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Letter to B.R. HaydonBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He killed himself in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
, 1823 October 1

Edited by Hailey Lown.

Sponsored by:

First digital edition in TEI, date: 11 August 2014. P5. . 1Oct1823BRHaydon1b#.JPG, 1Oct1823BRHaydon2a#.JPG, 1Oct1823BRHaydon2b#.JPG, 1Oct1823BRHaydon1a#.JPG, .

Published by: Digital Mitford: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive, Greensburg, PA, USA: 2014.

Reproduced by courtesy of the The Reading Central Library.

Digital Mitford Letters: The Mary Russell Mitford Archive

Repository: The Reading Central Library. Shelf mark: qB/TU/MIT Vol. 4, Horizon No.: 1361550 ff. 477

One octavo sheet of paper folded in thirds. The second page bears the end of the letter on one side, and (after being folded into three panels) exposes the address on the other side. Address leaf bearing the following postmarks: 1) Sepia-colored oval delivery stamp, that is intact, in the top right of the address leaf page. 2 A*NOON 2
OC*1
1823 2) Sepia-colored badge shaped delivery stamp, that is intact, at the top left of the address leaf page. It was applied upon deposit of the letter at the local PO. 4 EVEN 4
1*OC
1823 3) Black, rectangular, Receiving House Stamp. Seems to say: Fleet St. 4) A large 3, denoting the fee for a single-sheet letter, has been written in black ink by the postal service across the address leaf. Red wax seal.

Hands other than Mitford's noted on this manuscript:

Mitford’s spelling and punctuation are retained, except where a word is split at the end of a line and the beginning of the next in the manuscript. Where Mitford’s spelling and hyphenation of words deviates from the standard, in order to facilitate searching we are using the TEI elements “choice," “sic," and “reg" to encode both Mitford’s spelling and the regular international standard of Oxford English spelling, following the first listed spelling in the Oxford English Dictionary. The long s and ligatured forms are not encoded. Added pencil handNote and editorial note about fragment. Proofed the body of the letter against the manuscript. Fixed transcription errors and dash format. This needs to be reviewed further—there are still issues and questions. Checked for completion, illegible word in handNote not clarified. Added collection information, corrected stamp and handNote info. Added idno information, photo files, and revised photo permission statement. Updated header to include the correct letter xml:id. Fixed minor formatting errors in respStmt. Proofed and corrected.
page 1
To B.R. Haydon Esqr.Benjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He killed himself in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw
Oct. 1823.
Fragment— [1] The pen annotator has indicated that what follows is only a fragment of a letter. The beginning of the letter appears to be missing. This would explain why there is no greeting, date, or address at the beginning.—#bas 15

