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Letter to Sir William ElfordWilliam Elford, Sir, baronet , Recorder for Plymouth, Recorder for Totnes, Member of Parliament for Plymouth , Member of Parliament for Rye, Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS), Fellow of the Linnaean Society (FLS) | Born: 1749-08 in Kingsbridge, Devon, England. Died: 1837-11-30 in Totnes, Devon, England.
According to L’Estrange, Sir William was first a friend of Mitford’s father, and Mitford met him for the first time in the spring of 1810 when he was a widower nearing the age of 64. They carried on a lively correspondence until his death in 1837. Elford worked as a banker at Plymouth Bank (Elford, Tingcombe and Purchase) in Plymouth, Devon, from its founding in 1782. He was elected a member of Parliament for Plymouth as a supporter of the government and Tory William Pitt, and served from 1796 to 1806. After his election defeat in Plymouth in 1806, he was elected member of Parliament for Rye and served from July 1807 until his resignation in July 1808. For his service in Parliament as a supporter of Pitt, he was made a baronet in 1800. After his son Jonathan came of age, he tried to secure a stable government post for him but never succeeded. Mayor of Plymouth in 1796 and Recorder for Plymouth from 1797 to 1833, he was also Recorder for Totnes from 1832 to 1834. Sir William served as an officer in the South Devon militia from 1788, eventually attaining the rank of Lieutenant Colonel; the unit saw active service in Ireland during the Peninsular Wars. Sir William was a talented amateur painter in oils and watercolors who exhibited at the Royal Society from 1774 to 1837; he exhibited still lifes and portraits but preferred landscapes. He was elected to the Royal Society Academy in 1790. He was also a talented amateur naturalist and was elected to the Royal Linnaean Society in 1790; late in life, he published his findings on an alternative to yeast. He married his first wife, Mary Davies of Plympton, on January 20, 1776 and they had one son, Jonathan, and two daughters, Grace Chard and Elizabeth. After the death of his first wife, he married Elizabeth Hall Walrond, widow of Lieutenant-Colonel Maine Swete Walrond of the Coldstream Guards. His only son Jonathan died in 1823, leaving him without an heir. --#ebb #lmw
, May 13, 1823

Edited by Brooke A. Stewart.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: October 30, 2016. P5.Edition made with help from photos taken by Digital Mitford editors. Digital Mitford photo files: 13May1823SirWilliamElford4b#.JPG, 13May1823SirWilliamElford4a#.JPG, 13May1823SirWilliamElford3a#.JPG, 13May1823SirWilliamElford3b#.JPG, 13May1823SirWilliamElford2b#.JPG, 13May1823SirWilliamElford2a#.JPG, 13May1823SirWilliamElford1b#.JPG, 13May1823SirWilliamElford1a#.JPG, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2013.

Reproduced by courtesy of the Reading Central LibraryReading Central Library
The principal archive of Mary Russell Mitford’s personal papers and related documents, holding approximately 1,000 manuscripts and a nearly comprehensive collection of her publications.--#ghb
.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4 Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 472

One quarto sheet of paper folded in half to form two octavo pages, which comprise pages 1-4 of the letter. The fourth page exposes the address with the end of the letter written along three sides and has been folded in sixths. The third page has a slight rip where the wax seal was attached. Address leaf bearing the following postmarks: 1) Red double-circle duty stamp reading B
15 MY 15 1823
A large 7 denoting the posting fee has been written in black ink by the postal service across the address leaf. Sheet torn on right edge of page three where wax seal was removed. Red wax seal, complete, adhered to page four.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded. Removed line break elements from the address. Checked for completion, ready to be proofed.
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To Sir William Elford Three Mile CrossThree Mile Cross, Berkshire, England | Three Mile Cross | Berkshire | England | 51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 | Village in the parish of Shinfield in Berkshire, where Mary Russell Mitford moved with her parents in 1820. They lived in a cottage there until 1851. --#ebb51.4047211 -0.9734518999999864 May 13th 1823.

