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Letter to T. N. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
1822 August 13

Edited by Lisa M. Wilson.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 24 May 2014. P5. . .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the The John Rylands University Library.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: The John Rylands University Library. Shelf mark: JRL English MS 665 no. 13 Coles no. 40

One quarto sheet of paper folded in half to form two octavo pages, and then folded into four panels to expose the address.Address leaf bearing the following postmarks: 1) black elliptical Receiving House stamp
[Gap: 1 chars, reason: illegible.]
Unpaid
Berners StBerners Street, London, England | London | England | 51.5170055 -0.1365471000000298 | In London, location of nearest postal receiving office to Barbara Hofland’s address on Newman Street, two blocks away.--#lmw51.5170055 -0.1365471000000298
. 2) Sepia indented single rim oval stamp reading
7 o'Clock[1] According to Coles, the stamp reads "2 o'Clock."—#err

14 AU

1822
A large 2 denoting the fee for a single-sheet letter has been written in black ink by the postal service across the address leaf.The upper right corner of page three is torn. Red wax seal.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

  • Someone cataloging the letters, apparently other than Mitford, numbered each on page 1. This letter numbered 13.
Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864August 13thMy dear Sir

This morning brought me your very kind letter--I cannot express to you how much I am gratified & touched by your kindness & confidence--Oh may you be as happy as I wish you! And you will be so--There are some characters that make their own destiny, & your's is one of them--& who can doubt the merits of the woman of your choice! It will be amongst my first & highest pleasures to be made known to her. In the mean timemeantime your secret shall be quite safe--you delight me by your promise to let us know the day--Oh we shall all drink bumpers to that toast--Out of your own families none can think of it with deeper interest. What must we be made of if we did not!--The same post that brought me your delightful letter, brought another that will give you pleasure too--a page 2
letter from Mr. KembleCharles Kemble that which I transcribe verbatim. My dear MadamMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
--I have with encreasedincreased pleasure reperused the Tragedy of FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. & am happy to inform you that with your consent we shall produce it as early as possible in the next season, which commences on the first of October. There will be a few slight alterations necessary to be made in it previously & the sooner the better. If you are coming to LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 & would honour me with a call, a few minutes conversation would suffice to make all the requisite arrangements with regard to its production I am -- &c &c--Is not this delightful. You did not expect it--did you?--Nor I I am sure--Nobody did but my dear FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
--& you should have seen his Joy & his triumph! I believe it was necessary to have been as much cast down as I have been to have tasted such exquisite pleasure. God grant I may deserve it! I am so thrilling with joy & thankfulness that I can hardly write--but I could not let one day elapse without making the kind & unwearied partner of my fears & disappointments a part-page 3
ner in my hopes though perhaps you [Gap: 1 word, reason: torn.][will] not receive my letter yet awhile.--[Gap: 2 word, reason: torn.][I am] so very slow I think in case the [Gap: 6 chars, reason: torn.][alter]ations should be troublesome that I had better see Mr. KembleCharles Kemble as soon as I can & as PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
cannot stir  before till after Saturday, I think to drive up to TownLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 on Sunday or Monday(18th or 19th) to take his directions.--You will be better engaged--but PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
will call at the TempleTemple, London, England | Temple | London | England | 51.5123032 -0.1110459000000219 | District in central London, traditional location for barristers’ chambers and other offices for legal practice, with its four Inns of Court. The Inner Temple, one of the four Inns of Court, was responsible for training and licensing barristers. Talfourd had chambers in this neighborhood, although not in the Inner Temple, and Mitford addressed letters to him there.--#ebb #err51.5123032 -0.1110459000000219 just for five minutes to get your advice. I suppose Mr. MacreadyWilliam Macready
English actor (1793-1873) Born London, died Cheltenham. Appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane. Appeared in Sheridan Knowles’s William Tell (1825) and Bulwer-Lytton’s Money (1840) --#lmw
would not object to play the DogeDoge Foscari
character in Mitford’s play Foscari See also historical counterpart: Doge Foscari.--#ebb
, if Mr. KembleCharles Kemble should wish it--though of course I should not take the liberty to answer for it--Would it be right to leave the choice of performers & all affairs of that nature to the ManagerCharles Kemble? I suppose so. I hope you will be in TownLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 for I am--we are--so totally ignorant of theatrical business that to see you only for two minutes would be an inexpressible comfort. Besides I am superstitious & don't think things would prosper without you.--I shall be at Mrs. HoflandBarbara Wreaks Hofland | Born: 1770 in Yorkshire. Died: 1844-11-04 in Richmond-on-Thames.
Novelist and writer of children’s books popular in England and America, Barbara Hofland was a native of Sheffield, Yorkshire, where she published poems from July 1794 in the local newspaper, The Sheffield Iris. Her first marriage to Thomas Bradshawe Hoole left her widowed and in poverty, raising a son, Frederic, on her own, and she supported herself by publishing poems and children’s books, and by running a girl’s school in Harrogate. second marriage was to the artist Thomas Christopher Hofland. (Source: ODNB)--#ebb
's 23. Newman Street.Newman Street, London, England | London | England | 51.5174283 -0.135544100000061 | Newman Street in London. Barbara Hofland’s address in the 1820s was 23 Newman Street. It is located between Oxford Street and Mortimer Street, east of Bedford Square in North London.--#lmw51.5174283 -0.135544100000061--Once again my best & kindest friend page 4
accept our truest & heartiest thanks--If FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. succeeds it will be entirely through you--In all but the mere language it is more your play than mine.--God bless you & prosper you & make you as happy as I wish you--& as I am at this moment--