I have a sneaking kindness for portraits—I do not mean the faces on the Royal  AcademyRoyal Academy of Arts | The private arts institution The Royal Academy of Arts was founded by George III on 10 December 1768, at the behest of architect Sir William Chambers. Chambers and other artists and architects sought to establish a British national "society for promoting the Arts of Design," a society that would sponsor an annual exhibition (later the Summer Exhibition) as well as a School of Design (later the Royal Academy Schools.) Thirty-four founding members were elected; today, the society elects no more than eighty members at one time as Royal Academicians (Members of the Royal Academy, RA). During Mitford’s time, the Royal Academy was housed at Somerset House, a building designed and built by Chambers beginning in 1776 and likely not completed until after 1819. The institution moved to Trafalgar Square in the 1830s, to share space with the newly-founded National Gallery, and remained there until 1867. Mitford’s friend and correspondent Benjamin Robert Haydon, was a Member of the Royal Academy. | --#lmw walls—but those portraits which escaped from the great painters—TitianTiziano Vecelli | Born: 1488-1490 in Pieve di Cadore, Italy. Died: 1576-08-27 in Venice, Italy .
--
RubensPeter Paul Rubens, Sir | Born: 1577-06-28 in Siegan, Nassau-Dillenburg. Died: 1640-05-30 in Antwerp, Spanish Netherland.
A portrait, landscape, and history painter in oils, Rubens is best-known for his female nudes of biblical, allegorical, and mythological subjects; he also produced commissioned Counter-Reformation altarpieces. At the height of his career, he ran a large studio in Antwerp, and he was knighted by both Charles I of England and Philip IV of Spain. He used the production of prints and book title-pages, based on his drawings, to extend his fame in Europe, working with the renowned Plantin-Moretus publishing house. --#lmw
RembrandtRembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn | Born: 1606-07-15 in Leiden, Netherlands. Died: 1669-10-04 in Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Famous Dutch Golden Age painter and printmaker. A prolific painter and printmaker, Rembrandt is usually regarded as the greatest artist of the Netherlands’ Golden Age. Best known for his portraits in oil, particularly his many self-portraits, he also painted landscapes and narratives, including biblical and mythological scenes. He was also a skilled printmaker, employing etching as well as dry point techniques. See The Met’s Rembrandt site at . --#hbl #lmw #ebb
—& that is the way that yours will be considered not only by posterity but by that main part of posterity the next generation the Englishmen of twenty years hence. Paint plenty of portraits—& plenty of humourous pictures—it is your peculiar talent—& do tell me what this one is about—I am so stupid that I have not been able to guess—Tell me this secret—& I will tell you one in return. & you must mot even let any [gap: 1 word, reason: torn.][one] know that there is in my care a secret to tell.—I am sorry for what you tell me of Mr. HazlittWilliam Hazlitt | Born: 1778-04-10 in Maidstone, Kent, England. Died: 1830-09-18 in Soho, London, England.
Essayist and critic, acquaintance of Mary Russell Mitford. Author of Table Talk (1821) and The Spirit of the Age (1825). Also authored collections of critical essays such as Characters of Shakespeare (1817), A View of the English Stage (1818), and English Comic Writers (1819). In a letter of 2 October 1820 , Mary Russell Mitford writes of Hazlitt to their mutual friend Haydon, He is the most delightful critic in the [world]-- puts all his taste, his wit, his deep thinking, his matchless acuteness into his subject, but he does not put his whole heart & soul into it [. . . ] What charms me most in Mr. Haslitt is the beautiful candour which he bursts forth sometimes from his own prejudices [ . . . ] I admire him so ardently that when I begin to talk of him I never know how to stop. I could talk on for an hour in a see saw of praise and blame as he himself does of Beaumont & Fletcher & some of his old [favourites]. --#lmw #cmm
—because the good faith his writings was their greatest charm—but in the Fonthill affair [2] William Hazlitt visited Fonthill Abbey from September to October 1823. In a letter from Haydon to Mitford of September 1823, Haydon mentions that Hazlitt left Fonthill for a night or two to visit a couple of his "flames" after he had just recently divorced his wife.—#bas much may be said on page 2
[gap: 2 words, reason: torn.]—& at all events there is nobody like him.—Tell dear Mrs. HaydonMary Hyman Haydon
The daughter of the Rev. Benjamin Cobley, the Rector of Dodbrooke, Kingsbridge, Devon, she was widowed with two children when she married Benjamin Robert Haydon on 10 October 1821.--#ghb
with my kindest love that now Mr. MacreadyWilliam Charles Macready | Born: 1793-03-03 in London, England. Died: 1873-04-27 in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England.
English actor, one of the most prominent tragedians of his era. He appeared at Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres in London and also toured the United States. He appeared in Sheridan Knowles's William Tell, Byron's Sardanapolus, and Bulwer-Lytton's Money (1840), as well as in many Shakespearean roles. He also managed both Covent Garden and Drury Lane Theatres. In his role as actor-manager, Macready was a correspondent and collaborator with Mary Russell Mitford. The first play on which they worked was Mitford's Julian. Mitford dedicated to Macready the print edition of Julian: To William Charles Macready, Esq., with high esteem for those endowments which have cast new lustre on his art; with warm admiration for those powers which have inspired, and that taste which has fostered the tragic dramatists of his age; with heartfelt gratitude for the zeal with which he befriended the production of a stranger, for the judicious alterations which he suggested, and for the energy, the pathos, and the skill with which he more than emhodied its principal character; this tragedy is most respectfully dedicated by the author. Macready retired from the stage in 1851. --#lmw
has left Covent gardenTheatre Royal, Covent Garden, London, England | Covent Garden Theatre | Covent Garden | Westminster | London | England | 51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585 | A West End theater located in Covent Garden in the London borough of Westminster. One of the royal "patent theaters." The first theater on this site was opened in 1732 by John Rich, renovated by architect Henry Holland in 1792, and destroyed by fire on 20 Sept. 1808. The second theater, designed by Robert Smirke, opened on 18 Sept. 1809 and was managed by John Phillip Kemble. Because of rent increases by the Duke of Bedford, the landowner, J.P. Kemble increased ticket prices. This led to the "old price (or O.P.) riots" and the eventual lowering of ticket prices, although the proprietors proved they would lose money at those prices. The second theater was destroyed by fire on 5 March 1856. The third theater, designed by Edward Middleton Barry, opened in 1858 and remains at the center of today’s theater complex. The theater became the Royal Opera House in 1892 and the building was renovated and expanded in the 1980s and 1990s. --#lmw51.5129211 -0.12219759999993585. I hope the FoscariFoscari: A Tragedy. Mary Russell Mitford. London : G. B. Whittaker . 1826. will be brought out there this season.—And now goodbye and God bless you—


Ever your'syours
M. R. Mitford


B. R. Haydon EsqreBenjamin Robert Haydon | Born: 1786-01-26 in Plymouth, England. Died: 1846-06-22 in London.
Benjamin Robert Haydon was a painter educated at the Royal Academy, who was famous for contemporary, historical, classical, biblical, and mythological scenes, though tormented by financial difficulties. He painted William Wordsworth’s portrait in 1842. MRM was introduced to him at his London studio in the spring of 1817, and Sir William Elford was a mutual friend. He killed himself in 1846. English painter and author (1786-1846) Published Autobiography in 3 vols. (1853) John Keats named him in several poems. --#ebb #lmw

8 Paddington Green
Near the Church
Paddington