The kind interest which you are so good as to take in me, my dear & true friend, is a great consolation and solace—your letter of today was especially delightful to me—& a conversation with you would be more gratifying still—but I am not going to Town—not likely to be there for many months—I have suffered so much in my journeys—or rather my visits there this spring as almost to wish that I [Damage: 1 word, agent: smudge.][may] never be called thither again. Unless by a narration of some hours I could hardly make you comprehend that Charles KembleCharles Kemble | Born: 1775-11-25 in Brecon, South Wales. Died: 1854-11-12 in England.
British actor, the younger brother of John Phillip Kemble and Sarah Siddons. Although he was considered by some to be as fine an actor as his sister and brother, he mostly appeared in secondary rather than leading roles. Father of Frances Kemble. One of the co-proprietors of Covent Garden Theatre . He served as Examiner of Plays in the early nineteenth-century, reviewing plays for licensing by the Lord Chamberlain. --#lmw
though so violently the enemy of Mr. MacreadyWilliam Charles Macready | Born: 1793-03-03 in London, England. Died: 1873-04-27 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England.
English actor, one of the most prominent tragedians of his era. He appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres in London and also toured the United States. He appeared in Sheridan Knowles's William Tell, Byron's Sardanapolus, and Bulwer-Lytton's Money (1840), as well as in many Shakespearean roles. He also managed both Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres. In his role as actor-manager, Macready was a correspondent and collaborator with Mary Russell Mitford. The first play on which they worked was Mitford's Julian. Mitford dedicated to Macready the print edition of Julian: To William Charles Macready, Esq., with high esteem for those endowments which have cast new lustre on his art; with warm admiration for those powers which have inspired, and that taste which has fostered the tragic dramatists of his age; with heartfelt gratitude for the zeal with which he befriended the production of a stranger, for the judicious alterations which he suggested, and for the energy, the pathos, and the skill with which he more than emhodied its principal character; this tragedy is most respectfully dedicated by the author. Macready retired from the stage in 1851. --#lmw
(& of JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. from that enmity) is yet on the whole not intentionally mine—He even wishes very well to the AuthoressMary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb
of his darling play The FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. —In short it is a complete war of the two parties—[del: .]the two plays have been taken up each from motives of selfishness & vanity, & I am the sacrifice. That MacreadyWilliam Charles Macready | Born: 1793-03-03 in London, England. Died: 1873-04-27 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England.
English actor, one of the most prominent tragedians of his era. He appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres in London and also toured the United States. He appeared in Sheridan Knowles's William Tell, Byron's Sardanapolus, and Bulwer-Lytton's Money (1840), as well as in many Shakespearean roles. He also managed both Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres. In his role as actor-manager, Macready was a correspondent and collaborator with Mary Russell Mitford. The first play on which they worked was Mitford's Julian. Mitford dedicated to Macready the print edition of Julian: To William Charles Macready, Esq., with high esteem for those endowments which have cast new lustre on his art; with warm admiration for those powers which have inspired, and that taste which has fostered the tragic dramatists of his age; with heartfelt gratitude for the zeal with which he befriended the production of a stranger, for the judicious alterations which he suggested, and for the energy, the pathos, and the skill with which he more than emhodied its principal character; this tragedy is most respectfully dedicated by the author. Macready retired from the stage in 1851. --#lmw
likes me I know—so does his sister— but I have perhaps suffered even more from their injustice & prejudice & jealousy than from the coarser attacks of the Kembles. In short it is my devoutest wish to be able to do without them & I would labour night & day at any vocation that should free me from the Theatre—from being alternately the idol & the slave of that most fascinating & accom page 2
plished but most tormenting of men William MacreadyWilliam Charles Macready | Born: 1793-03-03 in London, England. Died: 1873-04-27 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England.