Ever your's M R Mitford.Mary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She died on 10 January 1855 at Swallowfield, Berkshire and she is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb


--Pray don't give yourself the trouble of walking to Newman StreetNewman Street, London, England | London | England | 51.5174283 -0.135544100000061 | Newman Street in London. Barbara Hofland’s address in the 1820s was 23 Newman Street. It is located between Oxford Street and Mortimer Street, east of Bedford Square in North London.--#lmw51.5174283 -0.135544100000061 at such a moment. My fatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
will call on you--Once again God bless you

Dr. MitfordGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
returned to Pump Co[Gap: 3 chars, reason: torn.][urt]Pump Court, Temple, London, England | Temple | London | England | 51.5129777 -0.11061770000003435 | Thomas Noon Talfourd’s address in London, in the Temple district; Mitford addressed letters to him at 1 Pump Court. Pump Court is west off Middle Temple Lane, north of the Inner Temple.--#ebb #err #lmw51.5129777 -0.11061770000003435 on ThursdayMorngMorning ea[Gap: 3 chars, reason: torn.][rly]

In one of the Nos.numbers of the MuseumThe Museum; or Record of Literature, Fine Arts, Antiquities, the Drama, &c.. 1822-04-27.
a weekly periodical edited by Peter Bayley and printed by John Valpy.--#lmw
you will find a certain unworthy sonnetOn Reading a Ballad of Wordsworth , Museum. Mary Russell Mitford. 1822-08-31. [2] ColesWilliam Allan Coles
Wrote his PhD Dissertation to the Dept. of English at Harvard University of August 1956 as an edition of the correspondence of Mary Russell Mitford and Thomas Noon Talfourd, representing parts of the collections at the John Rylands Library and the Harvard and Yale special collections. Coles taught at the University of Virginiauntil 1958, when he moved to the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He corresponded extensively with Francis Needhamin the 1950s, during the course of which they exchanged research on contextual information, and shared transcriptions of Mitford’s letters. Some of Coles’s letters are preserved among Needham’s papers, held at the Reading Central Library .--#scw #ebb
suggests that this is "'On Reading a Ballad of WordsworthWilliam Wordsworth | Born: 1770-04-07 in Cockermouth, England. Died: 1850-04-23 in Cumberland, England. On Reading a Ballad of Wordsworth , Museum. Mary Russell Mitford. 1822-08-31. ,' which appeared in the MuseumThe Museum; or Record of Literature, Fine Arts, Antiquities, the Drama, &c.. 1822-04-27.
a weekly periodical edited by Peter Bayley and printed by John Valpy.--#lmw
, I (August 31, 1822), 301
." (Coles #40, p. 201, note 6).—#lmw
.--How scandalously ill Mr. CampbellThomas Campbell | Born: 1777-07-27 in Glasgow, Scotland. Died: 1844-06-15 in Boulogne-sur-Mer, France.
Scottish poet and editor: author of The Pleasures of Hope (1799) and Gertrude of Wyoming (1799). Editor of the New Monthly Magazine from 1821 to 1830, in which capacity he knew Thomas Noon Talfourd as a contributor. See Cyrus Redding’s Literary Reminiscences and Memoirs of Thomas Campbell . Possibly the Mr. Campbell that Mitford mentions in her letter to Talfourd of 13 August 1822 . --#ebb
[3] —#ebb has behaved to you!--Oh he is the least of the little!

