Maintained by: Elisa E. Beshero-Bondar (ebb8 at pitt.edu) Creative Commons LicenseLast modified: 2019-11-21T06:18:10.039Z

Our default is the Diplomatic view.
Click to toggle the Normalized view
(shows conventional spellings;
hides pagebreaks, insertion marks, and deletions):

Letter to Benjamin Robert HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, August 13, 1820

Edited by Anne Longmuir .

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: July 12, 2018. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: 13Aug1820BRHaydon1.JPG, 13Aug1820BRHaydon2.JPG, 13Aug1820BRHaydon3.JPG, 13Aug1820BRHaydon4.JPG, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 410

One sheet of paper, two surfaces photographed, folded in half once perpendicularly. Letter appears to be an opening fragment with no closer or address leaf. No address leaf, no postmarks. No seal.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded. Began transcription. Set up file and filled out header for Anne to begin transcription.
page 1
To B.R. Haydon E.
Fragment
13 Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 August 13th 1820.. My dear SirBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He committed suicide in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw

My FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: 1760-11-15 in Hexham, Northumberland, England. Died: 1842-12-11 in Three Mile Cross, Shinfield, Berkshire, England.
George Mitford was born on November 15, 1760 in Hexham, Northumberland, the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. He was related to the Mitfords of Mitford Castle, Northumberland. In 1784, he was living in Alresford and is listed in a Hampshire directory as "surgeon (medicine)." Although later sources would claim that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree; his father and grandfather worked as surgeon-apothecaries and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. George Mitford died on December 11, 1842 at Three Mile Cross in the parish of Shinfield, Berkshire. --#lmw
would have answered your very kind letter immediately had he not been expecting from day to day to go to town where he intended to have the pleasure of seeing you. He is still thinking of going tomorrow or Tuesday - but I cannot bear this appearance of neglect & shall write as a venture to be franked off from ReadingReading, Berkshire, England | Reading | Berkshire | England | 51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 | County town in Berkshire, in the Thames valley at the confluence of the Thames and the River Kennet. The town developed as a river port and in Mitford’s time served as a staging point on the Bath Road and was developing into a center of manufacturing. Mitford lived here with her parents from 1791 to 1795, on Coley Avenue in the parish of St. Mary’s and attended the Abbey School. The family returned to Reading from 1797 to about 1804, after which they relocated to Bertram House. They frequently visited Reading thereafter from their homes at nearby Bertram House, Three Mile Cross and Swallowfield. Mitford later used scenes from Reading as the basis for Belford Regis; or Sketches of a Country Town.--#lmw51.4542645 -0.9781302999999753 or taken to LondonLondon, England | London | England | 51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 | Capital city of England and the United Kingdom; one the oldest cities in Western Europe. Major seaport and global trading center at the mouth of the Thames. From 1831 to 1925, the largest city in the world.--#lmw51.5073509 -0.12775829999998223 by my father as may happen. — We shall be infinitely obliged to you for one puppy (only one) which shall be a joint property between Papa & me — Will you name it? I should like it to have a name of your choosing beginning with an M remember — such old coursers as we must not depart from the rule. — Mr. Webb will be enchanted with his brace — he had been unfortunate this year & never had so few puppies in his life — I should page 2
be enchanted too with your kind liberality to our friend if I were not afraid that by sending so many into this quarter you had deprived yourself of the opportunity of obliging other people I only say, what I so often think that you are a thousand times too good. — The puppies may be sent whenever you like — only write a line to give notice. — I have not seen Mr. Webb since we heard from you, but have no more doubt of his hospitality to your greyhounds than I should have of his hospitality to myself — at all events if not there they could be here — but they would be better there amongst green fields & with so many other dogs than here shut up in a close stable or lying along the side of the road. Send them certainly. The coursing season will begin in about six weeks — perhaps later — it will depend on the weather — The ground is now as hard as a rock & will require a fortnight’s soaking to make it fit for the dog’s feet. We all look forward page 3
to this coursing season, my dear Sir, with very unusual pleasure I assure you.