English actor, one of the most prominent tragedians of his era. He appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres in London and also toured the United States. He appeared in Sheridan Knowles's William Tell, Byron's Sardanapolus, and Bulwer-Lytton's Money (1840), as well as in many Shakespearean roles. He also managed both Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres. In his role as actor-manager, Macready was a correspondent and collaborator with Mary Russell Mitford. The first play on which they worked was Mitford's Julian. Mitford dedicated to Macready the print edition of Julian: To William Charles Macready, Esq., with high esteem for those endowments which have cast new lustre on his art; with warm admiration for those powers which have inspired, and that taste which has fostered the tragic dramatists of his age; with heartfelt gratitude for the zeal with which he befriended the production of a stranger, for the judicious alterations which he suggested, and for the energy, the pathos, and the skill with which he more than emhodied its principal character; this tragedy is most respectfully dedicated by the author. Macready retired from the stage in 1851. --#lmw
—who had power over me because I have a real regard for his splendid qualities & a sincere gratitude for his unbounded zeal, but whose temper makes that power a perpetual source of misery to himself & to me. Do not misunderstand me—our connexionconnection is merely that of Actor & Author—but this literacy jealousy, his suspicion, & mistrust, have really the character of passion. And yet he is a most ardent &[del: .] devoted friend & it seems ungrateful in me to say so much even to you—with whom of course it will remain sacred. Do not show this letter to any oneanyone. I have still The FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. in Covent Garden TheatreTheatre Royal, Covent Garden, London, England | Covent Garden Theatre | Covent Garden | Westminster | London | England | 51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585 | A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the royal "patent theaters." The first theater on this site was opened in 1732 by John Rich, renovated by architect Henry Holland in 1792, and destroyed by fire on 20 Sept. 1808. The second theater, designed by Robert Smirke, opened on 18 Sept. 1809 and was managed by John Phillip Kemble. Because of rent increases by the Duke of Bedford, the landowner, J.P. Kemble increased ticket prices. This led to the "old price (or O.P.) riots" and the eventual lowering of ticket prices, although the proprietors proved they would lose money at those prices. The second theater was destroyed by fire on 5 March 1856. The third theater, designed by Edward Middleton Barry, opened in 1858 and remains at the center of today’s theater complex. The theater became the Royal Opera House in 1892 and the building was renovated and expanded in the 1980s and 1990s. --#lmw51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585, & if Mr. YoungCharles Mayne Young, or: Mr. Young | Born: 1777-01-10 in Fenchurch Street, London, England. Died: 1856.
Actor who performed at Covent Garden and Drury Lane between 1807 and 1832. Rival of Kean. Known for his Hamlet. Written about by Washington Irving. His son wrote a memoir of him in 1871. --#lmw
be engaged there next year it will be brought out—but if Charles KembleCharles Kemble | Born: 1775-11-25 in Brecon, South Wales. Died: 1854-11-12 in England.
British actor, the younger brother of John Phillip Kemble and Sarah Siddons. Although he was considered by some to be as fine an actor as his sister and brother, he mostly appeared in secondary rather than leading roles. Father of Frances Kemble. One of the co-proprietors of Covent Garden Theatre . He served as Examiner of Plays in the early nineteenth-century, reviewing plays for licensing by the Lord Chamberlain. --#lmw
calls[del: .] on MacreadyWilliam Charles Macready | Born: 1793-03-03 in London, England. Died: 1873-04-27 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England.
