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Letter to Mary Elizabeth WebbMary Elizabeth Webb | Born: 1796-04-15 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: .
Close friend and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Mary Webb was born about 1796, the daughter of James Webb, Esq., and Jane Elizabeth Ogbourn. Baptized on April 15, 1796 in Wokingham, Berkshire. Sister of Elizabeth (called Eliza) and Jane Eleanor Webb and niece of the elder Mary Webb, "Aunt Mary". In Needham’s papers, he notes from the Berkshire Directorythat she lived on Broad street, presumably in Wokingham, Berkshire. She was the wife of Thomas Hawkins, Esq., as she is referred to thus in probate papers of 1858 regarding the wills of her sister Eliza Webb Walter and her husband Henry Walter. Date of death unknown. More research needed.--#scw #lmw
, February 11, 1820

Edited by Samantha Webb.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: February 8, 2017. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--#ghb
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Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: No shelfmark identified

[One] page of paper, four page surfaces photographed. Page has been folded in half width-wise and in thirds length-wise. Sheet stained on right edge of page four. No seal is present.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded.
11 Feb. 1820 written in square brackets Bertram HouseBertram House, Berkshire, England | Grazeley | Berkshire | England | | Mansion built by George Mitford for his family residence, begun in April 1802 and completed in June 1804, after tearing down the previous house on the property, Grazeley Court Farm, a farmhouse about three miles outside of Reading, in the hamlet of Grazeley. George Mitford named his new house after a knight from the reign of William the Conqueror, Sir Robert de Bertram, who had married Sibella Mitford, daughter of Sir John de Mitford (source: Vera Watson). This estate signified George Mitford’s status as a land-owning country gentleman. Prior to this time, the Mitford family lived in Alresford and then in Reading. The family removed from Bertram House in April 1820, after financial reverses forced the family to sell the property.--#ebb #lmw Friday. My dearMaryMary Elizabeth Webb | Born: 1796-04-15 in Wokingham, Berkshire, England. Died: .
Close friend and frequent correspondent of Mary Russell Mitford. Mary Webb was born about 1796, the daughter of James Webb, Esq., and Jane Elizabeth Ogbourn. Baptized on April 15, 1796 in Wokingham, Berkshire. Sister of Elizabeth (called Eliza) and Jane Eleanor Webb and niece of the elder Mary Webb, "Aunt Mary". In Needham’s papers, he notes from the Berkshire Directorythat she lived on Broad street, presumably in Wokingham, Berkshire. She was the wife of Thomas Hawkins, Esq., as she is referred to thus in probate papers of 1858 regarding the wills of her sister Eliza Webb Walter and her husband Henry Walter. Date of death unknown. More research needed.--#scw #lmw

Will Mr. James Wheeler think me the greatest encroacher on his kindness that ever lived, if I venture to ask him to extend the gratifiation he has afforded me by the perusal of Mr. Lawrence's book to one much more worthy of it—to Mr. SherwoodThomas Sherwood
Practiced medicine in Reading. He was a friend of John Berkeley Monck, and likely others in the Reading political scene. Sources: Needham Papers, Reading Central Library ; History of Parliament Online. ReadingBorough http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading. --#scw
?—I met him yesterday at Mrs. Jolliffe's & in course of talk Mr. Lawrence came on the carpet—I found Mr. SherwoodThomas Sherwood
Practiced medicine in Reading. He was a friend of John Berkeley Monck, and likely others in the Reading political scene. Sources: Needham Papers, Reading Central Library ; History of Parliament Online. ReadingBorough http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading. --#scw
a great admirer of his [del: .] very indignant at his ill usage page 2
& above all ^Is very desirous to read this uncomeatable book that I even ventured to say I thought I could procure him that pleasure. Will you tell this to Mr. James Wheeler & if he is so very very good as to gratify Mr. S.Thomas Sherwood
Practiced medicine in Reading. He was a friend of John Berkeley Monck, and likely others in the Reading political scene. Sources: Needham Papers, Reading Central Library ; History of Parliament Online. ReadingBorough http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading. --#scw
's desire tell him that it will be best I think to send it directed to Mr. Sherwood EsqreThomas Sherwood
Practiced medicine in Reading. He was a friend of John Berkeley Monck, and likely others in the Reading political scene. Sources: Needham Papers, Reading Central Library ; History of Parliament Online. ReadingBorough http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading. --#scw
Church Lane, ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753—I would not give him this additional trouble but as I don't know when I should myself be able to fetch it from WokinghamWokingham, Berkshire, England | Wokingham | Berkshire | England | 51.410457 -0.8338610000000699 | A market town in south east England in Berkshire, near Reading. The Mitfords sometimes travelled to Wokingham on their way to London, or to visit the home of their friends, the Webbs.--#lmw #err51.410457 -0.8338610000000699, I think it the best way of avoiding a certain round-about & a possible [risk]. Mr. SherwoodThomas Sherwood
Practiced medicine in Reading. He was a friend of John Berkeley Monck, and likely others in the Reading political scene. Sources: Needham Papers, Reading Central Library ; History of Parliament Online. ReadingBorough http://www.historyofparliamentonline.org/volume/1820-1832/constituencies/reading. --#scw
promises page 3
& above all to be very expeditious & careful, & [grateful] all his life—so do I.

PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
Father of Mary Rusell Mitford, George Mitford was the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. The family name is sometimes recorded as Midford. Immediate family called him by nicknames including Drum, Tod, and Dodo. He was a member of a minor branch of the Mitfords of Mitford Castle in Northumberland. Although later sources would suggest that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree and he did not generally refer to himself as Dr. Mitford, preferring to style himself Esq.. In 1784, he is listed in a Hampshire directory as surgeon (medicine) of Alresford. His father and grandfather worked as apothecary-surgeons and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. He assisted Mitford's literary career by representing her interests in London and elsewhere with theater owners and publishers. He was active in Whig politics and later served as a local magistrate. He coursed greyhounds with his friend James Webb. --#lmw
got home quite late the other night—or rather the other morning—sad man to keep you all up so! I dare say it was his fault—(I brought him in excellent time from Mrs. Jolliffe's)—he was quite full of a new lover which you or Miss ElizaElizabeth Eliza Webb | Born: 1797-03-03 in . Died: .
Elizabeth Webb, called Eliza, was a neighbor and friend of Mary Russell Mitford. Eliza Webb was born about 1797, the youngest daughter of James Webb, Esq., and Jane Elizabeth Ogbourn. She was baptized privately on March 3, 1797, and publicly on June 8, 1797 in Wokingham, Berkshire. She is the sister of Mary Elizabeth and Jane Eleanor Webb. In 1837 she married Henry Walters, Esq., in Wokingham, Berkshire. In Needham’s papers, he notes from the Berkshire Directorythat she lived on Broad street, presumably in Wokingham. Her date of death is unknown. She died after 1822, at which date she is mentioned in papers relating to her father’s will and estate. Source: See Needham’s letter to Roberts on November 27, 1953 . More research needed.--#scw #lmw
(he has ^not quite settled which) has gotten—he says he won't give his consent—& boasts that Miss WheelerKate Wheeler, or: Miss Wheeler
Friend of Miss James. Mitford refers to her as providing home remedies and advice. See 29 January 1821 letter to Mary Webb. More research needed.--#lmw
was of his opinion—for my part I scarcely know the gentleman—so I say nothing.—Mrs. DickinsonCatherine Dickinson Allingham | Born: 1787 in Middlesex, England. Died: 1861-09-02 in St. Marylebone, Middlesex, England.
Catherine Allingham was the daughter of Thomas Allingham. She married Charles Dickinson on August 2, 1807 at St. Giles, South Mimms, Middlesex. They lived in Swallowfield, Berkshire, where their daughter Frances was born, and where they were visited by the Mitford family. According to Mitford, Catherine Dickinson was fond of match-making among her friends and acquaintances. (See Mitford's February 8th, 1821 letter to Elford . Her husband Charles died in 1827, when her daughter was seven. Source: L'Estrange). --#ajc #lmw
is not in bed yet—very tiresome—MollyMolly_pet - f
MRM's dog, whom she describes in a letter of 1820-11-27 as a "pretty little Spaniel with long curling hair--so white & delicate & ladylike".--#ebb
's in page 4
the same way—very tiresome too!—PapaGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
Father of Mary Rusell Mitford, George Mitford was the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. The family name is sometimes recorded as Midford. Immediate family called him by nicknames including Drum, Tod, and Dodo. He was a member of a minor branch of the Mitfords of Mitford Castle in Northumberland. Although later sources would suggest that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree and he did not generally refer to himself as Dr. Mitford, preferring to style himself Esq.. In 1784, he is listed in a Hampshire directory as surgeon (medicine) of Alresford. His father and grandfather worked as apothecary-surgeons and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. He assisted Mitford's literary career by representing her interests in London and elsewhere with theater owners and publishers. He was active in Whig politics and later served as a local magistrate. He coursed greyhounds with his friend James Webb. --#lmw
& Captain [Tappen/Taffer] were out for 6 hours today on Mortimer CommonMortimer Common, Berkshire, England | Mortimer Common | Berkshire | England | 51.3770005 -1.0629936999999927 | Village east of Swallowfield in Berkshire.--#lmw51.3770005 -1.0629936999999927 & never saw hare or rabbit! Think of that!—There is no place like the dear Heath after all.

We had a very agreeable day yesterday—Harry Marsh Mrs. Jolliffe & I made such a noise that you might have heard us at WokinghamWokingham, Berkshire, England | Wokingham | Berkshire | England | 51.410457 -0.8338610000000699 | A market town in south east England in Berkshire, near Reading. The Mitfords sometimes travelled to Wokingham on their way to London, or to visit the home of their friends, the Webbs.--#lmw #err51.410457 -0.8338610000000699 if you had [del: .] been listening—Good bye my own dear love—say every thing affectionate to all your house & to dear Miss WheelerKate Wheeler, or: Miss Wheeler
Friend of Miss James. Mitford refers to her as providing home remedies and advice. See 29 January 1821 letter to Mary Webb. More research needed.--#lmw

—>Ever your's
M. R. MitfordMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
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Write soon[1] a vertical strike mark follows the word soon—#avg