Maintained by: Elisa E. Beshero-Bondar (ebb8 at pitt.edu) Creative Commons LicenseLast modified: 2018-11-17T07:40:19.349Z

Our default is the Diplomatic view.
Click to toggle the Normalized view
(shows conventional spellings;
hides pagebreaks, insertion marks, and deletions):

Letter to B.R. HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, 1820 September 1

Edited by Elizabeth Raisanen.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 12 October 2015. P5. . 1Sept1820BRHaydon1#.JPG, 1Sept1820BRHaydon2#.JPG, 1Sept1820BRHaydon3#.JPG, 1Sept1820BRHaydon4#.JPG, 1Sept1820BRHaydon5#.JPG, 1Sept1820BRHaydon6#.JPG, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2015.

Reproduced by courtesy of the The Reading Central Library.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: The Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT

One quarto sheet of paper folded in half to form two octavo pages, which comprise pages 1-4 of the letter. The fifth page bears the end of the letter one side, and (after being folded into four panels) exposes the address on the other side.Address leaf bearing the following postmarks: 1) black elliptical Receiving House stamp[Reading]


2) Sepia-colored oval stamp that is split in two, appearing at opposite ends of the address leaf page (the seal was divided after the letter was opened). The top half of the stamp reads as follows: 10 o' Cl The bottom half of the stamp is nearly illegible:
Red wax seal.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
To B.R. Haydon EsqrBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
15Three Mile CrossSeptr 1st 1820. My dear Sir

You are a thousand times too kind in sending Ms. WebbEliza Elizabeth Webb | Born: . Died: .
Elizabeth Webb, called "Eliza," was a neighbor and friend of Mary Russell Mitford. Eliza Webb was born about 1797, the youngest daughter of James Webb, Esq., and Jane Elizabeth Ogbourn. She was baptized privately on March 3, 1797, and publicly on June 8, 1797 in Wokingham, Berkshire. She is the sister of Mary Elizabeth and Jane Eleanor Webb. In 1837 she married Henry Walters, Esq., in Wokingham, Berkshire. In Needham’s papers, he notes from the Berkshire Directorythat she lived on Broad street, presumably in Wokingham. Her date of death is unknown. She died after 1822, at which date she is mentioned in papers relating to her father’s will and estate. Source: See Needham’s letter to Roberts on November 27, 1953 . More research needed.--#scw #lmw
another puppy--I had not heard of it till I got your letter, not having been at WokinghamWokingham, Berkshire, England | Wokingham | Berkshire | England | 51.410457 -0.8338610000000699 | A market town in south east England in Berkshire, near Reading. The Mitfords sometimes travelled to Wokingham on their way to London, or to visit the home of their friends, the Webbs.--#lmw #err51.410457 -0.8338610000000699 myself since I met my FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
there on his return from LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223, & having unluckily been out when Miss Webb called on me last week. But I am sure our good friend will feel your kindness as gratefully as we do. The poor little puppy was certainly dead--PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
saw it quite stiff in the bottom of the basket having waited himself the coming in of the coach. It often happens--they are very delicate & bear travelling worse than any thing. I had half a mind not to tell you, for I was sure you would be sorry--& I am afraid I wrote with great [impatience] for I wrote in such a hurry & the friend who was to take the [hose] standing by me [hat] in hand & looking page 2
as if he thought every instant an hour. Pray forgive me if I seemed abrupt or ungrateful--you must know I could not mean it. Our little lady is a perfect beauty--she is gone out to keep at a farmhouse--Do not forget to pick out a pretty name for her--She must be of your naming--& shall always be yours whenever you want her I have no doubt of her being capital.--My dear Mr. HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
your letter went to my very heart--It does one harm to think of those cold proud selfish Patrons--as they call themselves--It lessens one's faith in human nature. But the Picture will tell--it must--The same heartless vanity which prevents their co-operating in your liberal  &delicate & unostentatious plan, will induce one of them to possess himself of their glorious work of art--I am persuaded of this. But it is heart-breaking to think that you in the meantime should be exposed to these petty cares, & harassed by doubt & vexation--you who ought to be lifted above all wordly care & to live amongst the delightful page 3
creations of your own genious. The only consolation is your elastic & buoyant spirit, which will bear you through all these trials to the prosperity you so well deserve. Fame you have already--a better & a purer fame than any living man--& competence will follow--I am sure of it--Riches you do not want--with such reputation they are not wanted. In the meantime, my dear SirBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, be careful of your invaluable health--& your eyes, your poor eyes as you call them--to what complaint are they liable? Who that looked at them could fancy them subject to any!--Never apologiseapologize to me for talking of yourself. It is a compliment of the highest kind--It tells me that you confide in my sympathy. Be assured you may--except my own dear family & Dear Miss JamesElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
there is no one whom I regard with such admiring & respectful interest or of whose kindness I am half so proud.