English actor, one of the most prominent tragedians of his era. He appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres in London and also toured the United States. He appeared in Sheridan Knowles's William Tell, Byron's Sardanapolus, and Bulwer-Lytton's Money (1840), as well as in many Shakespearean roles. He also managed both Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres. In his role as actor-manager, Macready was a correspondent and collaborator with Mary Russell Mitford. The first play on which they worked was Mitford's Julian. Mitford dedicated to Macready the print edition of Julian: To William Charles Macready, Esq., with high esteem for those endowments which have cast new lustre on his art; with warm admiration for those powers which have inspired, and that taste which has fostered the tragic dramatists of his age; with heartfelt gratitude for the zeal with which he befriended the production of a stranger, for the judicious alterations which he suggested, and for the energy, the pathos, and the skill with which he more than emhodied its principal character; this tragedy is most respectfully dedicated by the author. Macready retired from the stage in 1851. --#lmw
to play The DogeDoge Foscari
character in Mitford’s play Foscari See also historical counterpart: Doge Foscari.--#ebb
I have pledged myself to M. [1] Here, Mitford is likely referring to Macready as "M." and she has promised him to withdraw the play if Charles Kemble insists that he (Macready) play the old Doge instead of Foscari. The two actors had been at odds for some time over which would play the role of Foscari. The feud is mentioned in Mitford's letter to Talfourd on November 20, 1822. It is later noted in Mitford's journal on February 11, 1823 that she had heard from Talfourd that Macready would indeed refuse to play the Doge.—#bas #ebbto withdraw it—that is if I can, for Charles KembleCharles Kemble | Born: 1775-11-25 in Brecon, South Wales. Died: 1854-11-12 in England.
British actor, the younger brother of John Phillip Kemble and Sarah Siddons. Although he was considered by some to be as fine an actor as his sister and brother, he mostly appeared in secondary rather than leading roles. Father of Frances Kemble. One of the co-proprietors of Covent Garden Theatre . He served as Examiner of Plays in the early nineteenth-century, reviewing plays for licensing by the Lord Chamberlain. --#lmw
is indignant [at] my thinking of such a thing.—I intend if MacreadyWilliam Charles Macready | Born: 1793-03-03 in London, England. Died: 1873-04-27 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England.
English actor, one of the most prominent tragedians of his era. He appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres in London and also toured the United States. He appeared in Sheridan Knowles's William Tell, Byron's Sardanapolus, and Bulwer-Lytton's Money (1840), as well as in many Shakespearean roles. He also managed both Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres. In his role as actor-manager, Macready was a correspondent and collaborator with Mary Russell Mitford. The first play on which they worked was Mitford's Julian. Mitford dedicated to Macready the print edition of Julian: To William Charles Macready, Esq., with high esteem for those endowments which have cast new lustre on his art; with warm admiration for those powers which have inspired, and that taste which has fostered the tragic dramatists of his age; with heartfelt gratitude for the zeal with which he befriended the production of a stranger, for the judicious alterations which he suggested, and for the energy, the pathos, and the skill with which he more than emhodied its principal character; this tragedy is most respectfully dedicated by the author. Macready retired from the stage in 1851. --#lmw
remains in Covent GardenTheatre Royal, Covent Garden, London, England | Covent Garden Theatre | Covent Garden | Westminster | London | England | 51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585 | A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the royal "patent theaters." The first theater on this site was opened in 1732 by John Rich, renovated by architect Henry Holland in 1792, and destroyed by fire on 20 Sept. 1808. The second theater, designed by Robert Smirke, opened on 18 Sept. 1809 and was managed by John Phillip Kemble. Because of rent increases by the Duke of Bedford, the landowner, J.P. Kemble increased ticket prices. This led to the "old price (or O.P.) riots" and the eventual lowering of ticket prices, although the proprietors proved they would lose money at those prices. The second theater was destroyed by fire on 5 March 1856. The third theater, designed by Edward Middleton Barry, opened in 1858 and remains at the center of today’s theater complex. The theater became the Royal Opera House in 1892 and the building was renovated and expanded in the 1980s and 1990s. --#lmw51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585 (remember that this is most strictly confidential) to write a tragedy on a very grand historical subject (RienziCola di Rienzo, Tribune of Rome | Born: 1313. Died: 1354-10-08.
