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Letter to [B. R. Haydon]Benjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, November 4, 1820.

Edited by Eric Hood.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 1 July 2013. P5. . .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central Library.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 421

Paper. Letter is written on a single octavo sheet folded in half.Letter incomplete. No address leaf, envelope, or postmark.Missing seal.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice,” “sic,” and “reg” to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
20Nov. 4th 1820.Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864My dear Sir

The puppy is arrived & will be taken great care of--What a beauty it is! PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
says he never saw one more promising.--DaphneDaphne
Mitford’s dog, a female greyhound. However, there is also a pug named Daphne in the Our Village sketch Our Godmothers from 3: 1828, 266-287 . That Daphne was a particularly ugly, noisy pug, that barked at every body that came into the house, and bit at most.--#lmw
has not yet been tried--partly because my FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
has been much engaged lately & has had little coursing--but chiefly I really believe because he thinks her delicate & is so afraid of injuring her. She shall be tried soon though--for I will take her coursing myself. In the meantime we walk out together every day, & I tell her your messages, & exhort her to earn her collar. I do think DaphneDaphne
Mitford’s dog, a female greyhound. However, there is also a pug named Daphne in the Our Village sketch Our Godmothers from 3: 1828, 266-287 . That Daphne was a particularly ugly, noisy pug, that barked at every body that came into the house, and bit at most.--#lmw
has sense enough to understand that it is a high honour to belong to Mr. HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
. By the by you have fallen into a very natural mistake for a young sportsman in fancying that "killing page 2
the hare first" is the criterion of excellence in a greyhound. It has very little to do with the matter--When a hare is put up before two dogs the one nearest to her generally turns her towards the other, who comes up & turns her back again--& so they go on if evenly matched for many minutes until at last the hare is exhausted & caught by either as it happens. Now the great proof of superior speed, is, to pass the nearest dog (which in technical terms is called a go bygo-bye) & take two turns together--& this is what I am sure DaphneDaphne
Mitford’s dog, a female greyhound. However, there is also a pug named Daphne in the Our Village sketch Our Godmothers from 3: 1828, 266-287 . That Daphne was a particularly ugly, noisy pug, that barked at every body that came into the house, and bit at most.--#lmw
will do by any greyhound of my acquaintainceacquaintance. I am afraid my explanation is not very clear--It seems to me that nobody could understand it that did not know the whole mystery beforehand--but if you wish to get a thorough insight into coursing look at the rules drawn up by the Duke of NorfolkThomas Howard, fourth duke of Norfolk | Born: 1538-03-10 in Kenninghall Palace, Norfolk, England. Died: 1572-06-02 in Tower Hill, London.
The Fourth Duke of Norfolk, convicted of treason and executed for the charge of involvement in the Ridolfi plot against Queen Elizabeth I, to place Mary, Queen of Scots, on the English throne and to restore Catholicism in England. The Duke also wrote the first complete set of English coursing rules.--#esh
in Queen ElizabethElizabeth Tudor, Queen Elizabeth I, Queen of England, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, etc. | Born: 1533-09-07 in Palace of Placentia, Greenwich, England. Died: 1603-03-24 in Richmond Palace, Surrey, England.
The last of the Tudor monarchs, and defender of father’s instition of a Protestant Church of England, Elizabeth I was Queen of England, France, and Ireland from 1588 until her death in 1603. --#ebb
's day which you will find in Daniell's Rural SportsRural Sports. William Barker Daniel.
Printed in numerous editions between 1801-1817.--#esh
. They are the authority to all Coursers to this hour.