So you are not a Queen'sCaroline Queen Consort of the United Kingdom Caroline of Brunswick Caroline Amelia Elizabeth of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel Princess of Wales | Born: 1768-05-17 in Brunswick, Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empire. Died: 1821-08-07 in Hammersmith, London, England.
The cousin and estranged wife of the Prince Regent (later George IV). Caroline was adopted as the leader of the parliamentary reform movement around the time that the Regent attempted to divorce her on grounds of adultery in 1818, and his struggles with Parliament to divorce her and prevent her from becoming Queen are known as the Queen Caroline Affair. --#lmw #ebb
Man! How glad I am to hear it! You have no notion of the height to which this Queen fever page 4
has risen here. I am shocked & disquieted at its terrible effect on conversation. Why should people talk of such a subject? Why should they contaminate their minds by looking for an instant at such trash to settle whether a woman, whom all the world allows to be immodest, be more or less bad? There are no degrees of [comparison in her] chastity in my opinion--but all the ladies here (always excepting my own dear MotherMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
) call me prudish old maidish I [much amiable] & read & talk on. Besides being jealous of the hitherto unstained purity of the English female character, I have another cause of grievance in the abominable [role] which my friends the Reformers have made of this bad woman. To rally the good cause by such an Ally! As to the ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 address, am not at all astonished--ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 is in a perpetual state of effervescence--a bottle of ginger beer in hot weather--bouncing & frothy & flying in every body's face--but that Sir Francis BurdettFrancis Burdett, Sir, 5th Baronet of Bramcote, member of Parliament | Born: 1770-01-25 in Foremarke Hall, Derbyshire, England. Died: 1844-01-23 in St. James’s Place, London, England.
Famous, frequently caricatured Radical and reformist politician, and member of Parliament. Gave many public speeches, protested abuse of prisoners and flogging of soldiers. His harsh critique of the House of Commons for excluding reporters from their debates led to the Commons voting to imprison Burdett in the Tower of London in 1810, where he was committed until June after clashes between crowds of Burdett’s supporters and the army in London. The incident increased his popularity. Burdett introduced a parliamentary reform bill in 1818, condemned the Peterloo Massacre in 1820, and remained politically active into the 1830s. Source: ODNB. --#ebb
& Mr. HobhouseJohn Cam Hobhouse, or: 1st Baron Broughton | Born: 1786-06-27 in Redland, England. Died: 1869-06-03 in Berkeley Square, London, England.
A friend and traveling companion of Lord Byron who contributed notes to the fourth canto of Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, John Cam Hobhouse was elected to the House of Commons in 1820 as a member of the Whig party. In 1851, he became the First Baron Broughton. --#err #lmw
should lend themselves to such mischievous wickedness is really astounding.--Yes page 5
ShakespeareWilliam Shakespeare | Born: 1564-04 in Stratford upon Avon. Died: 1616-04-23 in Stratford upon Avon.
English author and actor (1564-1616) --#lmw
knew the Mob most thoroughly--Is it not the most astonishing of all his astonishing qualities that with so deep an insight into the weakness & the wickedness of human nature he should yet have regarded it with so intense & indulgent a love? There is some soul of goodness in things evil[1] Here, Mitford quotes a line from King Henry's opening monologue in Act IV, scene i of Shakespeare's Henry V.—#errmight be his motto.