The historical figure on whom Mitford's character, Cola di Rienzi, is based. Rienzo rose from humble origins as the son of a washerwoman and a tavern keeper to lead a bloodless coup against Rome’s aristocracy through his powerful oratory in the 1340s. He named himself in 1347 the Tribune of Rome, and he aimed to restore Rome to its classical glory as the capitol of a united Italian nation and empire. Although he would lose power within a year to vengeful barons united in opposition against him, Rienzo became legendary for his meteoric career, his humiliation of bullying overlords, and his rule dedicated to the restoring the dignity of Roman people in a time of chaos and confusion. His contemporary, the poet Petrarch, admired Rienzo as a man of humble origins who could unite the Roman people with his inspiring oratory and construct a new regime to punish abusers of power. --#ebb
. vide Gibbon Vol ^11 or 12.) & send it to him to bring out without a name—this will avoid the John BullJohn Bull. London :
English periodical founded in 1820 and published between 1820 and 1825 and in a second series between 1833 and 1892.--#err
attacking & those which have been [launched] against me merely as a woman—But this is a profound secret. I do this because all the higher Critics say that JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. though murdered in the acting is full of dramatic power of vigour  & vividness & rapidity—& if I can display these qualities in a great historical play & it be only fairly[del: .] performed it cannot fail. I think this well worthy of another trial—besides there is EllistonRobert William Elliston, or: Mr. Elliston | Born: 1774 in London, England. Died: 1831.
English actor and theater manager. Managed Drury Lane and and other theaters. Mentioned in the writings of Leigh Hunt, Byron, and Macready. --#lmw
wanting ^my plays—At page 3
the same time I go to [del: .]the work as a victim to the Altar, so much do I dread the scenes which I know ^first or last I must encounter—but it is my duty & that settles all. You have yourself no notion how unfit I am for the terrible struggles amongst which I have been placed—MacreadyWilliam Charles Macready | Born: 1793-03-03 in London, England. Died: 1873-04-27 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England.
English actor, one of the most prominent tragedians of his era. He appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres in London and also toured the United States. He appeared in Sheridan Knowles's William Tell, Byron's Sardanapolus, and Bulwer-Lytton's Money (1840), as well as in many Shakespearean roles. He also managed both Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres. In his role as actor-manager, Macready was a correspondent and collaborator with Mary Russell Mitford. The first play on which they worked was Mitford's Julian. Mitford dedicated to Macready the print edition of Julian: To William Charles Macready, Esq., with high esteem for those endowments which have cast new lustre on his art; with warm admiration for those powers which have inspired, and that taste which has fostered the tragic dramatists of his age; with heartfelt gratitude for the zeal with which he befriended the production of a stranger, for the judicious alterations which he suggested, and for the energy, the pathos, and the skill with which he more than emhodied its principal character; this tragedy is most respectfully dedicated by the author. Macready retired from the stage in 1851. --#lmw
says that my character is a complete counteraction to my genius—& perhaps he is right—I literally cannot scold & squabble & bargain & hold out & threaten as he would have m[gap: 1 chars, reason: torn.][e]—I can neither resist kindness—nor bear up under hard usage—& this feebleness—this want of moral courage will not do for a Theatre. But I must try once again—It is my duty—There is no other way in which I have fair prospect of making so much money.—Mr. Davison[2] This is possibly Thomas Davison, ultra-radical Regency London printer, publisher, and journalist. Mitford mentions him in her letter to Talfourd on April 24, 1823 regarding a possible strike until they received payment for their published works in the Lady's Magazine.—#bas has taken to the Lady's MagazineThe Lady's Magazine. . London: 1770-1847.