To T. N. TalfourdThomas Noon Talfourd | Born: 1795-05-26 in Reading, Berkshire, England. Died: 1854-03-13 in Stafford, Staffordshire, England.
Close friend, literary mentor, and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Thomas Noon Talfourd was born on May 26, 1795 at Reading, Berkshire and baptised on July 12, 1795 at the Broad Street Chapel in Reading, the eldest child of Rev. Edward Talfourd and Anne Isabella Noon. His father was a brewer and later established a lunatic asylum for female patients at Normand House, Fulham, which he ran until his death, and the supervision of which was later conducted by his wife and his daughter Anne. Thomas Noon Talfourd married Rachel Rutt on August 31, 1822 at St. John, Hackney, Middlesex. Rachel was the daughter of radical politician and writer John Towill Rutt. Thomas and Rachel had five children: Francis, Mary, Katharine, Thomas Noon [II], and William Wordsworth. In 1832, the family lived at 26 Henrietta Street, St Andrew, Holborn and St George the Martyr, Bloomsbury, England. In 1837, they lived at 56 Russell Square, St. George, Bloomsbury. Talfourd’s chambers were at 2 Elm Court, Temple, London. Talfourd was educated at the newly-established Mill Hill school, a dissenting academy in Reading, from 1808 to 1810. He attended Dr. Richard Valpy’s Reading School from 1810 to 1812. He completed a legal apprenticeship with Joseph Christy, special pleader, in 1817, and was called to the bar in London in 1821. He ultimately earned a D.C.L. (Doctor of Civil Laws) from Oxford on June 20, 1844. While establishing his practice as a barrister and special pleader, he worked as legal correspondent for The Times, reporting on the Oxford Circuit, and also continued his literary interests. After 1833, he was appointed Serjeant at Law, as well as a King’s and Queen’s Counsel. He was elected and served as Member of Parliament for Reading from 1835 to 1841 and from 1847 to 1849 ; he served with Charles Fyshe Palmer, Charles Russell, and Francis Piggott. Highlights of his political and legal career included introducing the first copyright bill into Parliament in 1837 (for which action Charles Dickens dedicated Pickwick Papers to him) and defending Edward Moxon’s publication of Percy Shelley’s Queen Mab in 1841 . He was appointed Queen’s Serjeant in 1846 and Judge of Common Pleas in 1849 , at which post he served until his death in 1854. He was knighted in 1850 . Talfourd’s literary works include his plays Ion (1835), The Athenian Captive (1837) and Glencoe, or the Fate of the MacDonalds(1839). --#lmw #cmm
Esqre.
No. 1. Pump CourtPump Court, Temple, London, England | Temple | London | England | 51.5129777 -0.11061770000003435 | Thomas Noon Talfourd’s address in London, in the Temple district; Mitford addressed letters to him at 1 Pump Court. Pump Court is west off Middle Temple Lane, north of the Inner Temple.--#ebb #err #lmw51.5129777 -0.11061770000003435
TempleTemple, London, England | Temple | London | England | 51.5123032 -0.1110459000000219 | District in central London, traditional location for barristers’ chambers and other offices for legal practice, with its four Inns of Court. The Inner Temple, one of the four Inns of Court, was responsible for training and licensing barristers. Talfourd had chambers in this neighborhood, although not in the Inner Temple, and Mitford addressed letters to him there.--#ebb #err51.5123032 -0.1110459000000219