page 3

And your picture is really going to EdinburghEdinburgh, Lothian, Scotland | Edinburgh | Lothian | Scotland | 55.953252 -3.188266999999996 | The capital and second-largest city in Scotland, located on the Firth of Forth. Site of the University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh Castle, and Holyrood Palace.--#lmw55.953252 -3.188266999999996! What an answer to Blackwood's MagazineBlackwood’s Magazine. 1817-04-1980.
Founded as a Tory magazine in opposition to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review.--#ebb
![1] MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
refers to Haydon's painting, "Christ's Entry Into Jerusalem"Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem. Benjamin Robert Haydon.
One of Haydon’s three enormous paintings of biblical scenes, together with The Judgment of Solomon and The Resurrection of Lazarus. The ODNB notes the dimensions of Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem as "12 ft 6 in. × 15 ft 1 in., with a frame weighing 600 lb." Exhibited at Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London. Wiliam Wordsworth’s head appears in the picture. Now housed in the Athenaeum of Ohio Art Collection of Mount St. Mary’s Seminary. [Source: ODNB]--#ebb
which he exhibited in EdinburghEdinburgh, Lothian, Scotland | Edinburgh | Lothian | Scotland | 55.953252 -3.188266999999996 | The capital and second-largest city in Scotland, located on the Firth of Forth. Site of the University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh Castle, and Holyrood Palace.--#lmw55.953252 -3.188266999999996 in December 1820. See Haydon's letter to George BeaumontGeorge Howland Beaumont, Sir, Seventh Baronet, member of Parliament for Bere Alston | Born: 1753-11-06 in Great Dunmow, Essex, England. Died: 1827-02-07 in Coleorton, Leicestershire, England.
Art collector, patron of the arts, and amateur painter; he donated the first collection to form the National Gallery in London. Exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1794 and 1825. Friend and patron to Wordsworth, Haydon, and Thomas Hearne. --#ebb #lmw
of 26 December 1820 in Benjamin Robert Haydon: Correspondence and Table-Talk1 of 2350Benjamin Robert Haydon: Correspondence and Table-Talk. Benjamin Robert Haydon, Frederick Wordsworth Haydon. Chatto and Windus, Piccadilly. 1876. The mention of Blackwood'sBlackwood’s Magazine. 1817-04-1980.
Founded as a Tory magazine in opposition to the Whiggish Edinburgh Review.--#ebb
likely recalls the August 1818 issue in which HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
was attacked by the anonymous "Z." who had been lambasting the Hunt and Keats circle as the "Cockney School."
The August 1818 article had described HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
as "that clever, but most affected artist, who as little resembles RaphaelRaphael Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino | Born: 1483. Died: 1520-04-06.
Italian Renaissance artist and architect.--#ebb
in genius as he does in person, not-withstanding the foppery of having his hair curled over his shoulders in the old Italian fashion."—#ebb
Will the Scotchthe people of Scotland | Scotch | Scots | Scotchmen have taste enough to find out its exquisite beauty? I hope they will--for I have a sneaking kindness for the Countrymen of HumeDavid Hume, or: David Hume | Born: 1711-05-07 in Edinburgh Midlothian Scotland . Died: 1776-08-25 in Edinburgh Midlothian Scotland .
The most influential philosopher of the Scottish Enlightenment, Hume championed skepticism in various contexts. He also wrote a celebrated History of England (1754-61), which covered English history from the Roman Invasion through the reign of James II . --#rnes
& SmollettTobias George Smollett | Born: 1721-03-19 in Dalquhurn, Scotland. Died: 1771-09-17 in Antignano, near Livorno, Italy.
Novelist and poet, as well as editor, translator, critic, and medical practitioner. Smollett’s best-known novels were written between 1748 and 1753: The Adventures of Roderick Random (1748), The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle (1751), and The Adventures of Ferdinand Count Fathom (1753), and his four-volume Complete History of England was published in 1754, revised in 1758 . Together with Thomas Francklin, Smollett helped edit the 35-volume English translation of The Works of Voltaire, from 1761-1765 . He travelled extensively in France and Italy in his last years. (Source ODNB).--#ebb #esh
& BurnsRobert Burns | Born: 1759-01-25 in Alloway, Ayrshire, Scotland. Died: 1796-07-21 in Dumfries, Scotland.
Scottish poet, author of Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect (1786). Rented and farmed the 170-acre Ellisand Farm, where he built a house and collected and rewrote local songs and ballads from his neighbors. Burns’s poems and songs were mostly published in posthumous collections between 1799 and 1808 . --#ebb #esh
& ScottWalter Scott | Born: 1771-08-15 in Edinburgh, Scotland. Died: 1832-09-21 in Abbotsford, Scotland.