A popular and influential monthly magazine for women that ran from 1756 until 1847 under various editorships, publishers, and subtitles. It offered fiction, poetry, as well as educational pieces, and spawned a series of immitators, including Blackwood's Lady's Magazine. The first series was published as volumes 1 through 49 from August 1770 to December 1818. Ownership and series numbering are unclear for 1819. It was thereafter continued as "new series" (series two), volumes 1 through 10, from 1820 to 1829, under two different subtitles. Between 1830 and 1832, the magazine advertised volumes one to five as an "improved series." In 1832, it merged with The Lady's Museum and continued until 1837as the Lady's Magazine and Museum of Belle Lettres &c. , improved series, and enlarged, volumes 1 through 11. The magazine underwent a further merger in 1837, when it was continued as the Court Magazine and Monthly Critic and Lady's Magazine and Museum of Belles Lettres, volumes 12 through 31, improved series and enlarged. It ceased publication in 1837 with volume 31. In the 1820s, Mitford was a frequent contributor, contributing the stories and sketches that would later be collected as Our Village. Sources: English Press, Then and Now ; WorldCat ; The Lady's Magazine and the Emergence of Women as Active Participants in the Eighteenth-Century Periodical Press. ; Lady's Magazine in Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature, vol. 1 (Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1940). --#lmw #scw
& promises if not[del: .] "indemnity for the past security for the future." I told you I believe that the late EditorSamuel Hamilton, or:
Publisher and editor of the Lady’s Magazine. He took over the publishing business of his father and grandfather, both named Archibald, alongside his brother, also named Archibald. He first appeared as the printer of the magazine in August 1799. Mitford had contributed articles to the magazine, for which Hamilton may have neglected to pay her the total amount due, sometime in 1823. --#bas
had run away upwards of forty pounds in my debt—after having, chiefly by my Articles, encreasedincreased the sale of the Magazine from 250 to 2,000.[3] This is probably referring to the number of subscribers or copies sold.—#bas However I hope Mr. Davison will go on—for he is sure pay & that sort of drudgery is Heaven when compared to Covent GardenTheatre Royal, Covent Garden, London, England | Covent Garden Theatre | Covent Garden | Westminster | London | England | 51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585 | A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the royal "patent theaters." The first theater on this site was opened in 1732 by John Rich, renovated by architect Henry Holland in 1792, and destroyed by fire on 20 Sept. 1808. The second theater, designed by Robert Smirke, opened on 18 Sept. 1809 and was managed by John Phillip Kemble. Because of rent increases by the Duke of Bedford, the landowner, J.P. Kemble increased ticket prices. This led to the "old price (or O.P.) riots" and the eventual lowering of ticket prices, although the proprietors proved they would lose money at those prices. The second theater was destroyed by fire on 5 March 1856. The third theater, designed by Edward Middleton Barry, opened in 1858 and remains at the center of today’s theater complex. The theater became the Royal Opera House in 1892 and the building was renovated and expanded in the 1980s and 1990s. --#lmw51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585.—In the mean time there is one thing which to so old & kind a friend I venture to mention—My FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
Father of Mary Rusell Mitford, George Mitford was the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. The family name is sometimes recorded as Midford. Immediate family called him by nicknames including Drum, Tod, and Dodo. He was a member of a minor branch of the Mitfords of Mitford Castle in Northumberland. Although later sources would suggest that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree and he did not generally refer to himself as Dr. Mitford, preferring to style himself Esq.. In 1784, he is listed in a Hampshire directory as surgeon (medicine) of Alresford. His father and grandfather worked as apothecary-surgeons and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. He assisted Mitford's literary career by representing her interests in London and elsewhere with theater owners and publishers. He was active in Whig politics and later served as a local magistrate. He coursed greyhounds with his friend James Webb. --#lmw
has at last resolved, partly I believe instigated by the effect which the terrible feeling of responsibility, & want of power ^has had on my health & spirits, to try if he can himself to obtain any employment which may lighten the burthen. He is, as you know, Active healthy & intelligent, & with a strong sense of duty & of right—I am sure that he would fulfill to the utmost any change that might be confided to him—& if it were one in which my mother or I could assist you may be assured that he page 4
would have zealous & faithful coadjutor. For the Management of estates or any country affairs he is particularly well qualified—or any work of superintendancesuperintendence which requires integrity & attention—If you should hear of any such either in DevonshireDevonshire, England | Devon | 50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 | County in the south west of England bordering the English Channel and the Bristol Channel. Now called Devon.--#ebb #lmw50.7155591 -3.5308750000000373 or elsewhere would you mention him? or at least let me know? The addition of 2 or even one hundred a year to our little income joined to what I am in a manner sure of gaining by mere industry would take a load from my heart of which I can scarcely give you an idea—It would be everything to me, for it would give me what for many months I have not had the full command of my own powers—Even JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. was written under a pressure of anxiety which left me not a moments rest.—I am however at present quite recovered from the physical effects of this tormenting affair—& have regained my flesh & colour—& almost my power of writing prose articles—& if I could but recover my old hopefulness & elasticity should be again such as I used to be in happier days—If I could but see my dear FatherGeorge Mitford, Esq., or: George Midford | Born: . Died: .