I am engaged in a job just now compared to which the water-pitcherings of the Danaides
In Greek mythology, the fifty daughters of Danaus. They are to condemned to spend eternity carrying water in leaky vessel or sieve, and so become proverbial for an impossible task that cannot be completed.--#lmw
were hopeful. I am persuading PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
to be good & take care of himself & keep quiet & go to the sea & get well. I might as well talk to the wind. He has an unpleasant infection on his legs--I think erysipelas [2] Erysipelas is a bacterial infection. Symptoms include fever and raised red patches on the skin.—#errthough he will not allow it--for which all our medical friends advise the warm sea bath--& he could go to SouthhamptonSouthhampton, Hampshire, England | Southampton | Hampshire | England | 50.90970040000001 -1.404350900000054 | Southampton is a major port city in the county of Hampshire on the south coast of England, near the New Forest.--#lmw50.90970040000001 -1.404350900000054 in a day--leave MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
at WinchesterWinchester, Hampshire, England | Winchester | Hampshire | England | 51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 | City and county town of Hampshire. Site of Winchester Cathedral and Winchester College, one of the oldest public grammar schools. Jane Austen died here and is buried in the Cathedral. John Keats wrote several of his best-known poems while on a visit to the city.--#lmw51.059771 -1.3101420000000417 where she has an engagement, & I would stay & keep house here & he might come back to me in a fortnight fresh & well--& he will not go. Is not this very naughty? How he stays--walking ten miles a day & [getting to every house]. I wonder what he would say if I were to behave so!---He desires his best & kindest remembrances to you nevertheless--& so does MamaMary Russell Mitford, or: Mrs. Mitford | Born: 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire, England. Died: 1830-01-02 in Three Mile Cross, parish of Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
Mary Russell was the youngest child of the Rev. Dr. Richard Russell and his second wife, Mary Dicker; she was born about 1750 in Ashe, Hampshire. (Her birth date is as yet unverified; period sources indicate that she was ten years older than her husband George, born in 1760.) Through the Russells, she was a distant relation of the Dukes of Bedford (sixth creation, 1694). She had two siblings, Charles William and Frances; both predeceased her and their parents, which resulted in Mary Russell inheriting her family’s entire estate upon her mother’s death in 1785. Her father’s rectory in Ashe was only a short distance from Steventon, and so she was acquainted with the young Jane Austen. She married George Mitford or Midford on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford. Their only daughter, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. Mary Russell died on January 2, 1830 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. Her obituary in the 1830 New Monthly Magazine gives the "New Year’s day" as the date of her death. --#ajc #lmw
--I am so glad that the [coursing] season approaches--so are they.

God bless you, my dear Mr. HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
--


Ever most sincerely your's
M. R. Mitford.

B. R. Haydon EsqreBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw

22Lisson GroveLisson Grove, Westminster, London, England | Lisson Grove | Westminster | London | England | 51.5247788 -0.16831469999999626 | District in the City of Westminster, London, west of Regent’s Park. Student artists and painters from the Royal Academy lived in this district in the early nineteenth century, including William Blake, Richard Cosway, and Benjamin Robert Haydon. Also the name of a road in the district.--#lmw51.5247788 -0.16831469999999626
Regents ParkRegent’s Park, London, England | Regent’s Park | London | England | 51.5312705 -0.15696939999997994 | Now an upscale neighborhood in north London, Regent’s Park is named for the Royal Park it encompasses. The district was developed after 1811 when the Prince Regent commissioned John Nash to create a plan for the area. The Park was made part of Nash’s larger plans for nearby Regent Street and Carlton House Terrace. The Park’s residential terraces and Inner Circle villas were built during the early nineteenth century, and the Park was opened to the public in 1835. Also the site of the London Zoo (or Regent’s Zoo), created in 1828 for scientific study and opened to the public in 1847.--#ghb #lmw51.5312705 -0.15696939999997994
J. B. MonckJohn Berkeley Monck
Member of Parliament for Reading area 1820-1830, who frequently franked Mary Russell Mitford’s letters. Mitford’s letter to Sir William Elford of 20 March 1820 about the election of Monck describes him in context with a politically active "Patriot" shoemaker, Mr. Warry, who brought him from France. Monck was the author of General Reflections on the System of the Poor Laws (1807), in which he argued for a gradual approach to abolishing the Poor Laws, and for the reform of workhouses. Francis Needham claims that it is he who is referred to in "Violeting", when the narrator thinks she sees "Mr. and Mrs. M. and dear B.". ("Dear B." would be their son, Bligh.) Dr. Webb’s research suggests that "celebrated shoemaker" is Mr. Warry, possibly Joseph Source: Francis Needham, Letter to William Roberts, 26 March 1954. Needham Papers, Reading Central Library.--#lmw #ebb #scw
LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223

How is Mr. KeatsJohn Keats | Born: 1795-10-31 in Moorgate, London. Died: 1821-02-23 in Rome. ? Is he gone to LisbonLisbon, Portugal | Lisbon | Portugal | 38.7222524 -9.139336599999979 | The capital city of Portugal, located on the western Iberian peninsula; one of the oldest cities in the world.--#err #lmw38.7222524 -9.139336599999979 yet? I have not been able to procure hisJohn Keats | Born: 1795-10-31 in Moorgate, London. Died: 1821-02-23 in Rome. PoemsLIEO_Poems
Lamia, Isabella, The Eve of St. Agnes, and Other Poems, published in July 1820, was the last volume of Keats’ poems to appear in print during his lifetime. Keats died from tuberculosis a little over half a year later, in February 1821.--#err
. Perhaps when you come you will have the goodness to bring your copy with you.--Goodbye once more.