Scottish antiquarian, poet, and novelist. Also worked as clerk of the Court of Session in Edinburgh. He assembled a collection of Scottish ballads, many of which had never before been printed, in Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, first published in 1802, but continually expanded in revised editions through 1812 . Author of the long romance poems, The Lay of the Last Minstrel (1805), Marmion (1808), and The Lady of the Lake (1810). From 1814-1831, Scott published 23 novels, and over the course of his literary career, he wrote review articles for the Edinburgh Review, The Quarterly Review, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, and the Foreign Quarterly Review.--#ebb #esh
& WilkieWilliam Wilkie | Born: 1721-10-05 in Echlin, Scotland. Died: 1772-10-10 in St. Andrews, Scotland.
Scottish poet and minister of Ratho, most known for his epic in nine books, The Epigoniad (1757), written in the style made popular by Alexander Pope. Locally dubbed the "potatoe minister" for his continuing to work the Fisher’s Tryste farm, whose unexpired lease he inherited from his deceased father. [See ODNB and Electric Scotland.]--#esh #ebb
--in spite of their sins--& in spite of our being Borderers on the English side. My FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
had an Aunt[2] This aunt of George MitfordGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
's has not yet been identified.—#ebb
who bred him up & with whom I liked to spend a good deal of my time whose national prejudice against her Scottish neighbors realised all that has been told of the old border hatreds. She could not bear a Scotchmanthe people of Scotland | Scotch | Scots | Scotchmen in her sight--nor one who had a drop of Scotch blood in his veins. Oh how she would have gloried in such a Champion as you! Miss JamesElizabeth Mary James | Born: . Died: .
Close friend and correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. She was born about 1775 in Bath, Somerset, the eldest daughter of Thomas Webb and Susanna Haycock. Her father died in 1818 and her mother in 1835. After her parents’ deaths, she lived with her two younger sisters, Emily and Susan, in Green Park Buildings, Bath, Walcot, Somerset; High Street, Mortlake, Surrey; and 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey. According to Coles, referring to Mitford’s diary, letters were also addressed to her at Bellevue, Lower Road, Richmond (Coles 26). She died on November 25, 1861, at 3 Pembroke Villas, Richmond, Surrey and was buried at St. Mary Magdalene, Richmond, Surrey. In the 1841 census, under "profession, trade, employment, or independent means" she lists "Ind." for "independent means;" in the 1851 census, she lists "landholder;" in the 1861 census, she lists "railway shareholder."--#lmw
is just such another--albeit [unused] to the hating mood--she quite detests them. I had a letter from her the other day, & she expressed very strongly her regret at missing you--I can well believe that poor RichmondRichmond, London, England | Richmond upon Thames | Richmond | London | England | 51.46131099999999 -0.3037420000000566 | Richmond upon Thames, now a borough of London, formerly part of Surrey. The Hoflands lived there and Thomas Hofland painted views of the area.--#lmw51.46131099999999 -0.3037420000000566 looked like a faded beauty. There is nopage 4
place that requires so much fine weather, bright sunshine, blue sky, & white robed ladies, as RichmondRichmond, London, England | Richmond upon Thames | Richmond | London | England | 51.46131099999999 -0.3037420000000566 | Richmond upon Thames, now a borough of London, formerly part of Surrey. The Hoflands lived there and Thomas Hofland painted views of the area.--#lmw51.46131099999999 -0.3037420000000566. For RichmondRichmond, London, England | Richmond upon Thames | Richmond | London | England | 51.46131099999999 -0.3037420000000566 | Richmond upon Thames, now a borough of London, formerly part of Surrey. The Hoflands lived there and Thomas Hofland painted views of the area.--#lmw51.46131099999999 -0.3037420000000566, charming place as it is, with its rosy gardens & its brimmming river is not that fresh homely delightful thing the Country. It is rather a holiday spot for ladies & gentleman where they lead a happy out-of-door life like the gay folks in WatteauJean-Antoine Watteau | Born: 1684-10-10. Died: 1721-07-18.
French painter known for his bucolic landscapes and country scenes in the Late-Baroque, or Roccoco, style.--#esh
's pictures & have nothing to do with the work a day world. But I should have thought the view from the hill would have been improved by the rich tints of Autumn which would break the uniformity of those heavy masses of foliage--since to confess the truth I have often been tempted to agree with the American criticism & to think the view wanted "clearing." Nevertheless it is a charming place--full of quiet elegance--&  [3] begin cancelling in red pencil—#esh of Miss James--its greatest attraction in my eyes.[4] end strikethrough cancelling in red pencil—#esh I am hoping & expecting to see her here--She threatens not to come--but she cannot have the heart to disappointpage 1
me.

Ever yours, MRMMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb

.[5] The last word of the letter, together with the closer and signature are written across the top of the letter's first page.—#ebb