Father of Mary Rusell Mitford, George Mitford was the son of Francis Midford, surgeon, and Jane Graham. The family name is sometimes recorded as Midford. Immediate family called him by nicknames including Drum, Tod, and Dodo. He was a member of a minor branch of the Mitfords of Mitford Castle in Northumberland. Although later sources would suggest that he was a graduate of the University of Edinburgh medical school, there is no evidence that he obtained a medical degree and he did not generally refer to himself as Dr. Mitford, preferring to style himself Esq.. In 1784, he is listed in a Hampshire directory as surgeon (medicine) of Alresford. His father and grandfather worked as apothecary-surgeons and it seems likely that he served a medical apprenticeship with family members. He married Mary Russell on October 17, 1785 at New Alresford, Hampshire. On the marriage allegation papers, both gave their addresses as Old Alresford; they later came to live at Broad Street in New Alresford. Their only child to live to adulthood, Mary Russell Mitford, was born two years later on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire. He assisted Mitford's literary career by representing her interests in London and elsewhere with theater owners and publishers. He was active in Whig politics and later served as a local magistrate. He coursed greyhounds with his friend James Webb. --#lmw
set[gap: 3 chars, reason: covered.][tle]d in my employment I know I should.—

Very gratefully yours
M.R.[gap: 1 chars, reason: torn.][M.]Mary Russell Mitford | Born: 1787-12-16 in New Alresford, Hampshire, England. Died: 1855-01-10 in Swallowfield, Berkshire, England.
Poet, playwright, writer of prose fiction sketches, Mary Russell Mitford is, of course, the subject of our archive. Mary Russell Mitford was born on December 16, 1787 at New Alresford, Hampshire, the only child of George Mitford (or Midford) and Mary Russell. She was baptized on February 29, 1788. Much of her writing was devoted to supporting herself and her parents. She received a civil list pension in 1837. Census records from 1841 indicate that she is living with her father George, three female servants: Kerenhappuch Taylor (Mary’s ladies maid), two maids of all work, Mary Bramley and Mary Allaway, and a manservant (probably serving also as gardener), Benjamin Embury. The 1851 census lists her occupation as "authoress," and lists her as living at Three Mile Cross with Kerenhappuch Taylor (lady’s maid), Sarah Chernk (maid-of-all-work), and Samuel Swetman (gardener), after the death of her father. Mitford’s long life and prolific career ended after injuries from a carriage accident. She is buried in Swallowfield churchyard. The executor of her will and her literary executor was the Rev. William Harness and her lady’s maid, Kerenhappuch Taylor Sweetman, was residuary legatee of her estate. --#lmw #ebb

P.S. The Duke of Glo'ster [4] Contraction of Gloucester. The Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh was a British royal title. The Duke during this time would have been Prince William Frederick (1776-1834).—#bas went once if not twice to see JulianJulian; a Tragedy in Five Acts. Mary Russell Mitford. London New York: G. B. Whittaker W. B. Gilley . 1823. you know him I believe

To
Sir William Elford Bart
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