Hofland.--#ebb
is working away at it with great zeal & has produced some very beautiful specimens--a nice invention is it not? So direct & easy a medium of multipling the ideas of a great artist without their being chilled & spoilt by passing through other hands--Better because less difficult than the dry needle. And yet what glorious things fine etchings are! Mr. DickinsonCharles Dickinson, or: Mr. Dickinson | Born: 1755-03-06 in Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire, England. Died: 1827 in Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Friend of the Mitford family. Charles Dickinson was born on March 6, 1755 at Pickwick Lodge, Corsham, Wiltshire. He was the son of Vikris Dickinson and Elizabeth Marchant. The Dickinson family were Quakers who lived in the vicinity of Bristol, Gloucestershire. On August 3, 1807, he married Catherine Allingham at St Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived at Farley Hill, near Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where the Mitfords visited them. Charles Dickinson owned a private press he employed to print literary works by his friends (See letters to Elford from March 13, 1819 and June 21, 1820). Charles Dickinson died at Farley Hill in 1827.--#ajc #lmw
has a very good collection & I have been looking at them half last week for when I once had them I could hardly part with them again--Though I have not served him as his friend   Bishop of F[1] The "F" is in grey pencil.—#SMPSalisburyJohn Fisher, or: Bishop of Exeter, Bishop of Salisbury | Born: 1748. Died: 1825-05-08.
Bishop of Exeter and then Bishop of Salisbury from 1807-1825. Art collector and patron of John Constable. --#lmw
who naturally filched half a dozen of his best Boths [2] I am unsure whether this is talking about Andries Both or Jan Both.—#SMP & Salvato[Gap: 1 chars, reason: torn.][r] Rosas & Castigliones! Abstracted them!--borrowed them for a d[Gap: 2 chars, reason: torn.][ay] & never returned one of them! Glorious things they are to be sure--it was a temptation--Vandyke's who darts the needle with much [Gap: 1 word, reason: illegible.] into the copper --RembrandtRembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn | Born: 1606-07-15 in Leiden, Netherlands. Died: 1669-10-04 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Famous Dutch Golden Age painter and printmaker. A prolific painter and printmaker, Rembrandt is usually regarded as the greatest artist of the Netherlands’ Golden Age. Best known for his portraits in oil, particularly his many self-portraits, he also painted landscapes and narratives, including biblical and mythological scenes. He was also a skilled printmaker, employing etching as well as dry point techniques. See The Met’s Rembrandt site at . --#hbl #lmw #ebb
's so full of life & meaning--Daniel [Gap: 1 word, reason: illegible.][de Monssier's]--that brotherJonathan Elford, Member of Parliament for Westbury, or: Member of Parliament for Westbury | Born: 1776-11-05 in Plympton Erle, Plymouth, Devon, England. Died: 1823-03-11 in Upland, Tamerton Foliott, Plymouth, Devon, England.
The only son of Sir William Elford and his first wife Mary Davies Elford. He joined Oriel College, Oxford on June 3, 1795 and later moved to Tamerton Folliot, Devon on an estate he called Upland. He served as a Captain in the South Devonshire militia from 1803 with his father, who was also an officer. On May 10, 1810, he married Charlotte Wynne . He also became a freeman for Plymouth in 1810. Throughout his adulthood, his father tried unsuccessfully to secure him a position within the government. He served briefly as Member of Parliament for Westbury from March 10 to November 29, 1820, a seat he secured under the patronage of Sir Manasseh Masseh Lopes. At this time, Westbury was a controversial "rotten borough" whose interest Lopes had purchased from Lord Abingdon, and Jonathan Elford secured the position likely in the place of Lopes who was serving a prison sentence for electoral corruption. When the sentence was lifted, Elford resigned his seat in November 1820 so Lopes could return. His death at the age of 46 left Sir William without an heir and his debts contributed to his father’s financial collapse in 1825. --#kab #ebb #lmw
amateur of your's whom few artists can match--Ruysdael's which breathe the very soul of landscape--Waterloo's whose wood scenes are such real forests--as sylvan as "As you like it"--& my favorite of all the delicate airy tasteful Weirotter-- If I had been inclined to thieving I certainly should have taken one of those tiny Weirotters--His etchings seem made in Fairyland--Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: . Died: .
Catherine Allingham was born about 1787 in Middlesex, the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford’s February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. She died on September 2, 1861 at St. Marylebone, Middlesex. Source: L’Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
enquires much after you--She is not put to bed yet & continues quite well.--

Pray is the Duke of Kent dead yet? I suppose I shall know tomorrow--but I want to know now--it would be very good in you to send one of the [Gap: 1 word, reason: illegible.][fairies] you keep in pay to tell me--I want to know very much--Now don't fancy it's page 4
only on account of crape & bombazine & broad hemmed piles though to be sure it will add very much to my grief to be obliged to buy a new gown & I can't do without one--but really one has a respect for the Duke of Kent--there is something of his old & venerable FatherGeorge William Frederick , King of Great Britain and King of Ireland , King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland | Born: 1738-06-04 in Norfolk House, St. James’s Square, London, England. Died: 1820-01-29 in Windsor Castle, Windsor, England.
The king who lost the American colonies, and suffered porphyria adn mental illness in the 1810s, when his son, the future King George IV reigned in his stead as the Prince Regent. King George III’s role changed after the Act of Union between England and Ireland in 1801. --#ebb
about him--his talents too were certainly considerable--a fine public speaker-- a [charitable] man--in short between my loyal feelings & my desire not to be obliged to buy a new gown, I am very anxious for his recovery. Now my dear Sir WilliamWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
I am afraid of not getting a frank--so you shall be let off with a single letter. A piece of good forturne which very seldom befalls you!--Adieu my dear friend--pray write soon --

PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
& MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
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M R. MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
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