Before I received your touching letter I had seen your noble & manly appeal in the London MagazineThe London Magazine. 1820-1829.
An 18th-century periodical of this title (The London Magazine, or Gentleman’s Monthly Intelligencer) ran from 1732 to 1785 . In 1820, John Scott launched a new series of The London Magazine emulating the style of Blackwood’s Magazine, though the two magazines soon came into heated contention. This series ran until 1829, and this is the series to which Mitford and her correspondents frequently refer in their letters. Scott’s editorship lasted until his death by duel on 27 February 1821 resulting form bitter personal conflict with the editors of Blackwood’s Magazine connected with their insulting characterization of a London Cockney School. After Scott’s death, William Hazlitt took up editing the magazine with the April 1821 issue.--#ebb #lmw
[2] Reference to Haydon's recent article On the Relative Encouragement of Sculpture and of Painting in England in London Magazine August 1820, vol. 2, no. 8. pp. 207-9 . In the article, Haydon makes the case for the public purchase of Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem—#aol & wondered how any one with a guinea in his purse & a heart of flesh in his bosom could resist such a statement.—I am not however so much surprised at the failure of the subscription. Vanity I am afraid is the soul of English patronage — & that inimitable pictureChrstEJrslm_Haydon - painting - oil
One of Haydon’s three enormous paintings of biblical scenes, together with The Judgment of Solomon and The Resurrection of Lazarus. The ODNB notes the dimensions of Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem as "12 ft 6 in. × 15 ft 1 in., with a frame weighing 600 lb." Exhibited at Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London. Wiliam Wordsworth’s head appears in the picture. Now housed in the Athenaeum of Ohio Art Collection of Mount St. Mary’s Seminary. [Source: ODNB]--#ebb
has perhaps a better chance of being purchased for the éclat of the thing than of being bestowed upon a church in the unostentatious manner you proposed — It will certainly be bought I am quite sure of that — probably by some parvenu who will like it the better for costing a large sum. I cannot think why the KingGeorge Augustus Frederick , King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Prince Regent, or: Prince Regent | Born: 1762-08-12 in St James’s Palace, London, England. Died: 1830-06-26 in Windsor Castle, London, England.
The Regency period was named for George when he ruled in his father’s stead from 1811 to 1820. --#ebb
does not purchase that & popularity at a stroke He could do nothing half so wise — Have the Mulgraves no personal interest with him? Has the subject been hinted to him? Forgive me if these questions seem impertinent page 4
they proceed from an interest too strong to be repressed. — It is indeed a comfort my dear Sir that that divine Image should so strong a possession of your soul — Nothing but that could have sustained you through such a suspense & agitation as you have suffered — Do you intend the face in the small picture to be an exact resemblance of the Christ in your Triumphal EntranceChrstEJrslm_Haydon - painting - oil
One of Haydon’s three enormous paintings of biblical scenes, together with The Judgment of Solomon and The Resurrection of Lazarus. The ODNB notes the dimensions of Christ’s Entry into Jerusalem as "12 ft 6 in. × 15 ft 1 in., with a frame weighing 600 lb." Exhibited at Egyptian Hall in Piccadilly, London. Wiliam Wordsworth’s head appears in the picture. Now housed in the Athenaeum of Ohio Art Collection of Mount St. Mary’s Seminary. [Source: ODNB]--#ebb
Certainly the “Sin no more” is the very expression he ought to have — but how difficult to catch! You will do it though I am sure? — In the mean time pray take care of your health & your eyes — strong excitement is not good for you. Pray take care.

I have as yet only seen some extracts from Mr. KeatsJohn Keats | Born: 1795-10-31 in Moorgate, London. Died: 1821-02-23 in Rome. ’s new Poems — Those extracts seem to be finer than anything that has been written these 200 years — finer than WordsworthWilliam Wordsworth | Born: 1770-04-07 in Cockermouth, England. Died: 1850-04-23 in Cumberland, England. even — more Dantesque — a compound of ChaucerGeoffrey Chaucer | Born: 1343 in London, England. Died: 1400-10-25 in London, England.
--
& the old FlorentineDurante Alighieri, or: Dante, Dante Alighieri | Born: 1265 in Florence, Tuscany, Italy. Died: 1321-09-14 in Ravenna, Emilia-Romagna, Italy.
--
. — I hope & trust he will live to answer his barbarous Critics by many such works. You may [gap: 1 chars, reason: smudged.][a]ttack the Scotch nevertheless — no fear but they will give you plenty of cause — I like[3] Letter breaks off her as a fragment—#aol